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The interactive world map shows the countries that are most cautious about vaccines


An interactive map has shown how many people think the vaccines are unsafe and raised concerns about whether people would receive a Covid-19 bump.

Researchers from the UK, US and Belgium compiled data from surveys of nearly 300,000 people in 149 countries to identify vaccine hotspots.

They found that European countries were among the most untrustworthy. Only one in five people in Lithuania and Albania agreed that vaccines are safe.

In Ukraine and Turkey, three quarters of the population believe that impacts can damage their health in the long term.

In the UK, confidence has increased over the past year, but still just over half (52 percent) agree that shocks are safe.

In the United States, Canada, and Australia, more than 60 percent of people believed in government vaccination programs.

Scientists behind the research said scientists and public health experts around the world "need to work much better to build public confidence in the safety of vaccination," especially in hopes of a COVID-19 -Vaccine.

A vaccine is a hope that politicians and scientists around the world stick to their plans with no evidence that the coronavirus will go away until one is found.

In the UK, confidence increased over the past year, but just over half (52 percent) agreed that shocks were safe. In the United States, Canada, and Australia, more than 60 percent of people believed in government vaccination programs

Europe's caution with vaccines: only one in five people in Lithuania and Albania agree that vaccines are safe. In Ukraine, three quarters of the population believe that impacts are harmful to their health in the long term

Europe's caution with vaccines: only one in five people in Lithuania and Albania agree that vaccines are safe. In Ukraine, three quarters of the population believe that impacts are harmful to their health in the long term

The research was carried out by teams from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Imperial College London, University of Washington, and Antwerp University in Belgium.

The scientists analyzed data from 290 nationally representative surveys carried out between September 2015 and December 2019.

Modeling was used to gauge trends in public perception about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines and the importance of vaccinating children.

Poland was one of the countries in Europe where confidence in the safety of vaccines has been "lost" "significantly" – down from 64 percent who firmly believe vaccines are safe in November 2018 to 53 percent by December 2019.

The researchers attribute the loss of confidence to "the growing impact of a highly organized local anti-vaccine movement".

However, they found that confidence in vaccine safety is increasing in other European countries besides the UK, including Finland, France, Italy and Ireland.

In France, confidence in vaccines rose from 22 percent of respondents who strongly agree that vaccines are safe in 2018 to 30 percent in 2019.

In contrast, six countries, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Indonesia, Nigeria, Pakistan and Serbia, saw "significant increases" in people who disagree with vaccines.

In Azerbaijan, the proportion of those who disagree that vaccines are safe increased from 2 percent in 2015 to 17 percent in 2019.

The researchers described the loss of confidence as a "worrying trend," with negative attitudes reflecting political instability and religious extremism.

Indonesia saw one of the biggest public trust losses between 2015 and 2019, with the absolute difference in perceptions of safety decreasing by 14 percentage points, the team said.

10 COUNTRIES WITH MINIMUM CONFIDENCE IN VACCINES

(Percentage of the population who strongly agree that vaccines are safe)

  1. Japan 17%
  2. Lithuania 18%
  3. Albania 19%
  4. Hong Kong 21%
  5. Russia 23%
  6. Taiwan 25.5%
  7. China 26%
  8. Ukraine 26%
  9. Turkey 27%
  10. Mongolia 27%

10 COUNTRIES THAT TRUST IN VACCINES

(Percentage of the population who strongly agree that vaccines are safe)

  1. Uganda 87%
  2. Bangladesh 85%
  3. Liberia 83%
  4. Burundi 83%
  5. Namibia 83%
  6. India 82%
  7. Madagascar 81.5%
  8. Syria 81%
  9. Uzbekistan 81%
  10. Gambia 81%

They believe negative attitudes were in part sparked by Muslim leaders who questioned the safety of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine.

The results, published in the prestigious journal The Lancet, also raise questions about people's willingness to receive a Covid-19 vaccination should any of the candidates currently in trials prove successful.

In 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared vaccine reluctance to be one of the top ten major threats to global health.

As the race to find a Covid-19 vaccine continues, the authors said regular public attitudes and acting quickly amid falling confidence "must be a top priority to have the best chance of getting new life-saving vaccines to ensure ". .

Professor Heidi Larson of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, who led the research, said, “With new and emerging disease threats like the Covid-19 pandemic, it is important that we regularly monitor public attitudes to countries and groups quickly identified with decreasing confidence so we can help build confidence to optimize uptake of new life saving vaccines. & # 39;

Professor Larson and her team are currently collecting data on public attitudes towards a Covid-19 vaccine through surveys across the UK and worldwide.

She said initial numbers show willingness varied across the UK. "For example, in late March in the UK, only 5 percent of the population – when death rates were high – said (who) they would not take a Covid-19 vaccine," she said.

“ (In) June, which had risen to about 15 percent as death rates fell – because people are constantly weighing the impending threat of the disease and the risk of a brand new vaccine so that will be part of their decision-making criteria. & # 39;

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