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The Greggs bakery chain announces that it will cut over 800 jobs


Greggs has announced plans to cut 820 jobs during the pandemic after the boss warned that "Covid's trading terms forced this action on the company".

CEO Roger Whiteside warned the bakery chain "will not be profitable as a business" if sales continue at the rates they had during the lockdown.

The Newcastle-based chain said in late September it had talks with staff to cut working hours to minimize job losses when the vacation program is expected to end in October.

Greggs has announced plans to cut more than 800 jobs as part of the coronavirus pandemic (archive image)

In a statement posted on Greggs' employee information website earlier this week, Managing Director Roger Whiteside said: & # 39; Covid's trading terms have forced this action on our business and we are all very saddened by the need to move forward 820 friends and colleagues to separate. Many of them have been working with us for many years. & # 39;

He went on to say that "the battle with Covid is not over and is getting worse" as lockdown measures continue to be put in place across the UK's four nations.

Mr. Whiteside added, "With blocked sales, despite all of the mitigating measures we have put in place, Greggs will not be profitable as a company and there can be no room for complacency."

CEO Roger Whiteside (pictured in 2016) warned that the bakery chain "will not be profitable as a company" if sales continue on the terms they have suspended

CEO Roger Whiteside (pictured in 2016) warned that the bakery chain "will not be profitable as a company" if sales continue on the terms they have suspended

At the time, he told reporters, "Some stores have staff hours that do not meet current demand. But others are still a long way off and urgently need to be changed. & # 39;

The popular British bakery chain, famous for its sausage rolls and vegetable pies, was founded in 1939 as Tyneside bakery and has over 2,000 branches.

It comes after retailer WH Smith suffered a loss of £ 226 million in the past 12 months due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The Newcastle-based chain said in late September it had talks with staff to cut working hours to minimize job losses when the vacation program is expected to end in October. Pictured: Greggs in Slough, Berkshire

The Newcastle-based chain said in late September it had talks with staff to cut working hours to minimize job losses when the vacation program is expected to end in October. Pictured: Greggs in Slough, Berkshire

Their pre-tax loss is due to forecasters previously calling 2020 the depreciation year for WH Smith.

The stationery retailer previously announced that up to 1,500 jobs could be cut amid warnings from analysts at Investec who had previously expected a loss of £ 73 million.

Around 300 of the 1,600 stores were opened after the initial lockdown – mostly in hospitals and with attached post offices – but this time around, the chain is expected to be better protected after the newsagents got the green light to stay open.

WH Smith said it lost £ 226 million before taxes in the twelve months ended August, an increase from a profit of £ 135 million a year earlier. In the picture a shop in London in August

WH Smith said it lost £ 226 million before taxes in the twelve months ended August, an increase from a profit of £ 135 million a year earlier. In the picture a shop in London in August

However, in August, the 228-year-old company announced that the dramatic drop in sales could result in around 11 percent of its workforce being laid off.

It was a grim announcement for an already hammered main street after that Hundreds of jobs were also cut at the high street fashion chain M & Co.

The chain also announced the closure of 47 stores, bringing the number of workers laid off due to the Covid crisis above 100,000.

Within a week, 651 rolls were lost at Byron, 1,700 at DW Sports, 878 at Hays Travel and 1,100 at Pizza Express.

And when England was locked again this month, more job losses were announced as shops had to close again.

The second lockdown, which required closing all "non-essential" retailers, also fell before Christmas, when many companies were making most of their annual profits.

John Lewis cut another 1,500 jobs and the 1,300 jobs when eight stores were permanently closed in July. The picture of John Lewis in Westfield, Stratford, London was closed ahead of the four-week national lockdown

John Lewis cut another 1,500 jobs and cut the 1,300 jobs when eight stores were permanently closed in July. The picture of John Lewis in Westfield, Stratford, London was closed ahead of the four-week national lockdown

It was the The final blow in the bloodbath that is eating retail outlets following the Covid-19 outbreak.

As a result, John Lewis cut another 1,500 jobs and cut the 1,300 jobs when eight stores were permanently closed in July.

The retail giant was widely regarded as the benchmark for high street performance in the UK.

Lloyds Bank also announced its decision to lay off 1,070 additional employees in addition to the 865 at the start of the pandemic.

Within the same 24 hours, Marks & Spencer also reported its first loss in 94 years as a public company. The company had already cut 8,000 employees since March.

Shops and restaurants under pressure after the coronavirus pandemic were forced to close, and boarded-up shops were not an uncommon sight on the high street. Pictured: London's normally busy Old Compton Street

Shops and restaurants under pressure after the coronavirus pandemic were forced to close, and boarded-up shops were not an uncommon sight on the high street. Pictured: London's normally busy Old Compton Street

And Sainsbury & # 39; s also confirmed it would cut around 3,500 jobs in its Argos stores and supermarket for meat, fish and deli, while Clarks Shoes is taking note of the jobs of all 4,000 of its shop staff as part of its struggle to survive would.

With the bailout package created for the high street giant, the Clark family lost a majority stake in the company for the first time since it was founded nearly 200 years ago.

More than a million jobs are expected to be lost before Christmas, even before the last lockdown was announced, bringing unemployment above 2.5 million.

Sainsbury & # 39; s announced that 3,500 jobs were cut last week as John Lewis, Clarks and Lloyds Bank reported potential job losses

Sainsbury & # 39; s announced the cut of 3,500 jobs last week as John Lewis, Clarks and Lloyds Bank reported potential job losses

And analysis by the Local Data Company and Springboard suggests that covid could leave up to 18,000 stores on the UK high street empty as vacancies climb to their highest level since 2013.

With England under a second lockdown until December 2nd, ministers have been warned that retailers are facing a £ 8 billion loss as they lose important Christmas sales.

Non-essential stores were forced to close, and some supermarkets, including Tesco, blocked off parts of their stores that contained non-essential items.

Clothing and electronics stores, among other things, have had to close since last Thursday.

Grocery stores, supermarkets and garden centers could remain open.

Large companies have announced nearly 219,000 job losses since the lockdown began in March. The government has extended its vacation program to March as it predicts a "difficult" winter

Large companies have announced nearly 219,000 job losses since the lockdown began in March. The government has extended its vacation program to March as it predicts a "difficult" winter

Tom Ironside, Director of Policy at the British Retail Consortium, told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “(The government) has decided that some types of retailers, supermarkets and pharmacies can trade, and that's right, but we're thinking some of the restrictions are really pretty arbitrary.

& # 39; The timing of this lockdown is clearly extremely difficult for retailers. For many retailers, this is the golden quarter and it is extremely difficult to lose a month of sales during this period.

"We estimate those not classified as essential will lose 2 billion pounds a week during this new lockdown."

Last week, Rishi Sunak announced that the government's vacation program would be extended until March, as he warned companies of a "difficult" winter.

As noted nearly 219,000 job losses from major UK companies since the lockdown began

Since the coronavirus lockdown began in March, major UK employers have cut 215,471 jobs as follows:

  • November 13 – Greggs – 820
  • November 5 – Sainsbury & # 39; s and Argos – 3,500
  • November 4th – John Lewis – 1,500
  • November 4th – Lloyds – 1,070
  • October 29 – Pizza Express – 1,300
  • October 7 – Greene King – 800
  • October 6 – Virgin Money – 400
  • October 6 – Vp – 150
  • October 5 – Cineworld – 5,500 (many cuts probably temporary)
  • September 30th – TSB – 900
  • September 30th – Shell – 9,000 worldwide
  • September 29 – Ferguson – 1,200
  • September 22nd – Wetherspoon – 400 to 450
  • September 22 – Whitbread – 6,000
  • September 18 – Investec – 210
  • September 15 – Waitrose – 124
  • September 14 – London City Airport – 239
  • September 9 – Lloyds Bank – 865
  • September 9 – Pizza Hut – 450
  • September 4 – Virgin Atlantic – 1,150
  • September 3 – Costa – 1.650
  • August 27 – Pret a Manger – 2,800 (including 1,000 announced on July 6)
  • Aug 26 – Gatwick Airport – 600
  • August 25 – Cooperative Bank – 350
  • August 20 – Alexander Dennis – 650
  • August 18 – Bombardier – 95
  • Aug 18 – Marks & Spencer – 7,000
  • August 14th – Yo! Sushi – 250
  • August 14 – River Island – 350
  • August 12 – NatWest – 550
  • August 11th – InterContinental Hotels – 650 worldwide
  • August 11 – Debenhams – 2,500
  • August 7 – evening standard – 115
  • August 6 – Travelex – 1,300
  • August 6 – Wetherspoons – 110 to 130
  • August 5 – M & Co – 380
  • 5 August – Arsenal FC – 55
  • August 5 – WH Smith – 1,500
  • August 4th – Dixons Carphone – 800
  • August 4 – Pizza Express – 1,100 at risk
  • August 3 – Hays Travel – up to 878
  • August 3 – DW Sports – 1,700 at risk
  • July 31 – Byron – 651
  • July 30th – Pendragon – 1,800
  • July 29 – Waterstones – unknown number of functions at headquarters
  • July 28 – Selfridges – 450
  • July 27 – Oak Furnitureland – 163 Endangered
  • July 23 – Dyson – 600 in the UK, 300 overseas
  • July 22 – Mears – less than 200
  • July 20 – Marks & Spencer – 950 Endangered
  • July 17 – Azzurri Group (owns Zizzi and Ask Italian) – up to 1,200
  • July 16 – Genting – 1,642 endangered
  • July 16 – Burberry – 150 in the UK, 350 overseas
  • July 15 – Banks Mining – 250 Endangered
  • July 15 – Buzz Bingo – 573 Endangered
  • July 14th – Vertu – 345 July 14th – DFS – up to 200 endangered
  • July 9 – General Electric – 369
  • July 9 – Eurostar – unknown number
  • July 9 – boots – 4,000
  • July 9 – John Lewis – 1,300 Endangered
  • July 9 – Burger King – 1,600 endangered
  • July 7 – Reach (owns Daily Mirror and Daily Express) – 550
  • July 6 – Pret a Manger – 1,000 endangered
  • July 2 – Casual Dining Group (owns Bella Italia and Cafe Rouge) – 1,909
  • July 1 – SSP (owns Upper Crust) – 5,000 at risk
  • July 1 – Arcadia (owns TopShop) – 500
  • July 1 – Harrods – 700
  • July 1 – Virgin Money – 300
  • June 30 – Airbus – 1.700
  • June 30 – TM Lewin – 600
  • June 30 – Smiths Group – "some job losses"
  • June 25 – Royal Mail – 2,000
  • June 24th – Jet2 – 102
  • June 24th – Swissport – 4,556
  • June 24 – Crest Nicholson – 130
  • June 23 – Schuhzone – unknown number of workstations in the headquarters
  • June 19 – Aer Lingus – 500
  • June 17 – HSBC – UK jobs unknown, 35,000 worldwide
  • June 15 – Jaguar Land Rover – 1,100
  • June 15 – Travis Perkins – 2,500
  • June 12th – Le Pain Quotidien – 200
  • June 11 – Heathrow – at least 500
  • June 11 – Bombardier – 600
  • June 11 – Johnson Matthey – 2,500
  • June 11 – Centrica – 5,000
  • June 10 – Quiz – 93
  • June 10 – The restaurant group (owns Frankie and Benny & # 39; s) – 3,000
  • June 10 – Monsoon Accessorise – 545
  • June 10 – Everest Windows – 188
  • June 8 – BP – 10,000 worldwide
  • June 8 – Mulberry – 375
  • June 5th – Victoria's Secret – 800 in danger
  • June 5 – Bentley – 1,000
  • June 4th – Aston Martin – 500
  • June 4 – Lookers – 1,500
  • May 29 – Belfast International Airport – May 45
  • May 28 – Debenhams (in the second announcement) – Hundreds of jobs
  • May 28 – EasyJet – 4,500 worldwide
  • May 26 – McLaren – 1,200
  • May 22 – Carluccio – 1,000
  • May 21 – Clarks – 900
  • May 20 – Rolls-Royce – 9,000
  • May 20 – Bovis Homes – unknown number
  • May 19 – Ovo Energy – 2,600
  • May 19 – antlers – 164
  • May 15 – JCB – 950 Endangered
  • May 13 – Tui – 8,000 worldwide
  • May 12 – Carnival UK (owns P&O Cruises and Cunard) – 450
  • May 11th – P&O Ferries – 1,100 worldwide
  • May 5 – Virgin Atlantic – 3,150
  • May 1st – Ryanair – 3,000 worldwide
  • April 30 – Oasis Warehouse – 1,800
  • April 29 – WPP – unknown number
  • April 28 – British Airways – 12,000
  • April 23 – Saffron Seats – 400
  • April 23 – Meggitt – 1,800 worldwide
  • April 21 – Cath Kidston – 900
  • April 17 – Debenhams – 422
  • March 31 – Laura Ashley – 268
  • Mar 30 – BrightHouse – 2,400 Endangered
  • March 27 – Chiquito – 1,500 endangered

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