ENTERTAINMENT

The government rejects the demand that over 40s should pay more taxes


Downing Street rejects the claim that it is planned to force everyone over the age of 40 to pay more taxes to fund the social care system

  • The policy has been reportedly reviewed by the Ministry of Health
  • But Downing Street said this afternoon that it was "not true that we think about it"
  • No10 said Boris Johnson was "taking the time" to get the welfare reform right

Downing Street rejected reports today that the government plans to force everyone over 40 to pay more taxes to fund their social welfare.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman said it was "not true that we think about this policy."

Boris Johnson promised in the 2019 Conservative Manifesto to present a strategy to reform the creaking social care sector.

However, the spokesman said the prime minister would "take the time" to ensure that the proposed overhaul is both "fair" and "sustainable" before making his proposals public.

Downing Street rejected reports today that over 40-year-olds should be forced to pay more for social security funding (Image)

The Guardian reported last night that the government wanted to urge over 40-year-olds to pay more taxes to fund the cost of caring for them later in life.

The radical plans are said to be part of a series of proposals to tackle the UK social security crisis.

The Prime Minister is under pressure to come up with a solution to the problem that he pledged to "fix once and for all" more than a year ago.

He wants to end the injustice in which thousands of older people are forced to sell their homes to cover their care costs because they are considered too rich to qualify for council-funded care.

The prime minister is said to have asked officials to develop a system that would spread the cost to those who need expensive care, which can exceed £ 1,400 a week, with the wider population.

According to a proposal, anyone over the age of 40 could be asked to pay an additional levy, either through taxes, social security, or a private system that forced them to take out health care insurance.

The Guardian said health minister Matt Hancock was promoting the idea, which is based on programs in Japan and Germany, but sources close to the cabinet minister rejected the proposal.

In Japan, people from the age of 40 pay an additional tax on social welfare.

In Germany, people start paying 1.5 percent of their salary into a dedicated fund at the start of their work, with employers making corresponding contributions.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman was asked this afternoon whether the government is planning to urge those over 40 to pay more taxes to fund social welfare.

The spokesman replied: "No. It is not true that we think about this policy. "

When asked when the government would draw up its social security plan, the spokesman said, "This is one of the most complex problems we face and we need to take the time to make sure that we find a fair and fair solution sustainable. & # 39;

Boris Johnson previously promised to fix the country's social crisis once and for all

Boris Johnson previously promised to fix the country's social crisis once and for all

In its 2019 manifesto, the Tories pledged to "urgently seek bipartisan consensus" on social welfare "to provide the necessary proposal and legislation for long-term reform."

It comes after councils, charities and health organizations have called for a "complete reset" of the social care system.

In a joint intervention, the Local Government Association (LGA), which represents councils in England, along with more than 30 organizations, including the Alzheimer's Association and the NHS Confederation, called for important changes.

They said the government must publish a timetable for a reformed social security system before parliament returns from its summer break in September.

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