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The London police criticize Boris Johnson's new rules as "absurd" and "nonsense".


"Six months" curbs

  • All pubs, bars and restaurants in England are subject to a curfew at 10:00 p.m. on Thursday. The Prime Minister insists that the premises must kick all customers out by the deadline.
  • The hospitality sector will also be limited to table service only, as the government has banned drinkers taking a trip to the bar.
  • All indoor retail workers and customers are required to wear masks – unless they are seated to eat or drink.
  • All employees who can work from home will be asked to do so from tomorrow.
  • The fines for violating the Rule of Six and missing face covering increase to £ 200 for a first offense.
  • Police will now have the option to call on the military for assistance, with soldiers possibly being drafted to perform official duties and guarding protected locations so that officers have more time to take action against rule violations.
  • The number of people allowed to attend weddings in England will be reduced to 15 from Monday, but the number of people allowed to attend a funeral will remain at 30.
  • Plans for the partial return of sports fans to the stadiums on October 1 have been suspended.
  • The rule of six exemptions is tightened to ban team sports such as five-on-five soccer games.

Police have labeled Boris Johnson's new rules "absurd" and "nonsense" as small business owners say they will go broke if workers stay home.

The prime minister found himself exposed to fire on all sides as he turned his urge to reopen workplaces after just a few weeks to tell office workers to work from home if they can.

He was barbed for introducing new measures, including a 10 p.m. pubs curfew and £ 200 fines for violating mask rules related to new social restrictions in England.

The Prime Minister also announced that he would be making the army available to help police enforce strict new coronavirus rules.

He said officers now have the option to resort to military assistance if needed to free up staff so that more can crack down on rule violations, as he found fines doubled to £ 200.

However, Downing Street ruled out the use of soldiers on the street, saying they would be used to "perform certain duties like office roles and guarding protected locations so the police can't enforce the virus response".

Metropolitan Police Federation Chairman Ken Marsh criticized the announcement as "nonsense" and National Police Federation Chairman John Apter said it was "lacking in details".

Meanwhile, UKHospitality chief executive Kate Nicholls described the restrictions as "another crushing blow" for many companies.

At the same time, Tory MPs warned there could be no further "major lockdown" and said the decision to end the retreat will cause "dismay" among workers living in "cramped, overcrowded shelters" .

They also warned that their constituents would be angry at the new policy after following the government's rules only to see that “people protested, at street parties, with no action taken against them.

But Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned Mr Johnson that his actions did not go far enough as it banned people from visiting their own homes in an attempt to lower the Covid-19 R rate north of the border.

Boris Johnson announced today that pubs and restaurants in England will be closed from 10pm on Thursday

Metropolitan Police Federation Chairman Ken Marsh (pictured) criticized today's announcement as "nonsense".

National Police Federation of England and Wales Chairman John Apter (pictured) said details were lacking.

Metropolitan Police Federation Chairman Ken Marsh (left) criticized today's announcement as "nonsense" and National Police Federation Chairman John Apter (right) said there was "a lack of detail".

The Prime Minister said the police would now have "the ability to resort to military assistance if needed" to release officers to allow more action against rule violations, as he found fines doubled to £ 200

The Prime Minister said the police would now have "the ability to resort to military assistance if needed" to release officers to allow more action against rule violations, as he found fines doubled to £ 200

Data from Public Health England shows that of the 729 outbreaks in the week ended September 13, only five percent occurred in grocery stores such as restaurants and pubs

Data from Public Health England shows that of the 729 outbreaks in the week ended September 13, only five percent occurred in grocery stores such as restaurants and pubs

Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned his actions did not go far enough as she banned her compatriots from visiting their own homes in an attempt to lower the Covid-19 R rate in Scotland

Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon warned that his actions did not go far enough when she banned her compatriots from visiting their own homes in an attempt to lower the Covid-19 R rate in Scotland

The government's latest coronavirus crackdown was revealed as follows:

  • Sir Keir Starmer used his first speech at the Labor Conference as Chair to warn that a second national lockdown would be a "sign of government failure and not a force majeure" that would take an "immense toll" on public health and the economy would mean.
  • Sir Keir also claimed that the government's "incompetence" was "holding the UK back" and that Conservatives "underfunding of the NHS" and "abandoning welfare" had kept Britain unprepared for the pandemic.
  • Julian Knight, Tory chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) selection board, said without a "route map" to bring viewers back to sporting events, "we risk decimating our sporting and cultural infrastructure."
  • Shares in some of the UK's largest pub chains felt the crisis following the 10pm curfew announcement, when City Pub Group fell 6.6 percent while Wetherspoons fell 0.4 percent.
  • Welsh Health Minister Vaughan Gething welcomed the UK government's decision to return to home work as he said it was "a welcome shift … that fits our position".
  • Tory peer Andrew Lloyd Webber warned that commercial theater will not survive unless the government "steps on the table".
  • Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey said the rise in coronavirus cases was "extremely difficult news for all of us and the whole country" as the bank "will do whatever it takes to help the businesses and the people of the country to support & # 39 ;.
  • The government said there were an additional 4,926 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK as of 9 a.m. on Tuesday, bringing the total to 403,551.

Nicola Sturgeon BANNED Scots from visiting within their own four walls

Starting tomorrow, Scots will be banned from visiting each other in their own four walls, Nicola Sturgeon said today as she reintroduced the strict lockdown rules.

The Prime Minister said a "high proportion" of new cases in the country are related to transmission in private homes, where social distancing and ventilation are more difficult than outdoors or in public buildings.

Speaking to MSPs in Holyrood minutes after Boris Johnson unveiled new lockdown measures in England, she said his steps did not go far enough and her advice was that "lowering the R number north of the border will not be enough" .

The First Minister responded to reports that action in Scotland could take up to six months and hoped that this would not be the case.

She told MSPs: “Until scientific developments like a vaccine change the game in the fight against Covid-19, it will certainly have an impact on our lives.

“That doesn't necessarily mean that all of the new restrictions I announce today will last for six months.

"We hope that through early and substantial action, these new measures will be implemented for a shorter period of time than would be the case if we waited longer for action."

The chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, Mr. Marsh, warned that the rules were "nonsense" and "absurd".

He told MailOnline: “In terms of enforcement, it's really difficult for us. I mean, I'm not a huge fan of Nicola Sturgeon, but at least she sets the tone.

“If someone sneaks and says that Mr. Big has 20 people in his house, what do we do? Sitting in front of his house all evening waiting for people to come out and count or something?

& # 39; That's an address. We are talking about millions of addresses. It's just nonsense. It is absolutely absurd. Why can't they implement what's in Scotland? I have no idea.

& # 39; Why? Why is our six but Scotland's no one? It's not right, and it just makes it so hard for my colleagues to get it through, when you can make it crystal clear enough that it's not ambiguous. There is no way around. These are the rules. Hold on to them. & # 39;

He added, “But you know, when the Home Secretary tells your neighbors Snitch, good luck with that one Priti Patel. How are we supposed to get this through? & # 39;

The National Police Federation of England and Wales President John Apter added: “Further funding to monitor this pandemic is urgently needed.

& # 39; The service needs all the help it can get as financial pressures on the armed forces increase day by day – but today's announcement didn't provide any details. We'll wait for that before partying too much. Since the beginning of this pandemic, the police and the military have been working together on logistics.

& # 39; That works and works well; However, the prime minister's announcement has been taken up by some as a suggestion that the military will be on the streets to help police enforce Covid regulations. This is not what the police asked for and is not what they need. & # 39;

Mr. Apter added, “This is a constantly changing situation and the police officers will continue to do an incredible job of adapting quickly.

“The vast majority of the public have respected the restrictions placed on them. These limitations affect us all, but the point is to keep one another as safe as possible.

"I would hope that the public will continue to do what is right to protect their fellow citizens and minimize the spread of the virus."

Go to the altar this weekend! The hammer blow for couples who tie the knot as wedding guests is limited to 15 from Monday according to the new Covid rules

Wedding ceremonies and receptions in England are set to be limited to 15 people under the new coronavirus restrictions to curb an increase in certain cases.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the number of people admitted to wedding parties should be cut in half.

However, he added that funeral directors were exempt from the restrictions and the maximum number of mourners would remain at 30.

The festivities held this weekend will only narrowly bypass the new restrictions that will come into effect in England on Monday.

Outlining the action in the House of Commons, Mr Johnson said, “Fifth, now is the time to tighten the rule of six.

"I'm afraid that from Monday a maximum of 15 people will be able to attend wedding ceremonies and receptions, although up to now 30 can still attend a funeral."

Weddings and ceremonies and receptions of civil partnerships were added to a list of exemptions from the ban on social gatherings of more than six people, in which up to 30 people, including the couple, were allowed.

Funeral directors are exempt from the rule of six, unless stated in areas with local lockdown restrictions.

No more than 30 people are allowed to attend a funeral in England and Wales, while Scotland cannot accept more than 20 people.

However, the ban on gatherings of more than six people applies to guards or receptions in private homes or gardens in England, unless the participants are all from the same household or support bubble.

The new restrictions also created anger in the hospitality industry. Ms. Nicholls, UK Hospitality General Manager, described it as "another devastating blow" to many companies.

She said, “A hard graduation time is bad for business and bad for virus control. We need to give people time to disperse over a longer period of time.

“Since reopening, table service has been widespread in some parts of the sector, but not required in all areas of business such as coffee shops.

"It's hard to understand how these measures are the answer to the disease when government data shows that only 5 percent of infections outside the home are hospitality-related."

Will Johns, 45, owner of Anderson and Hill Deli on the Great Western Arcade, said, “We rely on people to come to work – downtown 95% of people come to the office.

“People are returning and business has improved since the restrictions were relaxed.

& # 39; We're about 50 percent where we were before the lockdown and while we've walked 20-30 percent.

& # 39; It's impossible to be optimistic because we have no idea what's going to happen in the next six months.

“You shouldn't be optimistic when there is nothing positive about it. The government is 100 percent reactionary.

“They have no solution and only react to what is happening and what they are told from day to day.

“I still have an employee on vacation who has worked part-time, sometimes full-time.

“There is no way I can afford to keep her busy the same hours as before.

"I'm balanced and we're almost alive, but it's not really a business."

Mr Johnson said the UK was at a "dangerous turning point" in the fight against the virus. As of Thursday, he imposed a 10 p.m. curfew on all restaurants, bars and pubs across England, with the hospitality sector also limited to table service.

The requirement to wear face coverings is expanded to include retail workers and customers in indoor hospitality establishments, except when they are at a table to eat or drink.

He also announced the end of the government's return to work when he said he was now urging "office workers who can work from home".

The government has actively encouraged workers to work from home and today's U-turn marks a humiliating rise for the prime minister, who told his cabinet this earlier this month "People in our country are returning to the office in large numbers, and quite rightly."

The decision to push workers to work from home sparked dire warnings about the future of the city and downtown when corporate groups immediately asked the government to extend their vacation program, which is due to be completed in late October.

Mel Stride, Tory chairman of the Commons Treasury Committee, told the Prime Minister that lockdowns "destroy jobs and also personal well-being" when he urged the government to heed business concerns.

He said, "The fact that the lockdowns have harmed our economy means that a smaller economy is likely to have serious implications for the health of millions of people in our country in the years to come."

The five days of panic that paved the way for Boris Johnson to curfew on pubs

Thursday: The latest official data presented to ministers showed that coronavirus cases were increasing in all age groups, while hospital admissions increased across the board. The numbers are said to have prompted Michael Gove to call for decisive action. By the end of the day, a "consensus" had reportedly emerged on a plan for a complete shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors, with Mr Gove and Health Secretary Matt Hancock being the leading supporters. Advisors to the Emergency Scientific Advisory Group also backed the plans, arguing that it would not be possible to predict the effects of a less stringent curfew on pubs, bars and restaurants. Mr Johnson was reportedly initially in favor of a full shutdown.

Friday: The prospect of a complete shutdown terrified ministers and officials from the Treasury and the Ministry of Economy, Energy and Industrial Strategy, who feared the damage such a move would do to the economy. Chancellor Rishi Sunak is said to have asked the Prime Minister and the couple to meet on Friday afternoon. Mr Sunak has set out his fears personally and Mr Johnson appears to have agreed with the Chancellor’s message and asked officials to consider other options.

Saturdays and Sundays: Mr Johnson held further discussions with senior ministers, as well as Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty, as the Prime Minister tried to find an agreed path forward. Mr Johnson eventually decided to implement a curfew rather than a full shutdown as the "hawks" in the cabinet seemed to be winning the battle with the "pigeons".

Monday: The Prime Minister's latest lockdown plans were formally adopted by senior ministers ahead of an official announcement today.

He added: "Yes, we should listen very carefully to the epidemiologists, but we also have to listen very carefully to the Treasury, the companies and also the economists."

Plans for a partial return of sports fans to the stadiums from Oct. 1 have also been "put on hold" while the number of people allowed to attend weddings will be reduced to 15 as of Monday. Exceptions to the rule of six will also be reduced, banning indoor team sports such as five-player soccer games.

Mr Johnson did not announce a ban on mixing households indoors in England, but Nicola Sturgeon followed Northern Ireland this afternoon when she said Scots will no longer be able to meet in other people's homes starting tomorrow, raising questions about which of the home states which has adopted correct approach.

Some experts have already warned that the Prime Minister's curfew is not going far enough after senior scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance said yesterday that Britain could suffer 50,000 cases a day through mid-October and more than 200 deaths a day through November, provided Britain does not change course.

Calum Semple, professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the University of Liverpool and member of the government's scientific advisory group on emergencies (Sage), said there were "several areas of society that unfortunately need to tighten their restrictions".

It was alleged overnight that Mr Johnson initially advocated a full shutdown of the hospitality and leisure sectors before Chancellor Rishi Sunak persuaded him to take a less stringent course after warning of economic slaughter.

Elaborating his proposals to MPs in the House of Commons at lunchtime, Mr Johnson said the UK was at a "dangerous turning point" amid an increase in infections across the country.

He said, “This is the moment we need to act.

“If we can reduce the number of infections every day and bring the reproductive rate down to one, we can save lives, protect the NHS and the most vulnerable, and protect the economy from the far more stringent and costly measures that would inevitably become necessary later. & # 39;

Mr Johnson said workers who can work from home should do so now.

He told the Commons, “We must take action to suppress the disease. First we ask again office workers who can work from home to do this.

"In key public services and in all professions where home work is not an option, such builders or retailers should continue to work at their jobs."

He also set out an extension of the applicable face mask wearing regulations and told MPs: “We are expected to expand the requirement to wear face covers to retail employees, all taxi and private vehicle users, and indoor employees and customers. when you sit at a table to eat or drink. & # 39;

He added, “These rules, these measures will only work if people obey them, and there is nothing more frustrating for the vast majority who obey the law-abiding majority than to see some brash defying the rules.

Boris Johnson's 10pm curfew "is not enough," the SAGE advisor claims

Boris Johnson's 10 p.m. curfew for all pubs, bars and restaurants will not be enough to contain the spread of the coronavirus, one of the government's scientific advisors warned today.

University of Liverpool professor Calum Semple and member of SAGE said measures must "go further" to halt the UK's fast-growing outbreak.

And he said tighter restrictions are likely required on the hospitality sector, which hit back on the curfew today calling it "another crushing blow".

Professor Semple said, "In time, it will probably have to go beyond curfew and a 10pm table service." He also warned that ministers may have to consider reducing household mixing.

He said new measures could include keeping people on BBC Radio 4's Today program out of the office just minutes before Michael Gove confirmed the government is letting go of its back to work.

And Professor Semple added, “I think the rule of six has been tried, it hasn't been time to interfere, but based on the numbers I see it doesn't go far enough.

“The epidemiologists and scientists I work with, and I'm not just talking about the ones on SAGE, I'd say there's barely a thickness of cigarette paper between what we think about it.

& # 39; The time to act is now, we are in a serious situation and the rising numbers follow the current worst-case scenario.

He explained the situation at his local hospital in Wirral, Liverpool, warning that there were already several cases in the intensive care unit.

"We're seeing an increase in hospital admissions," he said. “I can tell you that our hospital on the Wirral has several cases in the intensive care unit.

“A study I did looking at hospital cases in England, Scotland and Wales shows a rapid increase in case admissions and, interestingly, we are actually seeing an increase in people between the ages of 20 and 40, especially women we have not seen before.

"And that suggests there's community exposure in hospitality and care facilities that we haven't seen before, likely because people under 50 are less invested in social distancing."

& # 39; So these rules are enforced through more severe penalties. We have already introduced a fine of up to £ 10,000 for those who cannot self-isolate and such fines will not be applied to companies that break Covid rules.

& # 39; The penalty for failing to wear a mask or breaking the Rule of Six now doubles to £ 200 for a first offense.

"We will provide the police and local authorities with the additional resources they need, an increased police presence on our streets and the ability to call on military assistance to release the police if necessary."

The Prime Minister's official spokesman later made it clear that military personnel could be used to occupy police offices and guard protected locations in order to release officials so they can enforce coronavirus rules.

The spokesman said soldiers would not replace the police in enforcement roles "and they would not hand out fines."

Mr Johnson also said the government will not hesitate to impose even stricter restrictions if the latest wave of measures fails to get the disease under control.

He said, "I must emphasize that we reserve the right to use greater firepower with far greater restrictions if all of our actions do not bring the R below one."

He added: "We will not listen to those who say they are ripping the virus apart, nor those who are calling for a permanent lockdown. We are taking decisive and appropriate steps to balance saving human life with protecting jobs and livelihoods. & # 39;

The revelation of the new restrictions immediately sparked business concerns, fears that they would inevitably lead to more job losses.

CBI Director General Dame Carolyn Fairbairn told the BBC: “There is now an urgent need to have a successor to the vacation program.

& # 39; It was a great success. It has saved thousands and thousands of jobs, but it faces a cliff. And now, with today's announcement, it is more urgent than ever.

& # 39; We call on the Ministry of Finance to announce a successor system very quickly. It should be more targeted. It doesn't have to be that generous. But if we want to protect jobs, this must be done in the medium term within days or weeks. This is urgent now. & # 39;

Ms. Fairbairn also said: "Avoiding the devastating blow cannot be avoided." The new proposals for working from home will bring businesses, especially those in city centers.

Confirming the shift in work from home this morning, Mr Gove told Sky News, “There will be a shift in emphasis and one of the things we're going to highlight is when people can be from home to work then we would encourage them to do so.

“Now it's important to emphasize that there are many, many, many roles that cannot be performed from home.

“There are people in manufacturing, construction, retail, and other roles that we see that this is simply impossible. That is why we have campaigned for you to have Covid-safe jobs and of course we have to balance the need to ensure that people continue to work and can actually continue to go to school critically, and to benefit from education, no action needs to be taken be to reduce the virus. That is why we try to limit or appropriately restrict social contact. & # 39;

He also said plans for a partial return of sports fans to the stadiums from October 1 have been "paused".

Michael Gove confirmed today that the government is getting rid of its back to work when he said people who can work from home should do so now

Michael Gove confirmed today that the government is getting rid of its back to work when he said people who can work from home should do so now

The decision to return to work is a detrimental moment for Mr Johnson who has actively encouraged workers to return to their offices. A London Underground is pictured this morning

The decision to return to work is a detrimental moment for Mr Johnson who has actively encouraged workers to return to their offices. A London Underground is pictured this morning

Thirty-two academics urge Boris Johnson to think twice about putting Britain into a second lockdown – as questions continue to surface about advisors' doomsday numbers

A group of scientists and doctors have written to the prime minister asking him not to opt for a second lockdown and to stop presenting Covid-19 as a deadly threat.

Thirty-two top scientists have urged Boris Johnson and his scientific and medical advisors to avoid jerky responses to rising cases and hospital stays.

They said the coronavirus debate was "not helpful" as it was split between people who want total bans and people who want no restrictions at all.

The researchers urged decision makers to take a step back and think carefully about what to do next. They said there was still no "easily observable pattern" between strict rules on social distancing and the number of people dying from coronavirus.

The open letter was written by Oxford's Professor Sunetra Gupta and Professor Carl Heneghan, Professor Karol Sikora of Buckingham University, and Sam Williams, director of the consulting firm Economic Insight.

Cancer physician Professor Sikora tweeted a copy of the letter today, pleading, "We urgently need a rethink to find a better balance."

It is heavily criticized by experts from the government's leading scientists after presenting a "doomsday" scenario of 50,000 daily coronavirus cases within a month – which was apparently not supported by data from France and Spain.

"Es ist der Fall, dass wir einige Open-Air-Veranstaltungsorte pilotiert haben, und wir möchten zu gegebener Zeit in der Lage sein, den Menschen die Rückkehr zum Fußball und zu anderen Sportereignissen zu ermöglichen", sagte er gegenüber BBC Breakfast.

"Aber es ist so, dass wir im Moment nur vorsichtig sein müssen, und ich denke, eine Masseneröffnung in dieser Phase wäre nicht angemessen."

Er fügte hinzu: „Es war der Fall, dass wir uns ein inszeniertes Programm mit mehr zurückkehrenden Menschen angesehen haben – es würde nicht der Fall sein, dass wir Stadien mit Fans haben würden.

„Wir schauen uns an, wie wir dieses Programm für den Moment anhalten können. Aber wir wollen sicherstellen, dass (wenn) die Umstände es erlauben, (wir) mehr Menschen zurückbekommen. & # 39;

Mr. Gove couldn't say how long the government's new coronavirus measures are expected to last.

"We hope that we can take appropriate steps now. If we can fight back the virus, we can gradually relax it in the future," he told BBC Breakfast.

"But what I can't do is predict with absolute certainty."

When asked if it would be months or weeks, Mr Gove said, "It is, as Professor Vallance and Chris Whitty pointed out yesterday, that we will have a challenge in the next six months."

Mr Gove insisted that the government take "reluctant steps" with the new coronavirus measures, but added that they were "absolutely necessary".

"There will be more details that the prime minister will set out and one of the points that he will make is that nobody wants to do these things, nobody wants to take these steps," he told Sky News.

“The steps we are taking are reluctant, but they are absolutely necessary.

"Because, as we were reminded yesterday, and as you reported, the infection rate is increasing, the number of people going to hospital is increasing and we have to act."

Er bestand darauf, dass es Beweise gibt, die die Entscheidung der Regierung unterstützen, die Ausgangssperre für Pubs und Restaurants um 22 Uhr festzulegen.

Er sagte gegenüber der BBC: „Es gibt Hinweise darauf, dass je länger die Veranstaltungsorte geöffnet bleiben, desto mehr soziale Vermischung stattfindet.

"Eine solche Einschränkung zu setzen, ist etwas, was wir bereits in Teilen des Landes getan haben, in denen sich das Virus besonders schnell verbreitet hat."

It was alleged overnight that Mr. Gove and Secretary of Health Matt Hancock pushed for the hospitality industry to be shut down completely.

Die Times berichtete über einen "Konsens", der sich am vergangenen Donnerstag um den Umzug mit Mitgliedern von Sage gebildet hatte, die ebenfalls an Bord waren, mit der Begründung, dass es nicht möglich sei, die Auswirkungen einer Ausgangssperre vorherzusagen.

The Prime Minister is said to have initially endorsed the shutdown plan, which caused concern within the Treasury Department and the Department of Economy, Energy and Industrial Strategy and prompted Mr. Sunak to request a meeting with Mr. Johnson.

Dieses Treffen fand am Freitag statt, als Herr Sunak vor dem wirtschaftlichen Schaden warnte, den eine vollständige Schließung des Gastgewerbes verursachen könnte, was dazu führte, dass Herr Johnson seine Meinung änderte und stattdessen die weniger strengen Ausgangssperren vorantrieb.

Official Downing Street slides showed that if the infection rate continued, there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day through mid-October, which could result in more than 200 deaths a day by mid-November

Official Downing Street slides showed that if the infection rate continued, there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day through mid-October, which could result in more than 200 deaths a day by mid-November

Michael Kill, executive director of the Night-Time Industries Association, warned the measures could spark a spate of unregulated events and house parties that are the real sources of infection attending frustrated young people who are denied access to a safe and legitimate night has been. Time hospitality places & # 39 ;.

Ian Wright, der Geschäftsführer der Food and Drink Federation, sagte: 'Diese neuen Beschränkungen für den fragilen britischen Gastgewerbe- und Lebensmitteldienstleistungssektor sind ein potenziell tödlicher Schlag für Hersteller, die sich auf die Belieferung des Gastgewerbes spezialisiert haben.

"Viele Pubs und Cafés werden nach diesen neuen Regeln nicht in der Lage sein, profitabel zu handeln, und müssen wieder schließen, wobei weitere Bedrohungen durch die erzwungene Schließung aufgrund lokaler oder nationaler Sperrungen drohen."

The measures also sparked a backlash from the Tory, with senior Conservative MP Sir Bernard Jenkin calling it a "terrible blow".

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “The people who run pubs, own pubs, are in a terrible strain.

"And the lifeline of loans and grants has kept these people almost afloat, and this is going to be a terrible blow for them."

He added, “The worst case scenario would be if we had to have another major lockdown. That would be terrible for the economy.

“Anything that can avoid or reduce this risk appears to be justified.

Er sagte, das Parlament müsse über die von der Regierung vorgeschlagenen Maßnahmen debattieren und abstimmen, nachdem seine Tory-Kollegen gestern Herrn Johnson beschuldigt hatten, "per Dekret zu entscheiden".

There are already fears that the government will have to impose further draconian restrictions in the coming weeks and months.

Professor Semple wurde im Today-Programm von BBC Radio 4 gefragt, ob er glaubt, dass die Ausgangssperre für Pubs und Bars um 22 Uhr ausreicht, um die Ausbreitung von Infektionen zu stoppen.

He replied: & # 39; No, it won't be. There are some areas of society where its restrictions unfortunately need to be tightened, but it is necessary now as cases are increasingly emerging not only in the frail elderly but also in those under 50. "

When asked what else could be affected by a clampdown soon, the Sage agent said, “We will potentially have to watch fewer sporting events and that will hit many of us hard as we enjoy football, boxing and other activities before especially in the north west of England.

"We'll likely see increased restrictions in the hospitality industry as time goes on. I think that curfew and table service probably only need to go through 10 am. I think that's very likely."

Der Gouverneur der Bank of England, Andrew Bailey, sagte heute, der Anstieg der Covid-19-Fälle sei "eine äußerst schwierige Nachricht für uns alle", aber die Bank sei bereit, Maßnahmen zu ergreifen, um Unternehmen zu schützen, wo dies möglich ist.

Nur fünf Prozent der Covid-Infektionen werden in Pubs und Restaurants weitergegeben

Die Minister wurden gewarnt, dass eine Ausgangssperre von 22 Uhr in Pubs und Restaurants für viele Unternehmen, die nach der ersten Welle von Covid-19 noch auf dem Wasser stehen, der letzte Nagel im Sarg sein wird.

Verärgerte Gastgewerbebosse befürchten, dass sie die Hauptlast von Boris Johnsons Vorgehen gegen Coronaviren tragen, wenn Regierungszahlen eine vergleichsweise geringe Ausbreitung der Krankheit in Lebensmittel- und Getränkegeschäften belegen.

Daten von Public Health England zeigen, dass von den 729 Ausbrüchen in der Woche bis zum 13. September nur fünf Prozent in Lebensmittelgeschäften wie Restaurants und Pubs auftraten – 45 Prozent in Pflegeheimen, 21 Prozent in Schulen und 18 Prozent an Orten der Arbeit.

Tim Martin, Gründer von Wetherspoons, sagte: „Die Ausgangssperre wird von einer intelligenten Person nicht einmal bis zu fünf Minuten in Betracht gezogen, denn wenn man sich die Statistiken ansieht, gibt es in Pubs relativ wenige Übertragungen von Infektionen.

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of trade body UK Hospitality, urged the Government to heed its own statistics because the curfew could take a sledgehammer to the industry which is already 'on its knees'.

She said this morning: 'People will think it's not that significant, but it really will have a big economic impact on jobs, not just on pubs, but also for cafes and restaurants.'

FTSE 100 claws back some losses after yesterday's £51bn plunge with markets opening 0.3% up by 38 points to 5,820 after 10pm curfew was announced for pubs and restaurants

The FTSE 100 clawed back ground this morning after the worst sell off since June saw more than £50billion wiped off the value of Britain's blue chip companies.

The index was 0.3 per cent in the green at opening today – up 38 points to 5,821 – a day after a £51bn plunge amid a market rout across Europe and America caused by a spike in Covid infections.

Pub chains and airlines were hammered as ministers warned of new rules to limit social contact, while banking shares slid amid fresh claims of money laundering.

Meanwhile, the pound slipped to a two-month low against the dollar today ahead of the restrictions.

Sterling fell 0.51 per cent to $1.2751 against the dollar, the lowest level since July 24 while the pound was down 0.25 per cent against the European common currency at 92 pence.

Speaking on a British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) webinar, Mr Bailey said: 'The latest news, that we are seeing a very unfortunate, faster return of Covid-19 is extremely difficult news for all of us and the whole country.

'That does reinforce the downside risks we have in our forecasts.

'The Bank of England will do everything we can do within our remit and powers to support the businesses and people of this country and we will do that.'

Elsewhere, Sir Keir Starmer said a second national lockdown would be a 'sign of Government failure, not an act of God' that would take an 'immense toll' on public health and the economy.

Sir Keir used his first Labour Party conference speech as leader to argue there should be 'nothing inevitable about a second lockdown'.

Speaking from Doncaster, he told the virtual party conference: 'The warnings yesterday from the Government's advisers were stark. They can't be ignored.

'Labour will act in the national interest. We will be a constructive opposition. We will support whatever reasonable steps are necessary to save lives and protect our NHS.

'But I also want to say this: There should be nothing inevitable about a second lockdown.

'It would be a sign of Government failure, not an act of God. It would take an immense toll on people's physical and mental health and on the economy. We need a national effort to prevent a national lockdown.'

Sir Keir also claimed the 'incompetence' of the Government is 'holding Britain back'.

He said: 'I think Britain has so much yet to achieve. And it angers me that this Government is holding us back.

'I've tried to be constructive. I appreciate that these are unprecedented times and that governing is difficult. I've tried to be fair, to give the Government the benefit of the doubt.

'But now, with one of the highest death rates in the world, and on the threshold of one of the deepest recessions anywhere, I'm afraid there is no doubt.

'This Government's incompetence is holding Britain back.'

The Prime Minister's announcement of new enforcement measures comes after the government's top two scientists painted a bleak picture of what could happen if the UK fails to get the coronavirus under control.

Sir Patrick said yesterday that there could be 50,000 new daily cases by October and more than 200 daily deaths by November – numbers which provoked anger from some scientific critics who suggested he was being far too negative.

Alongside Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, Sir Patrick said the "vast majority of the population are still susceptible to coronavirus" and that the current situation calls for swift action to reduce the number of cases.

Prof. Whitty suggested that reducing social contact was a key to containing the spread, but acknowledged that a balance had to be struck to protect the economy.

"The ministers who make the decisions – and society as a whole – have to find this very difficult balance," he said.

“If we do too little, this virus will spiral out of control and result in a significant number of direct and indirect deaths.

“However, if we go too far in the other direction, we can damage the economy, which can affect unemployment, poverty and deprivation. All of these have long-term health effects. So we have to keep these two sides in mind. & # 39;

He suggested that science would "ride to our rescue" at some point, but "in this time of the next six months, I think we must realize that we must collectively take this very seriously."

The four UK chief medical officers recommended raising the Covid alert level from three to four – the second highest – last night, suggesting the epidemic is in general circulation. Transmission is high or increasing exponentially.

Boris Johnson's coronavirus lockdown statement in full

Mr Speaker, with your permission, I will make a statement on our response to the rising number of Coronavirus cases and how we must act now to avoid still graver consequences later on.

At every stage in this pandemic we have struck a delicate balance between saving lives by protecting our NHS and minimising the wider impact of our restrictions.

And it is because of the common sense and fortitude of the British people that earlier this year we were able to avert an even worse catastrophe, forming a human shield around our NHS, and then by getting our country moving again by reopening key sectors of our economy and returning children to school.

But we always knew that while we might have driven the virus into retreat, the prospect of a second wave was real.

And I am sorry to say that – as in Spain and France and many other countries – we have reached a perilous turning point.

A month ago, on average around a thousand people across the UK were testing positive for Coronavirus every day.

The latest figure has almost quadrupled to 3,929.

Yesterday the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Scientific Adviser warned that the doubling rate for new cases could be between seven and 20 days with the possibility of tens of thousands of new infections next month.

I wish I could reassure the House that the growing number of cases is merely a function of more testing, but a rising proportion of the tests themselves are yielding a positive result.

I also wish I could say that more of our people now have the antibodies to keep the virus off, but the latest data suggest that fewer than 8 per cent of us are in this position.

It is true that the number of new cases is growing fastest amongst those aged 20-29,  but the evidence shows that the virus is spreading to other more vulnerable age groups, as we have seen in France and Spain where this has led to increased hospital admissions and, sadly, more deaths.

In the last fortnight, daily hospital admissions in England have more than doubled.

Tens of thousands of daily infections in October would, as night follows day, lead to hundreds of daily deaths in November and those numbers would continue to grow unless we act.

And as with all respiratory viruses, Covid is likely to spread faster as autumn becomes winter.

Yesterday, on the advice of the four Chief Medical Officers, the UK's Covid alert level was raised from 3 to 4, the second most serious stage, meaning that transmission is high or rising exponentially.

So this is the moment when we must act.

If we can curb the number of daily infections, and reduce the Reproduction rate to 1, then we can save lives, protect the NHS, and the most vulnerable, and shelter the economy from the far sterner and more costly measures that would inevitably become necessary later.

So we are acting on the principle that a stitch in time saves nine.

The Government will introduce new restrictions in England, carefully judged to achieve the maximum reduction in the R number with the minimum damage to lives and livelihoods.

I want to stress that this is by no means a return to the full lockdown of March. We are not issuing a general instruction to stay at home.

We will ensure that schools, colleges and universities stay open – because nothing is more important than the education, health and well-being of our young people. We will ensure that businesses can stay open in a Covid-compliant way.

However, we must take action to suppress the disease.

First, we are once again asking office workers who can work from home to do so.

In key public services – and in all professions where homeworking is not possible, such as construction or retail – people should continue to attend their workplaces.

And like Government, this House will be free to take forward its business in a Covid-secure way which you, Mr Speaker, have pioneered.

Second, from Thursday all pubs, bars and restaurants must operate table-service only, Mr Speaker, except for takeaways.

Together with all hospitality venues, they must close at 10pm.

To help the police to enforce this rule, I am afraid that means alas closing, and not just calling for last orders. Simplicity is paramount.

The same will apply to takeaways – though deliveries can continue thereafter.

I am sorry this will hurt many businesses just getting back on their feet, but we must act to stop the virus from being transmitted in bars and restaurants.

Third, we will extend the requirement to wear face coverings to include staff in retail, all users of taxis and private hire vehicles, and staff and customers in indoor hospitality, except when seated at a table to eat or drink.

Fourth, in retail, leisure, tourism and other sectors, our Covid-secure guidelines will become legal obligations.

Businesses will be fined and could be closed if they breach these rules.

Fifth, now is the time to tighten up the rule of six.

I'm afraid that from Monday, a maximum of 15 people will be able to attend wedding ceremonies and receptions.

Though, up to 30 can still attend a funeral as now.

We will also have to extend the rule of six to all adult indoor team sports.

Finally, we have to acknowledge that the spread of the virus is now affecting our ability to reopen business conferences, exhibitions and large sporting events so we will not be able to do this from 1 October.

And I recognise the implications for our sports clubs, which are the life and soul of our communities, and my RH Friends the Chancellor and Culture Secretary are working urgently on what we can do now to support them.

Mr Speaker, these rules measures will only work if people comply.

There is nothing more frustrating for the vast majority, the law-abiding majority that do comply than the sight of a few brazenly defying the rules. So these rules will be enforced by tighter penalties.

We have already introduced a fine of up to £10,000 for those who fail to self-isolate and such fines will now be applied to businesses breaking Covid rules.

The penalty for failing to wear a mask or breaking the rule of six will now double to £200 for a first offence.

We will provide the police and local authorities with the extra funding they need, a greater police presence on our streets, and the option to draw on military support where required to free up the police.

The measures I have announced all apply in England and the Devolved Administrations are taking similar steps.

I spoke yesterday with each of the First Ministers and again today and I thank them for their collaboration: the health of everyone in these islands depends on our common success.

Already about 13 million people across England are living under various local restrictions, over and above national measures.

We will continue to act against local flare-ups, working alongside councils and strengthening measures where necessary.

And I want to speak directly to those who were shielding early in the pandemic and may be anxious about being at greater risk.

Following advice from our senior clinicians, our guidance continues to be that you do not need to shield – except in local lockdown areas – and we will keep this under constant review.

I must emphasise that if all our actions fail to bring the R below 1, then we reserve the right to deploy greater firepower, with significantly greater restrictions.

I fervently want to avoid taking this step, as do the Devolved Administrations, but we will only be able to avoid it if our new measures work and our behaviour changes.

Mr Speaker, we will spare no effort in developing vaccines, treatments and new forms of mass-testing but unless we palpably make progress, we should assume that the restrictions I have announced will remain in place for perhaps six months.

For the time being, this virus is a fact of our lives and I must tell the House and the country that our fight against it will continue.

We will not listen to those who say let the virus rip; nor to those who urge a permanent lockdown; we are taking decisive and appropriate steps to balance saving lives with protecting jobs and livelihoods.

I know all of this will have profound consequences for our constituents, so the government will give the House every opportunity to scrutinise our decisions.

In addition to regular statements and debates, Hon Members will be able to question the government's scientific advisers more regularly, gain access to data about their constituencies, your constituencies and join daily calls with my RH Friend the Paymaster General.

After six months of restrictions, it would be tempting to hope that the threat has faded, and seek comfort in the belief that if you have avoided the virus so far then you are somehow immune.

I have to say that it is that kind of complacency that could be our undoing.

If we fail to act together now we will not only place others at risk but jeopardise our own futures with the more drastic action that we would inevitably be forced to take.

Mr Speaker, no British government would wish to stifle our freedoms in the ways that we have found necessary this year.

Yet even now we can draw some comfort from the fact that schools and universities and places of worship are staying open, shops can serve their customers, construction workers can go to building sites, and the vast majority of the UK economy can continue moving forwards.

We are also, Mr Speaker, better prepared for a second wave, with the ventilators, the PPE, the dexamethasone, the Nightingale Hospitals, and a hundred times as much testing.

So now it falls to each of us and every one of us to remember the basics – wash our hands, cover our faces, observe social distancing – and follow the rules.

Then we can fight back against this virus, shelter our economy from even greater damage, protect the most vulnerable in care homes and hospitals, safeguard our NHS and save many more lives.

And I commend this statement to the House.

Those new rules in full that will wipe out Christmas and New Year: Working from home is back, facemasks in pubs and restaurants – and will hairdressers and gyms be included in the Rule of Six?

Boris Johnson apologetically took a hammer to Britons' social lives today as he reintroduced lockdown measures in England to last possibly six months to see off a second wave of coronavirus.

Pubs and other leisure and hospitality businesses like restaurants will face a 10pm curfew from Thursday.

People working in retail, those travelling in taxis, and staff and customers in indoor hospitality will also have to wear face coverings – except while seated at a table to eat or drink.

And in a dramatic reversal of the Government's recent drive to get people back to workplaces, all office workers will be advised to work from home where they can as soon as possible.

In a grave Commons statement the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could last for six months – taking them well beyond Christmas – 'unless we palpably make progress'.

Here we look at the new rules that have been unveiled today:

PUBS AND RESTAURANTS

ENGLAND —

From this Thursday, pubs and restaurants will have to close at 10pm. This means last orders will have to take place some time after 9pm.

Customers will not be allowed to order drinks at the bar. All pubs and bars must become table service only, like restaurants.

This is a change from the current rules, where standing at the bar for a pint was allowed as long as there was social distancing in place.

It also applies to takeaway services, many of which sustained businesses through the worst of the original lockdown.

But food (and drink) deliveries are allowed to continue after 10am because it is easier to limit human contact.

In a grave Commons statement the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could last for six months - taking them well beyond Christmas - 'unless we palpably make progress'

In a grave Commons statement the Prime Minister warned that the new curbs could last for six months – taking them well beyond Christmas – 'unless we palpably make progress'

WALES, SCOTLAND AND NORTHERN IRELAND —

The same rules for England apply in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

IS THE 10PM CURFEW ECONOMICALLY DAMAGING?

The Prime Minister told the Commons 'the spread of the disease does tend to happen later at night after more alcohol has been consumed'.

In reply to Meg Hillier, Labour chairwoman of the Commons Public Accounts Committee he said: 'These are not easy decisions, nobody wants to be curtailing the right of restaurants and other businesses to go about their lawful business.

'What we have seen from the evidence is that alas the spread of the disease does tend to happen later at night after more alcohol has been consumed.

'This is one way that we see of driving down the R without doing excessive economic damage and that's the balance we have to strike.'

Ministers have been warned that a 10pm curfew on pubs and restaurants will be the 'final nail in the coffin' for many businesses still treading water after the first wave of Covid-19.

Exasperated hospitality bosses are fuming that they are bearing the brunt of Boris Johnson's coronavirus crackdown when Government figures show a comparably low spread of the disease in food and drink outlets.

Public Health England data reveals that of the 729 outbreaks in the week to September 13, only five per cent occurred in food outlets such as restaurants and pubs – 45 per cent were in care homes, 21 per cent in schools and 18 per cent in places of work.

People sit in a restaurant in Covent Garden in London today as the PM clobbered civil liberties

People sit in a restaurant in Covent Garden in London today as the PM clobbered civil liberties

Pubs like the French House in Soho, central London, will have to close at 10pm. That is not last orders at 10pm, that is close at 10pm.

Pubs like the French House in Soho, central London, will have to close at 10pm. That is not last orders at 10pm, that is close at 10pm.

Wetherspoons founder Tim Martin said: 'The curfew doesn't even stand up to five minutes consideration by an intelligent person because if you look at the stats… there are relatively few transfers of infections in pubs.'

The Government faced renewed calls to do more to support businesses, with the hospitality industry warning that the new restrictions would be a 'crushing blow'.

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of trade body UKHospitality, said: 'It is hard to understand how these measures are the solution to fighting the disease when Government data shows that just 5 per cent of infections out of the home are related to hospitality.'

Michael Kill, chief executive of the Night Time Industries Association, warned the measures could trigger 'a surge of unregulated events and house parties which are the real hot-beds of infection, attended by frustrated young people denied access to safe and legitimate night-time hospitality venues'.

Up to 6,000 jobs are being axed at Premier Inn owner Whitbread, which also operates the Beefeater pubs and Brewers Fayre chains.

The Wetherspoon pub chain also said it had written to its 1,000 airport staff to warn them that between 400 and 450 jobs are at risk of redundancy.

Officer workers have been told to work from home 'if possible' although those in 'key public services and in all professions' where this is not possible, such as construction and retail, should continue to go in

Officer workers have been told to work from home 'if possible' although those in 'key public services and in all professions' where this is not possible, such as construction and retail, should continue to go in

WORKING FROM HOME

Officer workers have been told to work from home 'if possible' although those in 'key public services and in all professions' where this is not possible, such as construction and retail, should continue to go in.

According to Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove: 'We are stressing that if it is safe to work in your workplace, if you are in a Covid-secure workplace, then you should be there if your job requires it.

'But, if you can work from home you should.'

The new message brings England into line with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, which have all advised people to work from home wherever possible throughout the pandemic.

If businesses are not Covid-secure, flout the mask regulations or break the Rule of Six, they will be fined £10,000 or closed down.

If people prevent others from self-isolating – such as bosses threatening redundancy – they can also be fined.

FACEMASKS

Face masks must be worn by customers in indoor hospitality and leisure venues, except while seated at a table to eat or drink.

Coverings must also be worn in taxis and private hire vehicles from tomorrow, and by retail staff at work — though most had already brought in this requirement anyway.

For people who do not wear face coverings, and who are not exempt, in places legally stated there are fines of £200 in England, or £60 in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.

The Prime Minister has also announced tougher enforcement measures, with businesses facing fines or closure for failing to comply with coronavirus rules, meaning there will be consequences for pubs that try to serve you at the bar.

Commuters walk across the London Bridge during the morning rush hour in September

Commuters walk across the London Bridge during the morning rush hour in September

A man enjoys a a drink at The Kings Ford pub in Chingford, East London, as the PM made his announcement in the Commons this afternoon

A man enjoys a a drink at The Kings Ford pub in Chingford, East London, as the PM made his announcement in the Commons this afternoon

National Police Chiefs' Council chairman Martin Hewitt said: 'Individuals, businesses and households all have a responsibility to ensure the virus is suppressed and police will play their part in supporting the public to navigate the measures in place for our safety.

'Our approach of engaging with people and explaining the regulations in place will remain. The vast majority of situations are resolved following those two stages, with little need for further encouragement or enforcement action to be taken,' he said.

'Police will continue to work with their communities and only issue fines as a last resort.

'Chiefs will be stepping up patrols in high-risk areas and will proactively work with businesses, licensing authorities and local authorities to ensure the rules are being followed.

'If members of the public are concerned that the law is being broken or they are experiencing anti-social behaviour, they can report this to the police, who will consider the most appropriate response and will target the most problematic behaviour.'

RULE OF SIX AND SELF-ISOLATION

The Rule of Six has been extended to take in 'leisure, entertainment, tourism and close contact' sectors'. The later includes hairdressers and other beauty treatments.

More details are awaited on what else specifically it will mean for places like gyms, although Mr Johnson today banned indoor group sports like five-a-side football.

So it means that currently hairdressers, nail bars and beauty salons can still operate, but they will need to cut still further the number of people they can serve at any one time.

Anyone who breaks the rules on social gatherings in England will be fined £200 with the penalty doubling on each further repeat offence up to £3,200.

Businesses that break the Rule of Six will be fined £10,000 or closed down.

Further guidance is expected on the specifics of this but has yet to be published by the Government.

People with coronavirus symptoms who do not self-isolate will face fines of £1,000, rising to £10,000 for repeat offences from September 28.

SCHOOLS

Schools will remain unaffected by the new restrictions. Along with protecting the economy, one of the main thrusts of today's announcements is the Government's desire to prioritise keeping schools open.

Mr Johnson said: 'I want to stress that this is by no means a return to the full lockdown of March. We are not issuing a general instruction to stay at home.

'We will ensure that schools, colleges and universities stay open – because nothing is more important than the education, health and well-being of our young people. We will ensure that businesses can stay open in a Covid-compliant way.'

WEDDINGS AND FUNERALS

From next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England have to be capped at 15 people — down from 30 people.

But funeral services are exempt from the new restrictions, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30.

Celebrations held this weekend will narrowly avoid the new restrictions.

Setting out the measures in the House of Commons, Mr Johnson said: 'Fifth, now is the time to tighten up the Rule of Six.

'I'm afraid that from Monday a maximum of 15 people will be able to attend wedding ceremonies and receptions, though up to 30 can still attend a funeral as now.'

From next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England have to be capped at 15 people — down from 30 people. But funeral services are exempt from the new restrictions, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30

From next Monday, wedding ceremonies and receptions in England have to be capped at 15 people — down from 30 people. But funeral services are exempt from the new restrictions, with the maximum number of mourners remaining at 30

Current guidance states that up to 30 attendees are permitted in Wales, while in Scotland, ceremonies and receptions are limited to 20 people, and numbers are dependent on the venue in Northern Ireland.

One bride, due to get married on December 12 after being engaged for five years, who had originally planned a wedding with 100 people in Norfolk, said she felt 'gutted' following the announcement.

'We are then seeing people say online that it doesn't matter, it's not important and at least we don't have Covid and then we feel like our feelings are not valid,' 40-year-old Laura Brown told the PA news agency.

'It's a day but it's so much more than a day, because of all the emotions that go into it.'

Meanwhile, self-employed wedding celebrant Chris Gray, from Glasgow, called the restrictions around weddings 'nonsensical', such as couples being required to wear coverings during the ceremony.

The 29-year-old added: 'That's led so many people having to cancel or rearrange weddings and in the short-term it's been an absolute hammer blow for cash flow for me.'

OTHER PUBLIC SPACES

SPORTS MATCHES

In England, a maximum of six people can take part in indoor team sports. However, large sports events and conferences will not take place from October 1, as previously planned.

Mr Johnson announced that the planned return of spectators to sports venues in England could be on hold for six months, raising the prospect of months more of games behind closed doors.

A number of pilot test events, in which capacities have been capped at 1,000, have taken place and it was hoped venues would be allowed to welcome more spectators from the start of October.

In England, a maximum of six people can take part in indoor team sports. However, large sports events and conferences will not take place from October 1, as previously planned

In England, a maximum of six people can take part in indoor team sports. However, large sports events and conferences will not take place from October 1, as previously planned

In England, a maximum of six people can take part in indoor team sports. However, large sports events and conferences will not take place from October 1, as previously planned

In England, a maximum of six people can take part in indoor team sports. However, large sports events and conferences will not take place from October 1, as previously planned

But the PM set out a range of tough new restrictions for England designed to limit the spread of Covid-19.

'We have to acknowledge that the spread of the virus is now affecting our ability to reopen business conferences, exhibitions and large sporting events,' he told the House of Commons.

'So we will not be able to do this from October 1 and I recognise the implications for our sports clubs which are the life and soul of our communities, and… the Chancellor and the Culture Secretary are working urgently on what we can do now to support them.'

He said the measures being announced on Tuesday would remain in place for 'perhaps six months'.

It is a devastating blow to sporting organisations, many of whom rely heavily on match-day revenue for survival, and there have already been calls from governing bodies for the government to provide emergency funding.

Professional sport, including the Premier League and Test cricket, has largely been played behind closed doors since it returned following the coronavirus shutdown earlier this year.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport confirmed all pilot events scheduled for September had now been cancelled. They will now take place with no fans.

In a statement this afternoon, the Premier League said fans would be 'as safe or even safer than at any other public activity currently permitted'.

'The Premier League notes the Government's announcement today and while the health of the nation must remain everyone's priority, we are disappointed that the safe return of supporters to matches has been postponed,' it said.

'The Premier League is certain that, through League-wide guidelines and a code of conduct developed with scientific experts and agreed by the Government's Sports Ground Safety Authority, fans in stadiums will be as safe or even safer than at any other public activity currently permitted. This is already evident in other European leagues.'

How long will the new restrictions be in place for?

The new restrictions brought in today could last for six months – but Mr Johnson has insisted they are not a return to the national lockdown seen in March.

He said: 'For the time being, this virus is a fact of our lives and I must tell the House and the country that our fight against it will continue.

'We will not listen to those who say let the virus rip, nor those who urge a permanent lockdown. We are taking decisive and appropriate steps to balance saving lives with protecting jobs and livelihoods.'

Many families will be anxious for Christmas after hearing the new rules – but ministers have insisted they do not want to ruin the holiday season.

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