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The headmistress says she didn't have to persuade the staff to return to school


A headmistress said "none of her employees had to be persuaded" to get back to work next week, and despite being "afraid" of the coronavirus crisis, "they want to do their job".

Boris Johnson announced yesterday that the gradual reopening of primary schools in England will start on Monday as planned. The first and sixth grade students are the first to return to the classroom.

Worcester Elementary School principal Bryony Baynes appeared on Good Morning Britain and discussed the decision with North London's child psychologist and educational expert Laverne Antrobus and Kent's parent Ben Anderson.

Bryony explained that her staff were "brilliant" throughout the ban, while Laverne, 53, said that children are "incredibly adaptable" and feel that they will quickly adapt to changes made to theirs Allow return.

Child psychologist and educational expert Laverne Antrobus (photo) from north-west London believes that children will quickly adapt to the changes during the pandemic

The teacher said: “The whole time was difficult for everyone, employees, parents and children. My biggest job is to reassure parents, employees and children.

“Although it's new, it can be safe, fun, and exciting. You don't have to feel like you're getting into something that will be scary. & # 39;

When asked about her employees' reaction to the decision, she said, “To be fair, my employees were incredible.

"I didn't have to convince anyone and they were brilliant. We were open on the way through the block and had staff in a rota. I had no staff who refused to come in.

Boris Johnson announced that the gradual reopening of primary schools in England will start on Monday as planned, and the panel discussed whether they feel comfortable with the decision

Boris Johnson announced that the gradual reopening of primary schools in England will start on Monday as planned, and the panel discussed whether they feel comfortable with the decision

Bryony Baynes, head of a primary school in Worcester (pictured), appeared on Good Morning Britain and said "none of her employees had to be persuaded" to get back to work next week

Bryony Baynes, head of a primary school in Worcester (pictured), appeared on Good Morning Britain and said "none of her employees had to be persuaded" to get back to work next week

Laverne has acted as a child advisor for Channel Four and BBC and agreed that young students respond flexibly to their surroundings

Laverne has acted as a child advisor for Channel Four and BBC and agreed that young students respond flexibly to their surroundings

"Obviously they are worried and one of my teaching assistants said:" I'm scared, I'm scared, but it's my job and I want to do it. "It's about realizing that employees are fearful. & # 39;

Laverne, who has acted as a child advisor for Channel Four and the BBC, agreed that while young students will have a different class system due to the crisis, they will be able to respond flexibly to their surroundings.

She said, "I think children are incredibly adaptable and what they are going to enter is a different class system, but they will go through it and say," So let's do it together. "

She added, "Actually, I think they'll adapt quickly, and as far as I know, the teachers I've spoken to won't wear PPE unless they do certain jobs around the kids."

Ben Anderson, Kent, said that because of the constant flow of communication from his son's school, he felt more comfortable sending him back

Ben Anderson, Kent, said that because of the constant flow of communication from his son's school, he felt more comfortable sending him back

Also included was parent Ben Anderson, whose son Arlo will be returning to school, and said that he felt more comfortable sending him back due to the constant flow of communication from his son's school.

He said: & # 39; with Arlo were 50/50. Much of our trust can be traced back to consistent communication with the school. They explained that changes will take place but are not entirely drastic. & # 39;

He continued on reports of strict social distance measures being taken in primary schools: "We don't expect anything so scary at our school.

“During the lock-up period, Arlo was aware that things are very different. We tried not to overwhelm him with information.

"He is very keen to return, excited to see his friends, and we felt comfortable – given the steps taken in our school, we felt comfortable with it."

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