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The government is tearing apart the planning bureaucracy to convert businesses into apartments


As of today, the government is reducing the planning bureaucracy so that networked businesses and abandoned offices can be converted into apartments without full building permits, in accordance with the new laws introduced today.

Changes to the planning system make it easier for business owners and developers to reuse rooms that are no longer required and to put them back into operation.

In a further step to support the city centers, families will be offered a new fast-track system with which they can expand their houses by up to two floors.

Shopkeepers could soon benefit from the government's plans to turn businesses into houses with less bureaucracy

The rule change means that complete planning applications are not required to demolish and rebuild unused buildings as houses

The rule change means that complete planning applications are not required to demolish and rebuild unused buildings as houses

The initiatives to be presented to Parliament later today are part of a wider effort to release the planning system and enable more development.

Environment Minister George Eustice announced yesterday a review of the environmental impact assessment system that is held responsible for stopping some developments.

It took less than a month for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to deliver a speech in Dudley, West Yorkshire, to promise "the most radical reforms of our planning system since the end of World War II."

And this summer, ministers are making proposals for broader changes, including a possible new guess in favor of development in certain designated areas.

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said the government "cut unnecessary red tape" in the planning process

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said the government "cut unnecessary red tape" in the planning process

England's city centers, including Eton High Street, have had to accept a slow return to trade as the restrictions on blocking have been relaxed

England's city centers, including Eton High Street, have had to accept a slow return to trade as the restrictions on blocking have been relaxed

The change in rules means that, according to the Ministry of Housing, Municipalities and Local Government, complete planning applications are not required to demolish and rebuild unused buildings as residential buildings, so that commercial and retail properties can be reused quickly.

The latest changes, which will come into effect in September, are designed to help breathe new life into the main roads affected by the closure and open up a new way of providing housing.

Currently, companies need full building change planning permission to transform a business or office into a new type of business or living space.

In his speech at Dudley last month, the Prime Minister promised to push "the most radical reforms of our planning system since the end of World War II."

In his speech at Dudley last month, the Prime Minister promised to push "the most radical reforms of our planning system since the end of World War II."

"Nimbys" must "accept change," says Boris Johnson

Boris Johnson indicated last month that time-consuming environmental studies and similar bureaucracy could be tightened, and said: “Time is money, and the delays in pig counting in our system are seriously affecting the country's productivity and prosperity. & # 39;

He added: "Yes, we will insist on beautiful and low-carbon houses, but Covid taught us the cost of delays. Why are we building houses so slowly compared to other European countries? & # 39;

Mr. Johnson suggested that nimbies, who often slow down development near their homes by objection, should also accept changes. "I can imagine that there will be some people who reject this or that, but there are always some," he said.

"We need pace, and this is the moment to bring that pace to the government's ambitions."

As of September, they will be offered a quick approval process. Developers can also demolish empty buildings for new purposes without full building permission.

According to The Telegraph, today's report will outline lease reduction plans that will allow 4.3 million people to take control of their homes from their landlords.

If tenants offer tenants temporary ownership of a property, government changes can result in people owning the apartment directly and sharing the cost of building management with their neighbors.

Prof. Nick Hopkins, Commissioner for Law and author of the report released today, told The Telegraph: “Commonhold involves a change in culture. It would be a departure from a "we and them" mentality towards "us and us".

"Our reforms will make a real difference by giving tenants better control over their homes, offering a cheaper and easier way out of the lease, and establishing Commonhold as the preferred alternative system."

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said: “We are reforming the planning system and reducing unnecessary bureaucracy to give small business owners the freedom to adapt and develop, and to renew our city centers with new businesses and more living space.

& # 39; These changes will help transform connected, unused buildings into high-quality homes in the heart of their communities.

"This means that families can add up to two floors to their home, which gives children or older relatives much-needed additional space as their household grows."

Pubs, libraries, village shops and other community buildings are exempt from the changes to ensure that a full local debate is required before they can be converted to anything else.

Ministers believe that the changes could help keep city centers alive if the effects of the Corona virus shutdown result in shops and offices being closed.

The cabinet minister said he hoped the change in the rules would relieve the pressure to build on greenfield sites and deliver more houses that match the character of their region while eliminating bureaucracy.

However, the move is likely to be controversial with critics who claim that previous office remodeling has often failed to provide the necessary infrastructure such as schools, transportation, and healthcare.

Homeless charity Shelter has warned that some office refurbishments have left families miles away from local facilities without public transportation.

Proposals that allow people to add two floors to their land could also lead to conflicts between neighbors. Sources said people need to "carefully consider the impact on neighbors and the appearance of enlargement."

First pointing to the changes in late June when he suggested rationalizing time-consuming environmental studies and related bureaucracy, Boris Johnson said, “Time is money, and the delays in pig counting in our system are massive in productivity and prosperity To affect the country. & # 39;

He added: "Yes, we will insist on beautiful and low-carbon houses, but Covid taught us the cost of delays. Why are we building houses so slowly compared to other European countries? & # 39;

Mr Johnson said the government wanted to "build, build, build" just a few days after the announcement of a new unit called the "Project Speed".

Under the leadership of Chancellor Rishi Sunak, the group was asked to quickly track major infrastructure projects and identify bottlenecks in planning systems.

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