ENTERTAINMENT

The focus group shows that voters are desperate for measures to lock down coronaviruses


Last night there was dramatic evidence of a growing revolt against coronavirus lockdowns.

The public believes the rules will not work, they will break the law if necessary, to see loved ones and believe that it is time to "make Britain normal again".

These are some of the key focus group findings that indicate that traditional opinion polls have not found any significant change in attitudes towards the pandemic.

A leading pollster believes the UK could see a replication of what happened in the 2015 elections and the EU referendum.

Opinion polls predicted that Labor's Ed Miliband would be Prime Minister and Brexit opposed: focus groups pointed to the opposite and proved to be correct every time.

Since the pandemic began, most polls have shown voters support lockdowns and, if anything, that the government is placing even stricter restrictions.

Some have argued that this is because taxpayers have allowed workers on leave to stay home for 80 percent of their normal wages.

Many Tory MPs opposed to Boris Johnson's three-tier lockdown system claim their stance is supported by many of their constituents.

The Daily Mail listened to one of the focus groups typical of several recent ones and reiterated the views of MPs.

It was held last Friday and covers a cross-section of society, both Tory and Labor, in London, Birmingham and Liverpool. It seems to show that:

  • Voters have lost confidence in bans.
  • In contrast to the first wave, they are no longer ready to follow all the rules.
  • They think the second wave of the virus will be less dangerous;
  • They are increasingly concerned about the damage to jobs and the economy;
  • Using heavy Covid curbs despite the perceived reduced threat fuels conspiracy theories;
  • Many will turn down a coronavirus vaccine for fear of side effects.
  • There is lingering anger over rule violations such as the Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves 10 Downing Street today to meet with Cabinet Ministers at the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) in London, England

Sheffield revelers are in town for one final night tonight before their town is placed under the strictest level three lockdown

Sheffield revelers are in town for one final night tonight before their town is placed under the strictest lockdown, level three

Police officers arriving in Cardiff city center off Wales in 1745 will enter a two-week "fire break" lockdown at 6pm on Friday to protect the country's NHS from the coronavirus resurgence

Police officers arriving in downtown Cardiff off Wales around 1745 will initiate a two-week lockdown at 6pm on Friday to protect the country's NHS from the coronavirus resurgence

People are drinking in Soho, London tonight. One focus group showed that people lose confidence in bans and are less willing to obey the rules

People are drinking in Soho, London tonight. One focus group showed that people lose confidence in bans and are less willing to obey the rules

JL Partners' James Johnson, who acted as moderator in the focus group, said the results were the same as in similar studies he had conducted.

He said the results convinced him that opinion would turn against bans.

He said that "nuanced conversations" held in focus groups involving only a handful of people have uncovered "hidden truths" about the pandemic and attitudes towards the government's lockdown strategy.

Mr Johnson, who has advised Theresa May on Downing Street, argues that the focus groups are determined to use common sense not to get the virus in place of government dictates.

Voters are "tired" of the curbs and unwilling to continue to be compliant, especially when they see high profile personalities they disregard.

The public, he said, is confused by the rules and is just as likely to see comedian Matt Lucas parodying Boris Johnson's stuttering press conference on Downing Street as the Prime Minister himself.

Mr Johnson says that on certain issues, the intimate atmosphere of his focus groups allows participants to reveal their true feelings.

This is in contrast to opinion polls, which ask around 1,000 voters to answer yes or no to dozen of questions, usually online.

In his most recent focus group, Liverpool pensioner Brian complained: “People with cancer, heart disease and strokes all die.

"We're saving people with coronavirus, but the rest of the population is dying from diseases we can control."

The public knew locks "always collapse," he told the group.

Angela, 59, from Birmingham, said she went months without her older parents earlier in the year and "I'm not doing this again".

Paul, a London property developer, mocked the 10pm curfew, saying the virus was "only spread among the crowds that were being wasted on the streets".

Steph, a charity worker, was just as resilient, despite having the virus herself.

She said Mr Cummings was "disgusting" for breaking Covid rules, adding, "We need to get back to normal."

In public, the government is sticking to its strict stance on bans and insisting that the rules are vital to preventing the virus from spiraling out of control.

In private, however, the government's position is a different story: like the focus groups, it is more nuanced.

The Daily Mail believes ministers are being encouraged by signs that predictions of hundreds of thousands more infections and tens of thousands more deaths in a second wave could be an overestimate.

According to reliable sources, there is evidence that the rate of infection among university students is falling.

And there is evidence that mass masks caused the virus to lose up to 90 percent of its lethal effectiveness.

This, along with more effective drugs, has reduced the death rate in intensive care units in hospitals.

"Let's get back to normal!"

Q: What do you think of the government's coronavirus rules?

Alec, 61, consultant, London, Conservative

They are confusing, unenforceable, and ignored by people.

Brian, 68, retired, Liverpool, Conservative

It kills more people with cancer. Coronavirus is 40th on the list (of causes of death). People with heart problems and strokes all die. We're saving people with coronavirus, but the rest die from diseases we can control.

Amira, (female) 30, school administrator, London, laboratory

They do not match the statistics.

Paul, 48, developer, Birmingham, Conservative

They are patronizing and unjust.

Daniel, 24, student, London, Conservative

Confusing; People in government wouldn't stick to them.

A member of the focus group said government special adviser Dominic Cummings, pictured at right, was "disgusting" for breaking the rules

A member of the focus group said government special adviser Dominic Cummings, pictured at right, was "disgusting" for breaking the rules

Q: Do rules work?

Paul

No. The virus has no time, racial or gender limit. (Authorities) believe it will go away at ten o'clock when the pubs close, but it just spreads out among the crowds that are wasted on the streets.

Brian

You can hold it down for a while, but it will keep breaking out.

Steph, 38, charity worker, Liverpool, Labor

We have (already) tried to lock, we need to get back to normal. How will a second lock be different?

Q: Are you going to follow new rules?

Amira

No, I am very close to my family. I haven't seen her in six months, I'm not going to do it again.

Brian

We all initially followed the rules because we correctly thought we had to get rid of this virus. We went through all the pain of lockdown, now they want us to face another. The consensus is that they (the public) know it won't work, it will always break down.

Howard, 23, engineer, Liverpool

When you need to see your loved ones, see them. If that's why you stop by – don't do it.

Angela, 59, Birmingham, work

I wear a mask when I go out, but I'll see my family anyway because my parents are older. I had a few months not to see her … and I'm not going to do that again. Everything else I will act normally because I could not go through it again mentally.

Daniel

I would break it (lockdown) to see my family – for my sanity.

Paul

Not really. When you need to see your loved ones, see them.

Q: What should MINISTERS do instead?

Angela

Go ahead and be sensible, don't mingle with large crowds. Get back to normal as much as possible.

Daniel

There should be a suspension with very harsh sentences … for a short time. Then we could remove the virus and live as we want.

Q: Why did trust in the rules break down?

Paul

If the queen doesn't wear a mask, why should I bother?

Steph

Dominic Cummings & # 39; (behavior) was disgusting, Matt Hancock put his arm around other MPs in the lower house.

Paul

You have Cummings on a jolly, the woman (MP) who went from Scotland to London and back with the virus and is not being prosecuted. It's a cop. And they want to punish us!

Brian

According to the mail, the average age of a dying Covid person is 82 years and the average life expectancy is 81 years. So who are we protecting? There is a good chance that I would survive at age 68.

Q: Do you have a Covid vaccine?

Angela

I don't believe in vaccines, wouldn't have any.

Paul

What if they put out one that hasn't been tested, and in five years we'll all have side effects? We're all going to sue the government for being forced to have it.

Alec

I'm going to take it because it's going to be a worldwide vaccine.

Groups called it directly at Brexit

Commentary by James Johnson

Take a look at the polls that continue to show high levels of support for tighter restrictions and you will be forgiven for being a nation of lockdown lovers.

But the polls hide a hidden truth – because focus groups, moderated discussions with voter groups, show that the mood is very different than in March and April.

Instead of happily jumping into another lock, people are frustrated, tired, and more aware than ever of the economic impact of further restrictions.

In discussions I've had across the country, voters are increasingly talking about how to use common sense to deal with restrictions. They speak openly about how they will visit older relatives and shape their lives in ways they would not have done when they were first locked.

The public remains concerned about the virus and wants to put health first. But the image of a nation happily jumping into Lockdown 2.0 is misleading. The mood is very different than in spring. Pictured: Patrons drinking at a Wetherspoons pub in Leigh, Greater Manchester yesterday

The public remains concerned about the virus and wants to put health first. But the image of a nation happily jumping into Lockdown 2.0 is misleading. The mood is very different than in spring. Pictured: Patrons drinking at a Wetherspoons pub in Leigh, Greater Manchester yesterday

This is not mass disobedience – the public remains concerned about the virus and is more likely to accept new restrictions with resignation than with revolution. But they are increasingly taking matters into their own hands.

In the past, nuanced conversations with voters have revealed such hidden truths. Participate in the 2015 election when Labor and Conservatives were on par in the polls but fears continued to arise in focus groups about the role Nicola Sturgeon might play in a government led by Ed Miliband.

Similarly, most opinion polls before the 2016 EU referendum pointed to a win for Remain. Focus groups showed a much deeper alarm about uncontrolled EU immigration and support for Brexit. In both cases, focus groups were more reliable.

What caused this change in public sentiment regarding coronavirus restrictions? First, people talk about how tired they are from the measures and say that even though they see why they are needed, they are not sure they can face the same for another six months.

Participate in the 2015 election when Labor and Conservatives were on par in the polls but focus groups continued to raise concerns about the role Nicola Sturgeon might play in a government led by Ed Miliband

Participate in the 2015 election when Labor and Conservatives were on par in the polls but fears continued to arise in focus groups about the role Nicola Sturgeon might play in a government led by Ed Miliband

The effects on mental health and routine NHS care are more common.

There is also growing frustration that those responsible do not obey the rules but expect us to do so. Dominic Cummings & # 39; trip to Barnard Castle keeps coming up.

Finally, there is widespread confusion about the rules.

The tiered system generated more questions than answers. Terms like "rule of six" and "support bubble" are used synonymously.

The public remains concerned about the virus and wants to put health first. But the image of a nation happily jumping into Lockdown 2.0 is misleading. The mood is very different than in spring.

JL Partners' James Johnson was a Downing Street election advisor to Theresa May

Trolley police crackdown: Now LIDL covers its famous aisle while Tesco workers in Wales cover kettles and linens on shelves after "power-mad" Prime Minister Mark Drakeford started selling "non-essential" items and patrolling the border has forbidden

Supermarket workers in Wales hushed kettles and phone chargers from shelves today as "power-mad" First Minister Mark Drakeford banned the sale of "non-essential" items during the country's coronavirus fire lockdown.

Tesco and Lidl staff became Wales' first "trolley police" as they hid shelves of "nonessential" items behind plastic wrap to deter customers from buying them before restrictions began tonight were introduced.

Plastic barriers and stacks of beverage crates were also erected to cordon off certain aisles, while other items were taped off by staff to comply with the draconian new rules.

In other major supermarkets, Sainsbury's staff worked around the clock to make changes while Waitrose reviewed government guidelines and Asda claimed it had "very little time" to implement the new rules.

Four employees at a Tesco store in Pontypool inspected the cover-up for a 20-minute test run before the latest restrictions went into effect. Witnesses admitted they had never seen anything like it.

Mr Drakeford described preventing supermarkets from selling non-essential products during the fire lock as "a simple matter of fairness".

The Welsh Labor leader couldn't hide his frustration today as he was repeatedly asked about the restrictions, which have now been in place for 17 days. He said they were "fair" and crucial in stopping the virus from spreading.

He told a press conference in Cardiff that any suggestion that the ban announced Thursday was based on his own policy was "nonsensical".

He said: “We are asking hundreds of small businesses to close on the main road across Wales.

“We can't do that and then allow supermarkets to sell goods that these people can't sell.

“And we try to minimize the time people spend outside their homes in that two-week period.

"This is not the time to go shopping for non-essential items in supermarkets."

He said trying to find exemptions from the rules was "just the wrong" approach and urged the people of Wales not to use the ceasefire to do things they don't have to.

"It's a simple matter of fairness – we're here in Wales together," he added.

It has been confirmed that police checks will be in place on an important stretch of the border with England. Gloucestershire Constabulary can tell drivers wishing to drive to Wales to turn around if officials are not satisfied with their explanation.

If they refuse, police said they will notify the armed forces in Wales so they can issue a fine.

Mr Drakeford has long had a conflict with Boris Johnson when he tried to impose travel restrictions in England on those living in cities with high numbers of cases.

Officials were also out and about in Cardiff city center that evening when the new rules went into effect at 6 p.m. and dozen of stores closed for the next fortnight.

Elsewhere, Nicola Sturgeon confirmed today that Scotland will enter a new five tier system of Covid-19 restrictions.

The new model will take effect on November 2nd, when current hospitality restrictions expire. It comprises five levels of measures from level zero to level four that are applied in different parts of Scotland.

Supermarket workers in Wales covered kettles and phone chargers on shelves today when First Secretary Mark Drakeford banned the sale of "nonessential" items during the country's coronavirus fire lockdown

Supermarket workers in Wales covered kettles and phone chargers on shelves today when First Secretary Mark Drakeford banned the sale of "nonessential" items during the country's coronavirus fire lockdown

Lidl closed all "non-essential" aisles in Porthmadog, long before today's 6:00 p.m. deadline, with the ban that should apply for the duration of the 17-day "fire break" ban

Lidl closed all "non-essential" aisles in Porthmadog, long before today's 6:00 p.m. deadline, with the ban that should apply for the duration of the 17-day "fire break" ban

Police officers were in Cardiff city center tonight when Wales went into a 17-day "fire safety" lockdown at 6pm

Police officers were in Cardiff city center tonight when Wales entered a 17-day "fire safety" lockdown at 6pm

First Minister Mark Drakeford (pictured today) said it would be "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials

First Minister Mark Drakeford (pictured today) said it would be "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials

Supermarket customers in Wales today said sales of duvets, bedding and electrical appliances had been stopped by Tesco employees who had covered the shelves with plastic.

31-year-old Tesco customer Jamie Cole said the aisle with kettles and phone chargers is also "completely closed" despite being "needed" as temperatures gradually drop across the country.

Mr. Cole said, “I was shocked, it's pretty bad. Bedding should be available for children and mothers. We're coming into winter, it's cold outside, I couldn't believe it.

“I don't have children of my own, but my girlfriend and sister have children, she's also pretty shocked. You rely on Tesco as it is the only supermarket in our town.

“That was at 10:49 am today, the restrictions won't take effect until 6:00 pm and all other supermarkets are fine. The employees only follow orders, it happened so quickly. They only announced it around 7pm last night.

“I'm 30 years old and I've never seen anything like it in my life. You follow the rules then do this, it's pretty intimidating. There was another corridor that was also completely closed, namely the stationery corridor and the electrical system.

“If you needed a kettle or a phone charger, this aisle was completely closed. I've done some homework and there isn't a key items list on the Wales government website.

"I think it's the supermarket that decides which items are important."

A spokesperson for Tesco confirmed to MailOnline: "Our colleagues across Wales will be working incredibly hard today to ensure that we can comply with the Welsh Government's ban on selling" nonessential "goods to our customers from 6pm this evening."

It came after Mr. Drakeford snapped today when he was toasted over his ban on the shops selling the items in his lock.

The Labor First Minister couldn't hide his frustration when asked repeatedly about the restrictions, which went into effect at 6 p.m. for 17 days.

He insisted that they were "fair" and crucial in stopping the virus from spreading.

However, when asked if it was “imperative” for parents to buy new school pants if their children tear them up, Drakeford groaned, “It's just the wrong way to approach this whole business.

"We're back to the approach of how to bypass the rules for coronavirus."

Plastic sheeting has been placed over electrical appliances that are banned from being sold in this Welsh Asda store tonight

Plastic sheeting has been placed over electrical appliances that are banned from being sold in this Welsh Asda store tonight

Pallets of inventory block access to non-essential goods in the Sainsburys store in Crindau, Newport, at the start of the fire lockdown

Pallets of inventory block access to non-essential goods in the Sainsburys store in Crindau, Newport, at the start of the fire lockdown

Non-essential aisles in Asda, near Coryton, Cardiff, were closed at 6 p.m. to meet fire break ban rules

Non-essential corridors at Asda in Coryton, Cardiff, were closed at 6 p.m. to meet fire break ban rules

Children's clothing was wrapped in cellophane as it cannot be sold under the new regulations on blocking fire protection agents

Children's clothing was wrapped in cellophane as it cannot be sold under the new regulations on the blocking of fire retardants

Barriers have been put in place at this Asda store in the Welsh capital to prevent customers from accessing nonessential items that are prohibited from selling

Barriers have been put in place at this Asda store in the Welsh capital to prevent customers from accessing nonessential items that are prohibited from selling

The supermarket employees used various obstacles to block access to their aisles with non-essential products

The supermarket employees used various obstacles to block access to their aisles with non-essential products

Crates of beverages have been used to cordon off non-essential aisles in the Tesco store in Cardiff to comply with the new rules

Crates of beverages have been used to cordon off non-essential aisles in the Tesco store in Cardiff to comply with the new rules

Employees stacked boxes of alcohol to hide nonessential items that cannot be sold under the new lockdown

Employees stacked boxes of alcohol to hide nonessential items that cannot be sold under the new lockdown

Non-essential aisles were cordoned off with a plastic barrier today in this Tesco Extra store on Western Avenue, Cardiff

Non-essential aisles were cordoned off with a plastic barrier today in this Tesco Extra store on Western Avenue, Cardiff

Toys and other entertainment products were cordoned off at the super store in the Welsh capital today

Toys and other entertainment products were cordoned off at the super store in the Welsh capital today

The employees pasted products such as duvets in Tesco's shop in Pontypool with a sign that read: "Unfortunately, due to government guidelines, we can only sell these items on November 9th."

The employees pasted products such as duvets in Tesco's shop in Pontypool with a sign that read: "Unfortunately, due to government guidelines, we can only sell these items on November 9th."

A barrier was erected at a Tesco supermarket in Swansea today as supermarkets are instructed to stop selling non-essential items

A barrier was erected at a Tesco supermarket in Swansea today as supermarkets are instructed to stop selling non-essential items

The clothes aisle at Tesco supermarket in Pontypool was closed after the Welsh government banned the sale of non-essential items

The clothes aisle at Tesco supermarket in Pontypool was closed after the Welsh government banned the sale of non-essential items

First Minister Mark Drakeford said at a press conference today that supermarkets cannot sell goods that small shops cannot sell. In the picture: A Lidl aisle in Porthmadog that was closed by employees

First Minister Mark Drakeford said at a press conference today that supermarkets cannot sell goods that small shops cannot sell. In the picture: A Lidl aisle in Porthmadog that was closed by employees

A barrier was erected at a Tesco supermarket in Swansea today as supermarkets are instructed to stop selling non-essential items

A barrier was erected at a Tesco supermarket in Swansea today as supermarkets are instructed to stop selling non-essential items

A sign in a Lidl store in Porthmadog tells customers this afternoon: "We are not allowed to sell non-essential items."

A sign in a Lidl store in Porthmadog tells customers this afternoon: "We are not allowed to sell non-essential items."

He added irritably, "There is a greater price at stake here than whether or not you have to buy a candle."

Mr Drakeford insisted that it was unacceptable to allow supermarkets to continue selling clothing and other products while smaller retailers were closed.

"We're all here in Wales," he said at a press conference in Cardiff.

"This is no time to go shopping for non-essential items in supermarkets."

Anger rose today, however, as Welsh Health Minister Vaughan Gething made it clear that alcohol is a key element under the confusing new rules – but insisted that hair dryers don't.

He also acknowledged that a "line by line" list of products sold was "unusable" and hoped retailers would have an "adult understanding".

There are fears that this will mark a return to the scenes seen at the start of the pandemic, when there was controversy over the contents of people's shopping carts.

Mr Drakeford said this afternoon that local restrictions have managed to contain the spread of the virus but not "turn it back".

He compared advances like Torfaen positively to areas in England like Oldham.

But he said the "brief sharp shock" of a lockdown was now essential.

"We need to act now because the virus is rising too quickly," he said.

Many retailers will be forced to close completely during the "fire safety" lockdown, but grocery stores and pharmacies can remain open.

During a bruised interview with Kay Burley on Sky News, Mr Gething said the Welsh government was producing "categories" for sale.

"A supermarket that sells clothes is not essential. We want adults to understand what they can do so that they can do that."

He added, “We don't want to go line by line through thousands of product items. That would be useless from their and our point of view, ”he said.

Burley asked if the situation meant alcohol was essential but a hair dryer was not.

"Well, food and drink are things we had in the first phase of the pandemic. They are available everywhere," Gething replied.

When the moderator insisted, "Trust me, my hair dryer is important", Mr. Gething replied, "No, it isn't, Kay."

Burley said: 'Of course it is. Look at the condition of your hair compared to mine. I need to dry my hair, you can towel dry yours. & # 39;

But Mr Gething replied, "I don't think the biggest problem on people's minds in Wales is going to be whether they can buy a hair dryer for the next two weeks."

The UK has 20,530 more coronavirus cases and 224 deaths, but SAGE believes the R-rate has decreased slightly and ONS estimates that 35,200 people were infected every day in England last week, which is a "hopeful" sign of that that the outbreak is slowing down

The UK today announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 people. However, official data suggests that the country's outbreak may be slowing.

Positive tests were up 31 percent last Friday from 15,650, and deaths were up 65 percent in a week.

However, government scientists today claimed the crucial R-rate had dropped slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to be, although the epidemic is still on the rise.

SAGE estimates that the UK's reproductive rate fell for the first time in a month from 1.3-1.5 to 1.2-1.4. The number – the key measure in number 10's plan to fight the virus – must stay below one or the outbreak will continue to increase.

And the Bureau of National Statistics, which is tracking the size of the Covid-19 outbreak through thousands of random swab tests, found today that the number of people getting the coronavirus every day in England alone was 35,200 last week.

Despite an increase of 26 percent from the previous estimate and a doubling from two weeks ago, top scientists insisted the number was "hopeful" as the rate of growth had slowed significantly. Cases doubled between October 2 and 9, and rose two-thirds (62 percent) to 27,900 per day the following week. This is evident from the ONS data, which is considered to be the most reliable indicator of the true extent of the crisis.

In other promising developments, MailOnline announced today that nearly half of local authorities in England saw a drop in the rate of coronavirus infection last week. Newcastle and Nottingham, both battling some of the largest Covid-19 outbreaks in England, saw some of the biggest declines.

The data echoes comments from UK Principal Science Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance, who said yesterday that there are now signs that local lockdowns are starting to work and that case numbers are gradually flattening out in some areas.

Despite the optimism, SAGE advisors warned that they were "almost certain that the epidemic continues to grow exponentially across the country".

The dates come as draconian lockdown rules continue to emerge across the UK. Warrington in Cheshire was the last to confirm that Tier 3 measures would be imposed while hard-hit parts of Nottinghamshire are also at risk of narrower curbs to strangle the virus.

In Wales, which is now under a tougher "fire safety" lockdown, leader Mark Drakeford has been accused of going "power mad" after banning the sale of "nonessential" items in supermarkets, with Tesco and Lidl workers Wales first became "trolley police" when they were seen covering up electrical items.

Researchers at King's College London's Covid Symptom Study, who predict there are 36,000 new cases of symptomatic Covid-19 per day in the UK, have predicted Hartlepool, Sunderland, Stockton-on-Tees to be the next spots Tier 3 restrictions apply to Gateshead, Darlington and County Durham in the northeast; Bradford to the northwest; and Nottingham and Bassetlaw in the Midlands.

Scientists have repeatedly called for a national lockout on circuit breakers to stop the spiraling eruption and turn the clock back so the testing and tracking system can catch up and prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed. The wards in the northwest are filling fast and some have more patients now than they did in April.

The UK today announced 20,530 more coronavirus cases and the deaths of 224 people. However, official data suggests that the country's outbreak may be slowing.

Positive tests were up 31 percent last Friday from 15,650 and deaths were up 65 percent in a week.

However, government scientists today claimed the all-important R-rate had dropped slightly, and a number of statistics found that cases are no longer growing as fast as they used to be, although the epidemic is still on the rise.

SAGE estimates the UK's reproductive rate fell for the first time in a month from 1.3-1.5 to 1.2-1.4. The number – the key measure in number 10's plan to fight the virus – must stay below one or the outbreak will continue to increase.

And the Bureau of National Statistics, which is tracking the size of the Covid-19 outbreak through thousands of random swab tests, found today that the number of people getting the coronavirus every day in England alone was 35,200 last week.

Despite an increase of 26 percent from the previous estimate and a doubling from two weeks ago, top scientists insisted the number was "hopeful" as the rate of growth had slowed significantly. Cases doubled between October 2 and 9, and rose two-thirds (62 percent) to 27,900 per day the following week. This is evident from the ONS data, which is considered to be the most reliable indicator of the true extent of the crisis.

In other promising developments, MailOnline announced today that nearly half of local authorities in England saw a drop in the rate of coronavirus infection last week. Newcastle and Nottingham, both battling some of the largest Covid-19 outbreaks in England, saw some of the biggest declines.

The data echoes comments from UK Principal Science Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance, who said yesterday that there are now signs that local lockdowns are starting to work and that case numbers are gradually flattening out in some areas.

Trotz des Optimismus warnten die SAGE-Berater, dass sie "fast sicher seien, dass die Epidemie im ganzen Land weiterhin exponentiell zunimmt".

Die Daten kommen, da in ganz Großbritannien immer mehr drakonische Sperrregeln auftauchen. Warrington in Cheshire hat heute als letztes bestätigt, dass Tier-3-Maßnahmen verhängt werden, während schwer betroffene Teile von Nottinghamshire auch der Gefahr engerer Bordsteine ​​ausgesetzt sind, um das Virus zu erwürgen.

In Wales, das heute in eine härtere "Brandschutz" -Sperre gerät, wurde der Anführer Mark Drakeford beschuldigt, "machtverrückt" zu werden, nachdem er den Verkauf von "nicht wesentlichen" Artikeln in Supermärkten verboten hatte, wobei Tesco- und Lidl-Arbeiter zu Wales wurden erste "Trolley-Polizei", als sie gesehen wurden, wie sie elektrische Gegenstände vertuschten.

Forscher der Covid Symptom Study des King's College London, die vorhersagen, dass es in Großbritannien 36.000 neue Fälle von symptomatischem Covid-19 pro Tag gibt, haben vorausgesagt, dass Hartlepool, Sunderland, Stockton-on-Tees die nächsten Orte sein werden, an denen Tier-3-Beschränkungen gelten , Gateshead, Darlington und County Durham im Nordosten; Bradford im Nordwesten; und Nottingham und Bassetlaw in den Midlands.

Wissenschaftler haben wiederholt eine nationale Sperrung für Leistungsschalter gefordert, um den spiralförmigen Ausbruch zu stoppen und die Uhr zurückzudrehen, damit das Test- und Rückverfolgungssystem aufholen und verhindern kann, dass Krankenhäuser überfordert werden. Die Stationen im Nordwesten füllen sich schnell und einige haben jetzt mehr Patienten als im April.

Sir Patrick Vallance, der SAGE leitet, sagte gestern, er sei "sicher", dass die Schätzungen für neue Fälle von Coronavirus heute steigen würden, und gab an, dass sie dies wahrscheinlich nächste Woche erneut tun würden. Aber er gab zu, dass es Anzeichen dafür gibt, dass sich der Anstieg verlangsamt.

Die Tatsache, dass die R-Rate über eins bleibt, bedeutet, dass "die Epidemie immer noch wächst", sagte er.

“As long as R is above one, the epidemic will continue to grow, and it will continue to grow at a reasonable rate – it may double every 14 to 18 days – unless the R drops below one.

“But I want to say that there are some areas where we are starting to see real effects of what is happening. There is some evidence that rates among young people are falling or flattening a bit because of the tremendous effort people have made to hold onto these behavioral changes that we need to bring them down.

“And there may be a slight flattening in some areas of the country. So the measures are working, but we need to do more if the goal is to get R below one and reduce this epidemic. & # 39;

In a televised briefing with Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Sir Patrick showed dias showing an estimated 22,000 to 90,000 new infections in England every day.

The startling upper estimate comes from a statement by the SAGE subgroup SPI-M, which Sir Patrick regularly models with viruses, and whose members are known for advocating national circuit breaker lockdowns.

Die King's College Covid Symptom Study, die positive Testergebnisse verwendet und Symptome aus ihrer App Covid Symptom Study berichtet, schätzt heute, dass es in England jeden Tag 28.213 neue Fälle von symptomatischem Coronavirus gibt.

Diese bilden den größten Teil der geschätzten 36.251 für das gesamte Vereinigte Königreich, weitere 4.095 pro Tag in Schottland, 2.366 in Wales und 1.577 in Nordirland.

Die nördlichen Regionen Englands und der Midlands sind für die meisten dieser Fälle verantwortlich, erklärte der Bericht mit 7.831 pro Tag im Nordwesten, 7.058 pro Tag im Nordosten und 6.788 pro Tag in den Midlands. Die wenigsten befanden sich mit 1.700 pro Tag im Osten Englands.

Professor Tim Spector, der Epidemiologe, der die Studie durchführt, sagte: „Während wir diese zweite Welle von Covid-19 durchlaufen, sehen wir immer noch Fälle in ganz Großbritannien mit einem R-Wert von 1,2 und der Kluft zwischen den nördlichen Regionen von Großbritannien und der Süden wachsen.

"Unsere Daten zeigen deutlich, dass die Zahl der Fälle immer noch von den jüngeren Generationen bestimmt wird, was im Vergleich zu Anfang des Jahres weniger Druck auf die NHS-Aufnahme bedeuten dürfte."

Die heutigen Datenveröffentlichungen werden veröffentlicht, da die lokalen Sperrregeln im ganzen Land verschärft werden. Warrington in Merseyside ist das neueste Gebiet, das bestätigt, dass es in den kommenden Tagen in die dritte Stufe übergehen wird.

Die Gemeindevorsteher haben sich auf ein 5-Millionen-Pfund-Unterstützungspaket für Unternehmen geeinigt, das zum Zeitpunkt des Inkrafttretens der neuen Maßnahmen voraussichtlich nächste Woche geschlossen werden muss.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) EU-Referendum