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The Eat Out to Help Out program is set to break the 80 million meal barrier tonight and cost the taxpayer £ 400 million


The Eat Out to Help Out program is set to break the 80 million meal barrier tonight and cost the taxpayer £ 400 million on the final night of Chancellor Rishi Sunak's program.

Guests have queued for three hours to receive their final 50% discounts of up to £ 10 per capita that have been on offer in restaurants across the country since early August.

The Treasury Department estimates the average claim is close to £ 5, and after consuming 64 million meals in the first three weeks of the increasingly popular program, the 80 million expected to go to "Rishi & # 39; s Dish & # 39; 39; s “took part cost the taxpayer around £ 400 million.

Customers at Josie's Winchester Café were told it would take three hours to get a table if they joined a virtual queuing system via a mobile app, while those who went to Nando's in Hammersmith, London said two Having to wait hours.

One of the lucky few who got a seat was 25 year old accountant Brandon Reis, who told MailOnline, "The opportunity to make savings like this may never come back. That's why I ate out two to three times a week . "

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LONDON: Diners in central London's city of China are making the most of the latest Eat Out to Help Out on Monday night – the government's plan to boost business amid the pandemic that has cost taxpayers an estimated £ 400 million

WINDSOR: Diners in bustling Windsor, Berkshire, on Monday afternoon as thousands tried to make the most of the Chancellor's lavish dining program

WINDSOR: Diners in bustling Windsor, Berkshire, on Monday afternoon as thousands tried to make the most of the Chancellor's lavish dining program

BRIGHTON: A large line is forming outside of Wagamamas in the city center. In the chain, Rishi Sunak started the deal

BRIGHTON: A large line is forming outside of Wagamamas in the city center. In the chain, Rishi Sunak started the deal

LEEDS: It's not surprising that McDonald & # 39; s took advantage of the offer. Today the guests are waiting outside this branch for table service

LEEDS: It's not surprising that McDonald & # 39; s took advantage of the offer. Today the guests are waiting outside this branch for table service

SOUTHAMPTON: Shangai Bay, a Chinese restaurant, was doing a lavish trade today thanks to a torrent of bargain hunters

SOUTHAMPTON: Shangai Bay, a Chinese restaurant, was doing a lavish trade today thanks to a torrent of bargain hunters

Twitter user Edmund O & # 39; Leary enjoyed an All English Breakfast at Hay Wain in Epson, which he thanked for his "great service".

Twitter user Edmund O & # 39; Leary enjoyed an All English Breakfast at Hay Wain in Epson, which he thanked for his "great service".

Alex Sparkes with friends Max Tracey and Adam Telling enjoys £ 4 burgers reduced from £ 8 at Pyrford Golf Club in Woking. Mr Sparkes said, "We're usually more into our fish dinner - especially on a big away sports day - but decided to mix it up this time."

Alex Sparkes with friends Max Tracey and Adam Telling enjoys £ 4 burgers reduced from £ 8 at Pyrford Golf Club in Woking. Mr Sparkes said, "We're usually more into our fish dinner – especially on a big away sports day – but decided to mix it up this time."

Twitter user Vicky Osgood enjoyed a breakfast of nine items at Gloucester Services, including Bubble and Squeak and Haggis, and a coffee for £ 6.20. She tweeted, "Probably our last #EatOutToHelpOut meal, but we've got a cracker ready."

Mrs. Osgood's reception

Twitter user Vicky Osgood enjoyed a breakfast of nine items at Gloucester Services, including Bubble and Squeak and Haggis, and a coffee for £ 6.20. She tweeted, "Probably our last #EatOutToHelpOut meal, but we've got a cracker ready."

Guests joked that it was Food Binge Day and that they would try to "eat as much as possible" to get the most out of the program

Guests joked that it was Food Binge Day and that they would try to "eat as much as possible" to get the most out of the program

There were also long lines outside restaurants at Westfield Shopping Center in White City, West London.

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get to Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13, and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and learned that five people were ahead of them.

Jacob said, “I thought because there are so many restaurants in Westfield we wouldn't have to wait. But we went to Wagamamas and it looked like a 25 minute wait, and ping pong was even longer, about 40 minutes. & # 39;

One last roll of the dice? Chains continuing the Eat Out to Help Out program with their own money

Harvester

Toby Carvery

Franco Manca

Bills

Three Cheers Pub Company

Stonehouse pizza and carvery

Q Hotels Group

Signature Pub Group

True North Brew Co.

Cityglen pubs

The coconut tree

56 North Edinburgh

Smith's Restaurant, Uddingston

Peru Perdu, Manchester

Craft Dining Room, Birmingham

The wilderness, Birmingham

SIX, Cambridge

Harleys Smokehouse in Staffordshire

Meanwhile, 51-year-old carpenter Simon Davies barely had to queue when he stopped by his local Wetherspoons in nearby Shepherds Bush for a traditional breakfast and bud light for £ 3.85.

"You can't beat breakfast and a beer," he said. "It's less than you would pay for a sandwich and the food is great."

The Chancellor said that more than 64 million meals have been consumed since the initiative began in early August.

The program calls for the government to pay 50% of the bill up to £ 10 per capita in participating restaurants Monday through Wednesday in order to stimulate the hospitality industry and save jobs.

Reports that it could expand to serve hard-pressed city centers were denied today by a senior Treasury source who told MailOnline, "We love it as much as everyone else, but Rishi is very clear about hard stops."

The pub operator JD Wetherspoon has announced that it will be offering discounts on meals from Monday to Wednesday until at least November 11th, which the program describes as a "big boost" for the hotel industry.

Eat out to Help Out was part of an attempt to stimulate the hospitality industry and help beleaguered city centers following the coronavirus outbreak.

At Josie & # 39; s, one of the most popular cafes in Winchester, every table was full today.

Jackie Reis took her children Jessica (19), a waitress, and the accountant Brendon (25) to brunch with their partners.

"I just got back from Portugal and I've never felt safer," she said. “I felt safe there and I feel safe here. I have avoided large gatherings of people, but I am just looking forward to things getting back to normal. & # 39;

Her son Brendon agreed. "I've gone out a lot more since Eat Out To Help Out was introduced," he said. “I ended up spending a lot more than usual. It's like a store has a sale and you buy a lot of things that you never knew you needed.

“The opportunity to achieve such savings may never arise again. That's why I ate out two to three times a week. The scheme definitely worked. & # 39;

His partner, 24-year-old Zoe Martin, an elementary school teacher, agreed. "The fear is all behind us now," she said. "We're all just looking forward to a little bit of normalcy when school starts again next week."

Waitress Jessica Reis, who was with her family on her day off, said the opportunity to save had changed her habits. “Before Covid, I went out a few times a month. It's a weekly event now, ”she said.

Her partner, Rob King, 19, who works in a garage in Eastleigh, added that the discount "gave everyone the confidence we need to get the economy going".

"Everyone wants to make the most of it," he said. “At first there was a slight fear after we got out of the lock, but we soon shook it off.

London: Soho diners are served at tables on the street when they attend the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out discount

London: Soho diners are served at tables on the street when they attend the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out discount

Soho in London relaxed planning laws to allow restaurants to set up tables and chairs on closed streets (pictured today).

Soho in London relaxed planning laws to allow restaurants to set up tables and chairs on closed streets (pictured today).

“With security in place everywhere, we don't feel in danger and things are pretty much back to normal. But that could change if the cases suddenly increase. & # 39;

But the government's rebate program hadn't motivated everyone. Hannah Busby (25) and her sister Emily (22) stood in front of the café and tried to decide whether it was worth waiting three hours for a table.

"We expected it to be full, but not like this," Hannah said. “To be honest, we only came out because it's a holiday. Saving ten pounds is neither here nor there. & # 39;

Emily added, “The savings didn't make a consistently difference. We didn't usually go out Monday through Wednesday, and now either. We're only here for the bank holiday. & # 39;

Her friend, bricklayer Craig Caisley, 24, agreed. "People are motivated to go into town after the lockdown anyway," he said. "It's not really about the money."

In Hammersmith, West London, Liezle Greyling (49) was at a Wetherspoons and enjoyed the discount with her daughters Lilia (12) and Mea (9).

"Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds," she said. & # 39; It's wonderful. We used the scheme many times and have been to places like Tortilla and Nando. & # 39;

There were also long queues outside restaurants at the nearby Westfield Shopping Center, where Mother Pinz Sanie, 43, said she took advantage of the discount on each of the 13 days it was active.

A socially distant queue outside of 202, a high-end restaurant that specializes in brunch, in Notting Hill, west London

A socially distant queue outside of 202, a high-end restaurant that specializes in brunch, in Notting Hill, west London

Soho diners enjoy discounted lunches called "Rishi & # 39; s Dishes" on the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program.

Soho diners enjoy discounted lunches called "Rishi & # 39; s Dishes" on the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program.

Soho's China Town was full of hungry patrons who took advantage of the discount designed to boost trade in beleaguered city centers

Soho's China Town was full of hungry patrons who took advantage of the discount designed to boost trade in beleaguered city centers

A line outside a cafe in Leeds city center where parts of the street have been cut off to make room for social distancing

A line outside a cafe in Leeds city center where parts of the street have been cut off to make room for social distancing

A shopping center in Leeds where a line of people lined up for lunch in Nandos this afternoon

A shopping center in Leeds where a line of people lined up for lunch in Nandos this afternoon

A queue for Wagamamas in the Leeds shopping center. The government ruled today to extend the discount

A queue for Wagamamas in the Leeds shopping center. The government ruled today to extend the discount

People line up outside Wagamama in Windsor on Monday. Diners can claim 50% off meals up to £ 10 per head

People line up outside Wagamama in Windsor on Monday. Diners can claim 50% off meals up to £ 10 per head

Some stores vow to pull the discount out of their pockets to keep demand going. McDonald & # 39; s is pictured in Leeds

Some stores vow to pull the discount out of their pockets to keep demand going. McDonald & # 39; s is pictured in Leeds

Pinz Sanie, 43, (center) went to Wagamama in Westfield with her partner and children Simren, 9, Rohan, 7, today. She said, "We did it every day in a lot of different places like nandos ... we did." I queued for 15 minutes to get in as soon as it opens at 12pm.

Pinz Sanie, 43, (center) went to Wagamama in Westfield with her partner and children Simren, 9, Rohan, 7, today. She said, "We did it every day in a lot of different places like nandos … we did." I queued for 15 minutes to get in as soon as it opens at 12pm.

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get to Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13, and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and learned that five people were ahead of them

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get to Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13, and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and learned that five people were ahead of them

Liezle Greyling, 49, was with her daughters Lilia (12) and Mea (9) at a wetherspoons in Shepherds Bush, West London. "Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds," she told MailOnline. & # 39; It's wonderful. We used the scheme many times and have been to places like Tortilla and Nando.

Liezle Greyling, 49, was with her daughters Lilia (12) and Mea (9) at a wetherspoons in Shepherds Bush, West London. "Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds," she told MailOnline. & # 39; It's wonderful. We used the scheme many times and have been to places like Tortilla and Nando.

The Eat Out to Help Out program ends today as its inventor, Rishi Sunak, thanks guests for participating – but has urged them to keep eating out

29-year-old attorney Sarah Campbell stood in line next to them while she waited for a friend. "The weather also played a role," she said.

“I live in an apartment and when it was sunny I went to beer gardens a lot because I don't work on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

& # 39; The discount was nice, but it wasn't a deal breaker. I think it gave trust to a lot of people. And heaven knows we need it right now. & # 39;

Wetherspoon plans to maintain discounts after the Eat Out program ends

The pub operator JD Wetherspoon is starting its own program at reduced prices after the government's "Eat Out to Help Out" initiative has ended.

The move will lower prices on a range of food and beverages Monday through Wednesday through November 11th.

Lower prices begin Tuesday after the government's endeavors to encourage people to eat through meal subsidies in August.

Wetherspoon said the prices of some of its meals and drinks will be cheaper than those that are available to take away.

Chairman Tim Martin said, “The government's Eat Out to Help Out program has been extremely popular with our customers and has given the hospitality industry a huge boost.

& # 39; We want to offer our customers an excellent selection of food and drinks at a good price-performance ratio.

"Our offer means that a classic beef burger in our pubs is even cheaper than McDonald's."

19-year-old Manee and 19-year-old Meena from Southall stood in line for barely 10 minutes to get a table at Wagamamas in Westfield in White City, London.

Manee said, "We'd queue about 20 minutes before we left."

Not sure if Wagamamas had even done the Eat Out to Help Out, she said she would never get the opportunity to do so during the day because of her charity work.

When asked what they would get, Manee, who works at another Wagamama office at Heathrow Airport, said, "We usually get the pages, so we get them today."

Piers Morgan also praised the program, tweeted, “The Eat Out to Help Out program was a huge hit and helped so many restaurants / cafes / pubs get back on their feet.

"Once again, Rishi Sunak seems to be the only member of the government who knows what he's doing in this crisis."

When Mr. Sunak announced the end of the program, he said, “Towards the end of the Eat Out to Help Out program, I would like to thank the guests who have fallen in love with their region again.

& # 39; For the managers who have spent weeks making sure their restaurants are safe and for the chefs, waiters and waitresses across the country who have worked tirelessly, sometimes with more customers than ever before – everything helps protect 1.8 million jobs in the region in the hospitality industry.

"The program has reminded us why we like to eat out as a nation, and I urge guests to keep the momentum going to continue our economic recovery."

The idea of ​​keeping the program going is the subject of a live discussion in the Ministry of Finance.

A minister told The Daily Telegraph: “The program has been a great success in general, but it's all very good if you have a cheap meal at your local restaurant when those restaurants are already doing good business because of the folks at home working out.

"It is the target restaurants in the city centers that need help and that is where resources should be concentrated."

But a Treasury source has now ruled this out.

Diners queuing outside a Bill & # 39; s at Westfield Shopping Center in White City, West London for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

Diners queuing outside a Bill & # 39; s at Westfield Shopping Center in White City, West London for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

On social media, guests joked that it was "Food Binge Day" and that they were trying to "eat as much as possible". The queues outside of Westfield are pictured

On social media, guests joked that it was "Food Binge Day" and that they were trying to "eat as much as possible". The queues outside of Westfield are pictured

Ryan Palmer said he was having breakfast at Rishi while we still can when he shared this photo of a delicious meal at the Dishoom Indian restaurant

Ryan Palmer said he was having breakfast at Rishi while we still can when he shared this photo of a delicious meal at the Dishoom Indian restaurant

Guests celebrated their meal offerings today as they made the most of the program before it ended

Guests celebrated their meal offerings today as they made the most of the program before it ended

Guests celebrated their meal offerings today as they made the most of the program before it ended, including Chris Goldsmith visiting McDonalds

Piers Morgan hailed the program as "a great success", claiming that Mr. Sunak was "the only member of the government who knows what he is doing".

Piers Morgan hailed the program as "a great success", claiming that Mr. Sunak was "the only member of the government who knows what he is doing".

A Twitter user said he couldn't reserve a table "for love or money" because of the popularity of the government discount

A Twitter user said he couldn't reserve a table "for love or money" because of the popularity of the government discount

& # 39; Greedy Chancellor & # 39; tried bragging about meals in a chippy for a week – and then slammed it on social media when staff refused

By Rory Tingle for MailOnline

One "greedy" chancellor tried to brag about the Eat Out to Help Out program for a week of meals in a chippy – and then slammed it on social media when staff declined.

The man was eating alone at the Eglinton Diner and Fish Fry in Saltcoats, North Ayrshire when he ordered eight meals – one to eat and seven to take away for half price.

He told the workers it was "to keep it going for the next few days".

Angry employees told him the Eat Out to Help Out program shouldn't be used like this, but the "greedy" customer posted his complaint on social media and posted a review of the company on Facebook.

The man wrote, "The attitude is totally hectic and offensive, has lost eight different meals, KFC loved your money, long-time customers will never be back."

A post from Eglinton Diner and Fish Fry said, “I can only assume that you were the person in the diner yesterday who had dinner alone but ordered eight dinners.

“One for dinner and the other seven for takeout to keep you going for the next few days. Please read the rules on the Eat Out to Help Out scheme as this is certainly not the way it's supposed to work.

“It is people with their greed that jeopardize programs like this, and we value our business too much to bend the rules for greedy customers. I hope you enjoyed your meal. & # 39;

Eglinton Diner shared the "obviously angry customer" rating.

The company wrote, “I think the attitude of the staff was utterly incredulous. Trying to order eight meals for one person so he can get them for half the price. Incredible! & # 39;

A number of chains and agencies have announced that they will continue the practice through September, despite government funding being withdrawn.

The prices quoted by Wetherspoon for a range of food and drinks will be reduced Monday through Wednesday through November 11th.

Lower prices begin Tuesday after the government's endeavors to encourage people to eat through meal subsidies in August.

Wetherspoon said the prices of some of its meals and drinks will be cheaper than those that are available to take away.

Chairman Tim Martin said, “The government's Eat Out to Help Out program has been extremely popular with our customers and has given the hospitality industry a huge boost.

& # 39; We want to offer our customers an excellent selection of food and drinks at a good price-performance ratio.

"Our offer means that a classic beef burger in our pubs is even cheaper than McDonald's."

Jemima Ferguson, Marketing Director at itsu, said: & # 39; The program has been extremely successful for us at itsu.

& # 39; It helped make over 50% more transactions each week during the Eat Out to Help Out period without negatively affecting our trading during the rest of the week.

"We believe the positive effects of this program will last for many months."

Meg Ellis of Honest Burgers said: “We have been really encouraged by the energy transition in our sector as a result of the Eat Out to Help Out program.

“The program, which they liked very much, allowed us to get more people back into work. For some of our friends who work independently in the industry, this was the opportunity to safely open up for the first time.

"It was a pleasure to see vitality return to their restaurants."

The head of the pub chain Greene King told the BBC that the locations in the city center were still struggling, particularly in London, although some of the 3,100 locations saw a significant increase in sales.

Andy Lennox, who runs two Zim Braii restaurants in Bournemouth and also founded The Wonky Table network of around 500 hotel companies, said: “Trade is currently at a record breaking point.

& # 39; It's a fake bubble so don't get too excited, but Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday are likely up 100% year over year. The week is up 50%. Thursday has turned – it's the new Monday. & # 39;

Customers queuing outside Franco Manca in Southampton today for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

Customers queuing outside Franco Manca in Southampton today for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

Diners participating in the Eat Out To Help Out program in Windsor today as thousands rushed across the country to take advantage of it

Diners participating in the Eat Out To Help Out program in Windsor today as thousands rushed across the country to take advantage of it

The bills in Southampton were full of guests taking advantage of the discount today. Outdoor tables made it easy to manage the crowds

The bills in Southampton were full of guests taking advantage of the discount today. Outdoor tables made it easy to manage the crowds

There was also a socially distant queue outside of Bills in Southampton as customers snap to take advantage of the program before it ends

There was also a socially distant queue outside of Bills in Southampton, as customers snap to take advantage of the program before it ends

Diners at a Cafe Rouge in Windsor. Chancellor Rishi Sunak says the program gave restaurants a financial boost and helped people get back into the habit of eating out

Diners at a Cafe Rouge in Windsor. Chancellor Rishi Sunak says the program gave restaurants a financial boost and helped people get back into the habit of eating out

Customers waiting outside the Ivy in Winchester to take their seats for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

Customers waiting outside the Ivy in Winchester to take their seats for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out program

Diners enjoy seated meals outside a branch of the Balans Soho Society in Westfield Shopping Center in White City, west London

Diners enjoy seated meals outside a branch of the Balans Soho Society in Westfield Shopping Center in White City, west London

A queue of hungry customers outside Wagamamas in Westfield, one of the largest shopping malls in Europe

A queue of hungry customers outside Wagamamas in Westfield, one of the largest shopping centers in Europe

DOMINIC LAWSON: Now we're hungry again, we all have to keep eating for the UK

Good luck hopping into your favorite restaurant if you haven't booked well in advance.

This public holiday Monday is the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out program, on which guests can claim 50 percent of the cost of their meal (up to a maximum of £ 10 per capita) from the government.

Or rather, from all of us as taxpayers.

However, this is not the time to cavill. Chancellor Rishi Sunak's ploy was considered so unusual by Treasury officials that he forced them to approve it with a "ministerial order".

David Williams, owner of the Baltic Market in Liverpool, said companies "underestimated" the effect of Eat Out to Help Out

David Williams, owner of Liverpool's Baltic Market, said companies "underestimated" the effect of Eat Out to Help Out

This is the formal tool required when a permanent secretary (the most senior official in each department) believes that a spending proposal is “inadequate or poor value for money”.

The sheer volume of its use – no less than 64 million discounted meals were consumed in over 80,000 restaurants and pubs in the first three weeks – helped save our hospitality industry in a time of unprecedented economic peril.

shock

Perhaps officials believed the program would simply subsidize meals that were being sold anyway, or just move business to the early part of the week (the discount was available Monday through Wednesday).

However, the magnitude of the surge in demand, which in normal pre-Covid times is even above the level, suggests that much more has been done.

David Williams, owner of the Baltic Market, which hosts a dozen catering businesses in a converted 18th century Liverpool brewery, noted earlier this month, “People, including me, underestimated the effect it would have.

Chancellor is warned not to burden the middle class with fuel, capital gains, and pensions to pay off the coronavirus bill

Senior Tories last night urged Rishi Sunak to abandon plans for a £ 30 billion tax hike on concerns that it could slow economic recovery.

The Chancellor is reportedly considering a major tax levy in this fall's budget to fill the public finances gap after record spending on coronavirus.

Many of the proposals would hit the middle class and be better off.

Fuel tax, capital gains tax, corporation tax, triple pension block and pension tax relief should be in the line of fire

It is reported that the proposals have been worked out by tax officials as "options" for ministers in the budget set for November.

Ministers have not yet taken any decisions on how to deal with a deficit that is expected to exceed £ 300 billion this year.

However, a cabinet minister said the chancellor would face a revolt if he pushed ahead with tax collection.

"Such tax increases would be the worst economic policy at the moment," said the minister.

& # 39; It would guarantee a much deeper recession. Large parts of the economy are still fragile – we need to encourage it, not throttle it. & # 39;

"Most restaurants in Liverpool can't even get a table Monday through Wednesday all of August."

The program sent a rush through a population who refused to eat at all, not necessarily out of fear of infection, but just out of indolence or a habit acquired during the lockdown.

But there is a second, much less popular, government policy that must also celebrate the rescue (temporary or non-temporary) of countless small businesses related to domestic tourism.

This is the sudden imposition of quarantine restrictions on British people returning from certain other countries.

First it was Spain, then France, then Croatia.

Now even ultra-hygienic Switzerland has been removed from the list of nations with a quarantine-free “travel corridor” to Great Britain.

In all of these cases, the requirement that returning travelers should self-isolate for a fortnight has been enforced with little warning based on reported increases in Covid infections in affected countries.

This is the official line and is publicly justified in order to limit further outbreaks of the virus in the UK.

It is therefore strange that, unlike in other countries, the quarantine process seems to be monitored so ineffectively here.

As journalist Jenni Russell noted, “I walked through the Heathrow e-gates twice this summer and saw my fellow travelers passing through without filling out their forms or being stopped.

"There is no reinforcement of the quarantine report on arrival, no leaflets, no feeling that this is really important."

Hot spots

It's almost as if the real reason behind the seemingly capricious imposition of these requirements was to discourage people from vacationing overseas and instead spending their money here – as an added incentive to Sunak's Eat Out to Help Out program .

If so, it worked – and not just in hotspots as obvious as Cornwall, where every third job in the private sector is related to tourism.

James Mason, General Manager of Welcome to Yorkshire said, “We've been doing a roaring deal since July. . . Supply cannot meet demand and many companies say they are booked in September and October. & # 39;

Wales Tourism Alliance Chairman Andrew Campbell was pleased to report that self-catering are flying. It's booked to an unprecedented level. & # 39;

In 2018, international tourists in the UK spent just under £ 20 billion.

Given that the big donors, especially the Chinese and Americans, would always stay away from Britain this summer, it was imperative for British families to replace the absent foreign tourists.

That seems to have happened. In fact, we have just returned from a fortnight in Cornwall.

In our case, it was standard: in the more than a quarter of a century since our children were born, we have spent all but two of our summer holidays in Cornwall or the Isles of Scilly.

We were prepared for the Cornwall roads to be even more busy than usual in August – and they were.

Overfilled

Even so, the amazingly beautiful coastal path was in no way overcrowded and on our walks from the cabin we rented we were generally able to enjoy these magnificent views without anyone else in sight.

The point about tourism is that while the best known beauty spots are always inundated with vacationers, you don't have to be far off the beaten path to see less competitive attractions.

Some of the most sought after restaurants in England, including the Heron Inn in Malpas near Truro, dropped out of Eat Out to Help Out because they simply couldn't handle the amount of people who showed up

Some of the most sought-after restaurants in England, including the Heron Inn in Malpas near Truro, dropped out of Eat Out to Help Out because they simply couldn't handle the amount of people who turned up

But it was remarkable how some of the most sought-after restaurants got out of Eat Out to Help Out: they just couldn't handle the amount of people that showed up.

So we paid for lunch at the Heron Inn with its beautiful view of the estuary high above Truro.

Please note that we did not have a stay.

This term, properly used to describe those who spend their vacation at home, is now being applied to any vacation in their own country, which is nonsense.

In fact, the term "stay" describes what millions of Britons did for months during the lockdown and vacation.

But now that the UK eating and vacationing habits have returned, they must be continued even without Sunak's ingenious incentive.

Your nation's hostels need you.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) Coronavirus (t) UK Government News and UK Cabinet Updates (t) Rishi Sunak