ENTERTAINMENT

The EU plans to ban British sausages from Europe if a post-Brexit trade deal is not signed by January 1st


Afraid of the sausage! EU plans to ban British sausages from Europe – including Northern Ireland – if a post-Brexit trade deal is not concluded by January 1st

  • Bratwurst, burgers and minced meat are some of the products that could be banned
  • Talks are currently underway to reach a post-Brexit trade deal that should be 95% complete
  • Before the Brexit transition period ends on January 1st, a few important questions must be clarified
  • Britain has threatened an embargo of retaliation if the ban on unfrozen meat comes into play

The UK and the EU are arguing over sausages, burgers and other meat products as a potential trade ban threatens before the end of the Brexit transition period.

Talks are being held at the last minute to avoid a two-way embargo on undercooked prepared meat products, which according to EU regulations can only be frozen to minus 18 ° C.

If an agreement is not reached, Irish sausages and German bratwurst could disappear from the shelves of UK supermarkets early next year.

Under current regulations, such products, as well as other products, including ground beef, will no longer be allowed to enter Northern Ireland from the UK on January 1st.

The UK and the EU are fighting over sausages, burgers and other meat products as a potential trade ban threatens before the end of the Brexit transition period on January 1 [photo in stock].

However, the UK has warned that if a solution is not found, it could introduce a mutual ban on Irish exports to mainland Britain, The Times reported.

The UK will be treated as a non-EU country under the terms of the Take Back Agreement after the end of this year, but Northern Ireland will maintain EU food safety rules to prevent a hard border with the Republic of Ireland.

Tens of millions of pounds of meat will be threatened and supply chains will be disrupted if no agreement can be reached to allow fresh or chilled meat products to move from the UK to Northern Ireland.

Talks are being held to resolve what Irish Agriculture Minister Charlie McConalogue has described as "worrying".

"Then there will be considerable work to be done in the coming weeks to ensure that trading on January 1st is as smooth and efficient as possible," he said.

Talks are being held at the last minute to avoid a two-way embargo on undercooked prepared meat products such as sausages, minced meat and burgers, which, according to EU regulations, can only be introduced into the block if it is frozen to minus 18 ° C [Photo in stock].

Talks are being held at the last minute to avoid a two-way embargo on undercooked prepared meat products such as sausages, minced meat and burgers, which, according to EU regulations, can only be introduced into the block if it is frozen to minus 18 ° C [Photo in stock].

Little progress has reportedly been made in persuading the EU to issue an export health certificate to undercooked processed meat, although the issue was raised at the beginning of the negotiations.

Retaliatory measures from the UK could economically harm Ireland, which exported 335,000 tonnes of beef, pork, sheep and poultry worth EUR 1.3 billion to the UK in 2018, The Times reported.

"It was pointed out that the government has made a commitment to reflect EU food safety legislation after leaving the block," the Times told a Whitehall source.

"That is, if they forbid it, we will ban it too."

Tens of millions of pounds of meat will be threatened and supply chains will be disrupted if an agreement cannot be reached to allow fresh or chilled meat products to travel from the UK to Northern Ireland [stock photo].

Tens of millions of pounds of meat will be threatened and supply chains will be disrupted if an agreement cannot be reached to allow fresh or chilled meat products to travel from the UK to Northern Ireland [stock photo].

The European Commission has refused to comment on the struggle while a UK government spokesman said talks were still ongoing and they hoped a solution could be found in the coming weeks, the Times reported.

Negotiations went online last week after a member of Michel Barnier's team tested positive for coronavirus.

The EU chief negotiator will meet in person in London this week if he tests negative.

EU sources have claimed the deal is 95% complete except for a few major roadblocks, The Telegraph reported.

This includes issues of fisheries, equal trade policy and enforcement of the final agreement.

EU negotiator Michel Barnier will hold face-to-face meetings in London this week if he takes a negative coronavirus test after a member of his team tests positive [file photo]

EU negotiator Michel Barnier will hold face-to-face meetings in London this week if he takes a negative coronavirus test after a member of his team tests positive [file photo]

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