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The great white shark soars 15 feet through the air as it records the highest waterfall ever


The great white shark soars 15 feet in the air as the highest waterfall of all time is captured in a fascinating photo from South Africa

  • Scientist Chris Fallows took the picture on Seal Island in South Africa as part of the series & # 39; Air Jaws & # 39; done at Shark Week
  • "A picture is worth a thousand words. Well, this picture is worth a thousand fractions, ”Fallows said. "I can't believe how high it came out, it was just perfect … a photo you dream of."
  • The stunning shot marked the 20th anniversary and was a record 15 feet out of the water

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A fascinating photo of a great white shark hanging 15 feet in the air set a record for the highest ever breakthrough through the water.

Shark expert Chris Fallows captured the shot on Seal Island, South Africa and was released as part of the Discovery Channel's & # 39; Air Jaws & # 39; series.

"A picture is worth a thousand words. Well, this picture is worth a thousand fractions, ”Fallows said. "I can't believe how high it came out, it was just perfect … a photo you dream of."

"This has to be the ultimate air cheek injury," Fallows added.

Shark expert Chris Fallows captured the shot on Seal Island, South Africa and was released as part of the Discovery Channel's & # 39; Air Jaws & # 39; series.

Chris Fallows broke a Shark Week record when he took a picture of a great white man floating 15 feet in the air. The breathtaking moment captured on Seal Island in South Africa was released as part of Air Jaws, a series that began in 2001.

Chris Fallows broke a Shark Week record when he snapped a picture of a great white man floating 15 feet in the air. The breathtaking moment captured on Seal Island in South Africa was released as part of Air Jaws, a series that began in 2001.

In the latest installment of Air Jaws, researchers tracked sharks and used various techniques to detect breaks through the water's surface.

One used a drone, another attempted to capture a breach at night while Fallows used a purpose-built tow camera.

The Fallows record shot came fittingly on the 20th anniversary of the Air Jaws series.

"That last injury !!!" A Shark Week fan tweeted.

In the latest installment of Air Jaws, researchers tracked sharks and used various techniques to detect breaks through the water's surface.

In the latest installment of Air Jaws, researchers tracked sharks and used various techniques to detect breaks through the water's surface.

'A 15-foot injury? Absolutely breathtaking, ”wrote another.

And one user simply said, & # 39; Absolutely beautiful! That was great! & # 39;

South African-born Fallows, along with a colleague, were the first to observe great white shark behavior popularized by the Air Jaws show.

Since then, he has compiled one of the largest databases of predatory events involving the species and cataloged around 9,500 incidents.

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