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The expert shows how to master the ability to pour wine like a professional


Investing in a chic bottle of wine to impress your loved ones and loved ones is all well and good, but the best thing is how you display it.

According to a top sommelier, the way you pour your wine can enrich the taste of the wine and add a touch of class to the overall experience.

Additionally, the style of the glass in which you serve your white or red can also affect your appreciation, as certain varieties are better suited to certain shapes.

The festive season is the perfect time to master the skill of pouring wine – and drinking it (in moderation) could help you get through!

Here Lukasz Kolodziejczyk, Head of Fine Wine at Cult Wines, gives his best tips for serving your best bottle of vino.

According to a top sommelier, the way you pour your wine can enrich the taste of the wine and add a touch of class to the overall experience. Image from a picture agency

Start decanting

Decanting should ideally be done before you even think about pouring a glass.

Decanting has two functions. First, to prevent naturally occurring sediments from getting into your glass, and second, to help the wine ventilate and open up before it is drunk.

Of course, the process also serves an aesthetic purpose, as an elegant crystal carafe makes an excellent table centerpiece.

There are many different shapes and styles of decanters, but sometimes we need to remember the main reason you would be decanting a bottle of wine.

Wine has to breathe, some more than others, but ideally we want to give as much space as possible for the carafe to do its job.

Wider decanters work well for red wines and full bodied oak whites, while a narrower one is best for white wines that don't need as much space to evoke the characteristics

Wider decanters work well for red wines and full bodied oak whites, while a narrower one is best for white wines that don't need as much space to evoke the characteristics

Wider decanters like the Riedel Decanter Ultra (left) are well suited for red wines and full-bodied white wines, while a narrower one like the Zalto Carafe 75 ml (right) goes best with white wines that do not require as much space to evoke the characteristics

The wider the base of the carafe, the better – especially for red wines and full-bodied oak whites. The increased surface area you give improves ventilation and brings out the best in your wine. Its aromas and flavors evolve as it is decanted.

Younger, more tannic wines usually take longer to open – some may benefit from decanting several hours before drinking. Older, more mature wines usually take less time to reach their full potential.

A narrower carafe is better suited for white wines that do not need as much space to awaken the properties when they are removed from the bottle.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT GLASS

It's your home and your rules, so you can really serve your wine however you want. Wine experts, however, largely agree that the right style of wine glass in combination with the right wine makes all the difference to your tasting experience.

There are dozen of glass styles to choose from, and for the seasoned wine drinker, this can result in a need for lots of cabinet space.

Fortunately, there are many attractive “universal” glass options on the market, as well as those designed for specific grades.

Bordeaux / Merlot / Cabernet

Red wines such as Merlot, Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon benefit from a tall wine glass with a large bowl that tapers slightly towards the opening

Red wines such as Merlot, Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon benefit from a tall wine glass with a large bowl that tapers slightly towards the opening

The glasses for these wines are usually the tallest you will find, with a large bowl that tapers slightly towards the opening.

This allows you to really get your nose into the glass to get a good sniff of the air and allow the ethanol to evaporate easily, which helps the wine taste smoother and bring out fruit flavors.

Syrah / Shiraz / Malbec / Sangiovese

Red wines like Syrah, Shiraz, Malbec, and Sangiovese are best served in a smaller glass with a smaller opening to soften the wine

Red wines like Syrah, Shiraz, Malbec, and Sangiovese are best served in a smaller glass with a smaller opening to soften the wine

These wines often have more tannic, spicier aromas, so the corresponding glass has a slightly smaller bowl with a smaller opening.

This will help soften the wine as it enters your palette more slowly. A higher level of rejuvenation will help capture the aromas so that you can fully enjoy the aromas of the wine.

Burgundy / Pinot Noir

A juicy Burgundy or Pinot Noir red wine works best in a glass with a wide bowl so that more oxygen comes into contact with the wine

A juicy Burgundy or Pinot Noir red wine works best in a glass with a wide bowl so that more oxygen comes into contact with the wine

Glasses for these wines are usually the widest and shortest styles.

A wide bowl allows a greater amount of oxygen to come into contact with the wine, while the smaller opening and high degree of tapering help to collect the wine's bold aromas and direct its intense aromas to the right part of your tongue.

Sauvignon Blanc / Riesling

Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling can be served in the same type and shape of glass - typically with a medium to long stem and a narrow bowl with a slight taper

Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling can be served in the same type and shape of glass – usually with a medium to long stem and a narrow bowl with a slight taper

White wine glasses are typically smaller in height and bowl size than red wine glasses. Since its aromas are much lighter, the wine can move closer to your nose.

Despite their different properties, Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling can be served in the same type and shape of glass – typically with a medium to long stem and a narrow bowl with a slight taper.

For Sauvignon Blanc, this helps to minimize the oxygen content in the glass and makes it easier to recognize the aromas of the wine.

For the Riesling, this helps concentrate the flavors in the top half of the bowl.

Chardonnay

Glasses with a large bowl that allow a large surface area are ideal for full-bodied white wines like Chardonnay

Glasses with a large bowl that allow a large surface area are ideal for full-bodied white wines like Chardonnay

Glasses designed for Chardonnay are almost the exact opposite of those designed for Sauvignon Blanc.

These glasses have a large bowl, similar to a burgundy or pinot noir glass, although they are even smaller overall.

The large bowl offers a large surface area, ideal for full-bodied oak-aged white wines.

LEARN THE LABEL

In general, it doesn't matter who is served first or how, but if you want to get things done "after the book", etiquette dictates that women are served first and glasses should always be filled by the guest's right .

Winemakers are also very proud of their creations, and the label on a bottle is an expression of that pride.

Avoid peeling the entire foil capsule off the top of the bottle. Instead, cut them neatly just below the edge of the bottle so that the wine doesn't get over the foil onto the label.

Pour the correct amount

Now is the time to pour the wine! Open the bottle cleanly and quietly (if not decanted) and hold the glass on the table, hold the bottle towards the floor (never by the neck) and carefully pour the wine into the glass.

The exact location in the glass does not matter as long as you do not inject.

Champagne poured with a tilted glass like beer will hold back more gas, which means less bubbles will foam up on top of the glass. Image from a picture agency

Champagne poured with a tilted glass like beer will hold back more gas – which means fewer bubbles will foam up on top of the glass. Image from a picture agency

Be especially careful if it is a sparkling wine – pour a small amount into the flute, allow the bubbles to settle, and then finish pouring until the glass is three-quarters full.

FIZZ – to tip or not to tip?

Champagne poured with a tilted glass like beer will hold back more gas – which means fewer bubbles will foam up on top of the glass.

There is some controversy surrounding this mindset as some Fizz fans claim champagne would actually be better served in a saucer or even a white wine glass – it's a matter of preference.

For red and white wines, the usual measure is around 125 ml for a smaller portion or 175 ml for an average large portion.

This is quite difficult from a point of view, so it's usually best to fill the widest part of the glass or at least a couple of inches from the edge.

This gives the wine the best opportunity to breathe.

Avoid the dreamed dribbling

Nobody likes a sloppy pourer, and even if you follow the advice above, your efforts can easily end up being undone by improperly dribbling.

When you're done pouring, just before pulling the bottle out, quickly turn the bottle over with your wrist, then tilt it upright.

You can also keep a white cloth nearby to wipe the neck of the bottle afterwards, just in case.

Further information can be found at https://www.wineinvestment.com/

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