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The demand for Covid exams is up to FOUR TIMES the capacity of the system.


The government's tsar, who tested coronavirus, sparked outrage today after claiming no one "expected" the demand for checks to "increase significantly" in recent weeks, despite schools returning and more people going back to work .

Baroness Harding, director of the NHS test and trace program, told MPs that "none of the modeling" indicated that requests for tests were rising so sharply.

She accused the government's Emergency Scientific Advisory Group (SAGE) of appearing to have made its predictions wrong, saying that testing capacity was built based on the panel's recommendations.

In the meantime, she found that the demand for Covid tests is currently up to four times the capacity of the system.

Their comments sparked a swift reprimand from MPs, who said it was clear that you had not prepared yourself enough as the government knew schools were reopening in early September and ministers were encouraging people to work from home .

The Tory peer's appearance before the Science and Technology Select Committee came when the government was facing increasing pressure because no tests were available nationwide.

There are widespread reports that people have to travel hundreds of kilometers to be screened and that people cannot book a test at all, despite the government's promise that testing capacity will reach 500,000 a day by the end of October.

Greg Clark, the Conservative chairman of the committee, told Lady Harding this afternoon: “Obviously you have not prepared yourself enough for the return of schools and the return of people to work.

“The fact that the target date for this capacity was late October was that you were expecting a second wave in October? Did it come earlier than expected? Is that the problem? "

Lady Harding replied, "I don't think anyone expected the demand to have really increased significantly in the past few weeks."

“None of the models expected this, so I said we all need to really think carefully about how to prioritize the use of these tests. We are sure that you should only be tested if you have the coronavirus symptoms. & # 39;

Lady Harding appeared to be trying to pass the money on to SAGE for testing problems, as she said the current 240,000 daily capacity had been set up "based on SAGE modeling for what we should prepare for fall".

She found that there is a staggering mismatch between the number of people who want tests and the ability to have them, as 27 percent of people who ask for a check have no symptoms.

She told MPs that she didn't have an exact number of how many people wanted tests. But she said phone calls and website visits indicated that there are "three to four times as many tests as we have available".

She denied the system was "down" and said processing of test results was deliberately delayed.

"We made a conscious decision because there has been a surge in demand to extend processing times in order to process more tests in the past few weeks," she said.

Lady Harding said the government was on track to increase capacity to 500,000 antigen tests per day by the end of October, but admitted that even that would not be enough. "I'm sure we will need more as we go past the end of October," she said.

Implementation of the government's testing program has led some MPs to call on Lady Harding to resign.

Richard Burgon, Labour's former secretary for shadow justice, said: "It is time for Dido Harding, director of the Test and Trace program, to be fired and replaced by an expert."

Another bruised day in the coronavirus crisis:

  • Boris Johnson was accused of "knocking around" today when he urged the British to "save Christmas" by following his "rule of six" – warning that the lockdown will only be tightened when the country hits the "hump." does not flatten the camel ";
  • 9.2 million people will be locked on site by tomorrow as the northeast will be added to the list from midnight.
  • According to a YouGov poll, Boris Johnson's approval ratings for the coronavirus crisis have hit a new low of minus 33 net.
  • The proportion of the public traveling to work has reached 62 percent, despite ministers hinting that an edict for working from home may be required again in the future.
  • Commons chairman Jacob Rees-Mogg risked a backlash when he complained that people should think "endlessly" about the difficulty of getting tests and people should celebrate the "phenomenal success" of the test system.

A coronavirus testing center near Heathrow Airport was so quiet today that no one could access the site within 90 minutes

The Tory peer was grilled by Science Committee Chair Greg Clark and other MPs

Baroness Harding

Baroness Dido Harding (right) was grilled by Science Committee Chair Greg Clark (left) and fellow MPs

Some test sites in Covid had long queues, like Southend-on-Sea, but others were abandoned even though people had difficulty getting examined

Some test sites in Covid had long queues, like Southend-on-Sea, but others were abandoned even though people had difficulty getting examined

Waiting times for Covid test results are increasing as the system struggles with demand

The percentage of people in England who received a personal Covid-19 test result within the government's 24-hour target period has bottomed since mid-June, new data shows.

Official NHS test and trace numbers also showed the weekly number of positive tests in England rose to its highest level since the system was introduced in late May.

About 33.3 percent of people who were tested for coronavirus in the week leading up to September 9 in England at a regional location, a local location or a mobile test unit – a so-called "personal" test – received their result within 24 hours Hours.

That's the lowest percentage since the week ended June 17, when the number was 31.3 percent.

According to statistics from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) on Thursday, the value of 33.3 percent has also fallen from 66.5 percent in the previous week.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson had previously promised that the results of all personal tests would be available within 24 hours by the end of June.

In the week leading up to September 9, a total of 18,371 new people tested positive for Covid-19 in England.

This is a 75 percent increase in positive cases over the previous week and the highest weekly number since Test and Trace started in late May.

There are fears that the country could go into a “lockdown” by default because people with mild symptoms cannot prove they are negative and must remain in quarantine.

Experts say maybe half a million people a day will develop Covid-like symptoms at this time of year, even during normal times. Hundreds of schools are already believed to be partially or completely closed as students and teachers have to self-isolate.

Lady Harding said patients, social care workers and NHS workers accounted for around half of the diagnostic tests available.

She said that in anticipation of the schools' return, we "have planned a substantial increase in testing capacity".

"As the Prime Minister said yesterday, we obviously do not have enough testing capacity today and we are doing everything in our power to increase testing capacity."

But Mr. Clark told her that the surge in demand was "completely predictable":

“It is disheartening to realize that we are now in September, under completely predictable circumstances – people are going back to school, people are going back to work – and we haven't established the proper capacity in the quieter periods of June, July and August August, ”he said.

Lady Harding said the "limitation" in the test system is in processing and in the laboratories.

She said there have been concerns that some labs have been over 100 percent busy lately.

"We need to limit the number of people who do tests at the test sites so there is no risk that these tests will be out of date when they are processed in the labs," she said.

“So I understand how frustrating it is when you arrive at the test site and it doesn't look like it's very crowded and you can see it can do more, but the capacity constraint is not in those test sites, it's back in the lab.

"And it would be very dangerous to send too many samples back to the lab and not have them processed and people don't know what their results were."

Lady Harding said the government could also use overseas laboratories to aid testing capacity.

These facilities were, among others, surge laboratories in the UK.

Lady Harding said these had a "low order tens of thousands" capacity.

The session took place as new numbers suggest that preschool-aged colds and coughs played a major role in the demise of the coronavirus testing system.

Details released today by the Ministry of Health show that government tests performed on children ages 5 to 9 in commercial laboratories rose 138 in early September, compared to a month earlier.

For 10 to 14 year olds, the numbers were even higher at 150 percent.

In contrast, the total number of tests in Pillar 2 only increased 29.1 percent.

Separate data showed that the proportion of people in England who received a personal Covid-19 test result within the government's 24-hour target period has reached its lowest level since mid-June.

Pre-school rhinitis leads to an increase in test demand

Official figures suggest that preschool-aged colds and coughs played a major role in the demise of the coronavirus testing system.

Details released today by the Ministry of Health show that government tests performed on children ages 5 to 9 in commercial laboratories rose 138 in early September, compared to a month earlier.

For 10 to 14 year olds, the numbers were even higher at 150 percent.

In contrast, the total number of tests in Pillar 2 only increased 29.1 percent.

Official NHS test and trace data also showed the weekly number of positive tests in England rose to its highest level since the system was introduced in late May.

About 33.3 percent of people who were tested for coronavirus in the week up to 9 September in England at a regional location, a local location or a mobile testing unit – a so-called "personal" test – received their result within 24 hours Hours.

That's the lowest percentage since the week ended June 17, when the number was 31.3 percent.

According to statistics from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) on Thursday, the value of 33.3 percent has also fallen from 66.5 percent in the previous week.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson had previously promised that the results of all personal tests would be available within 24 hours by the end of June.

In the week leading up to September 9, a total of 18,371 new people tested positive for Covid-19 in England.

This is a 75 percent increase in positive cases over the previous week and the highest weekly number since Test and Trace started in late May.

Politicians have questioned why Lady Harding was appointed amid public turmoil over the national lack of Covid testing.

The 52-year-old former TalkTalk performed alongside former Apple executive Simon Thompson, who was hired to run the contact tracing app project after the government abandoned an earlier attempt that was not working properly on iPhones.

Commons chairman Jacob Rees-Mogg risked a backlash today when he complained that people were "frolicking" over the difficulty of getting tests.

A SCHEDULE FOR THE AVAILABILITY OF COVID-19 TESTS IN THE UK

January – sick travelers: In the early days of the pandemic, before it was known that the virus was spreading in the UK, people could only be tested for coronavirus if they had symptoms of the disease – at the time a cough and / or fever – and had traveled there at risk Area or near someone who had.

Initially, this vulnerable area began with the city of Wuhan – ground zero of the pandemic – and was later expanded to include China as a whole and other countries such as Thailand, South Korea and later Italy.

March – Hospitals only: The tests were stopped for members of the public on March 12th. This now controversial move came because the virus was so out of control in travelers returning home from mid-term ski tours in the Alps in February that there wasn't enough testing to have any meaningful impact.

The only people who could get a Covid-19 test were hospital patients – those who were seriously ill – and employees who worked in the hospitals.

April – key workers: Swab tests returned to the public in April. Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced on April 23 that key workers and their families (with the exception of children under five) could be tested if they had symptoms – a new persistent cough or fever.

People who weren't a key force and didn't live with one, or who didn't have either of these symptoms, were still not allowed to get tested.

Late April – Over 65: End of month on April 29The tests have been expanded to allow people over 65 – with symptoms – to be tested. This age group has caused the vast majority of coronavirus deaths in the UK and is far worse for them than for younger people.

May – Anyone with Symptoms: On May 18Three weeks after the Health Department claimed it had met its goal of 100,000 tests a day – a claim that later turned out to be false – the tests were expanded again.

Now, according to the Minister of Health, anyone over five years with symptoms of Covid-19 – this list was expanded on the same day to include lost or changed smell or taste senses – can be tested.

Late May – Under-Fives: The rule was extended again on May 27th Include children under five, meaning anyone of any age in the UK was eligible for a test if they had Covid-19 symptoms.

That rule still applies – anyone with symptoms can have a test. It has never been government policy to offer tests to people who do not have any of the three symptomsHowever, there are a few exceptions, e.g. B. People taking part in studies or officially referred by their employer.

July – Tests for Nursing Homes: The government promised to offer routine swab tests for nursing home staff and residents 3rd of July. Nursing homes, where more than 14,000 people have died, suffered badly at the height of the crisis because they did not have access to large-scale testing.

Nursing homes currently run around 100,000 tests a day – about half the national capacity – to test all staff once a week and residents once a month.

This system is still fraught with problems, however, and Martin Green, CEO of Care England, told The Times: & # 39; There are delays with couriers failing to take swabs and problems with the laboratories, to get the results back in time …

"The test regime needs to be thoroughly reviewed."

August – tests for schools: As schools prepared to return to classes after a six-month hiatus from the lockdown and summer, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson promised that all schools would have access to DIY tests to send students home with symptoms.

However, teachers say they did not get enough tests and that students and staff who are unable to get tests through the national testing system languish in self-isolation at home, not knowing if they have Covid-19 or not Not.

Jim Blakely, director of the Garstang St. Thomas & # 39; School in Preston, told the Today program: & # 39; This is what we really need urgently … a 24-hour turnaround time on tests, ideally so families can get back to work and kids can go back to school. & # 39;

August – & # 39; Please take a test & # 39 ;: Baroness Dido Harding, head of NHS Test & Trace, urges the public to get tested.

Concerned that cases were not going down because people avoided using Test and Trace, she said, “Please do your part to keep the virus from flaring up again. This system only works if you sign up for a test and help us trace your contacts. So if you have mild symptoms, get a free trial right away. & # 39;

September – & # 39; Stop getting so many tests & # 39 ;: In September, Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged people to stop getting tested if they didn't have coronavirus symptoms.

He said an increase in "ineligible" people put a strain on the testing system, which now buckled under the pressure of processing 200,000 swabs a day.

The Department of Health estimates that one in four tests is now done by people who shouldn't be taking it.

Mr. Hancock continued the 9th of September: "We have seen an increase in demand, including from people who are not eligible for testing, from people who have no symptoms."

The number of people being tested for coronavirus has increased from under 20,000 in April to over 200,000 a day

The number of people being tested for coronavirus has increased from under 20,000 in April to over 200,000 a day

He insisted that people celebrate the "phenomenal success" of the test system.

“We all have a duty to stop the spread of the dangerous disease, but when it comes to testing, we've gone from a disease that nobody knew a few months ago to one that can live with nearly a quarter of a million people a day be tested, ”he told the Commons.

“And the prime minister expects up to half a million people a day to be living by the end of October.

“And instead of that endless carp saying it's hard to get, we should actually celebrate the phenomenal success of the British nation in running up to a quarter of a million tests on a disease that no one knew about until the beginning of the year. & # 39;

In the meantime, the public has continued to express anger at the difficulty in obtaining tests.

Truck mechanic Brad Cockburn made a 100-mile round trip from Bedale, North Yorkshire, to the Doxford Park test site in Sunderland, only to find that there were no staff, not even a tent or other infrastructure on the premises outside the building . City commercial area.

The 28-year-old said: "There is no organization, as always it is a low-piss performance."

His employer booked him the test because he felt he had flu-like symptoms and he won't be able to work until he has the all-clear.

Mr Cockburn said: “I took unpaid leave this afternoon and will not be able to work tomorrow. You're supposed to set up these things to get people back to work. Now all these people are gathering here and no one can test them. & # 39;

Rob Reid, a 58-year-old cash and carry manager from Sunderland, booked a test for 3:45 p.m. this morning only to find that there were no staff around. He said: 'It annoys me. I am concerned about my health and it turns out that when taking bookings on the NHS website the government is not so concerned and there is no one here to do it. & # 39;

When another driver was asked how he was feeling, he simply replied, "Stressed."

Although the number of cases has risen above 3,000 a day, it was initially among younger people, who are less likely to be severely impaired.

But now cases of Covid-19 among middle-aged people in England are on the rise and have increased over 90 percent in 14 days as the outbreak continues to worsen.

The prime minister claimed the infection map was gradually starting to resemble a camel's back, which is why ministers are taking new measures to ensure the virus does not “penetrate” the country.

Mr Johnson said, “All of this means Christmas that we want to protect, and we want everyone to have a fantastic Christmas.

“But the only way to make sure the country can enjoy Christmas is to be tough now. Now if we can grab it, stop the wave, stop the tip, stop the second hump of the dromedary, and then flatten the second hump.

& # 39; Dromedary or Camel? I can't remember if it's a dromedary or a camel that has two humps? Umm. Please check.

& # 39; Anyway, a double hump. So that's what we have to do! & # 39;

There were allegations today that Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty has called for an immediate two-week national lockdown and the actual number of daily cases could be 38,000.

However, Professor Carl Heneghan of Oxford University rejected the idea that the disease was "out of control" again.

"Most of the problems here were when you look at the data after Holiday Monday on September 2nd," he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

“You can argue here that one of the problems that came up here was significant people who met that weekend, and then we had a little boom.

& # 39; But the language of & # 39; & # 39; out of control, we need more tests, that's awful & # 39; must be called back. Look, we have problems, significant problems, but we also have changed policies every day.

“I think we have a big problem here, we are losing popular trust … This is a big moment right now and we need to slow down our thinking, pause and start being more analytical about the steps we are taking.

"We fall, like with the test and trace program, it falls over."

Dr. Adam Kucharski of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said the lack of testing means "blunt tools" are needed to control the outbreak.

"I think we're getting to a point where we may lose our ability to closely track the virus," he said today.

“That means that we could have a situation where there are risk groups. We are seeing more and more cases and we don't have a good warning about it.

'This also affects our ability to take more targeted and nuanced actions. When we are no longer able to track the virus, more blunt tools are provided. We saw that earlier in the year. & # 39;

It's the first chance in months that MPs Lady Harding will have a barbecue after the summer break.

Opposition MPs questioned the lack of apparent scrutiny over their role in Test and Trace and their appointment as head of Public Health England's successor, the National Institute for Health Protection.

Labor MP Barry Sheerman tweeted, "What has Dido Harding actually accomplished since she was thrown into the House of Lords and (responsible) for Johnson's NHS Test and Trace program?"

Ian Lavery, the Wansbeck Labor MP, questioned the decision to hire them to test and outsource testing centers to the private company Serco.

He said it was "the perfect ingredient for a messy disaster … where decent people pay the price".

Her appointment was controversial because her professional background was more in business than public health, and given her role as a civil servant, she refused to sit as a cross-bench peer rather than a Tory.

She was blamed for the government's first attempt to develop a contact tracking app, which was announced in April.

The £ 11 million app was abandoned after the government admitted it hadn't worked.

The replacement app with Google and Apple technology is set to roll out in England and Wales next week, months after similar apps were rolled out in other developed countries.

Baroness Harding was the managing director of telecommunications giant TalkTalk when hackers were able to access data associated with 157,000 customers, including bank account details.

The breach cost the company an estimated £ 77 million, including a record £ 400,000 fine imposed by the Information Commissioner's office.

Dido Harding: The Tory peer, hailed by Hancock for "fantastic leadership," watched over months of the farce

Baroness Dido Harding was hailed by Health Secretary Matt Hancock on her appointment in May for “fantastic leadership”.

This has become a national embarrassment after the Tory peer was tasked with implementing the new NHS app, mass testing and contact tracing program in May.

Baroness Harding is a former jockey despite quitting after 40 and promising her husband that she will quit

The app has been massively scaled down and it could be next year when a full mass testing scheme is in place.

The government responded to her failure by giving her another job.

Last month she was provisionally held responsible for the replacement position for Public Health England.

Experts said it made as much sense to appoint their interim head of the new National Institute for Health Protection (NIHP) as Chris Whitty (England's chief medical officer) was made head of Vodafone.

This was an indication of Harding's lack of public health experience and her previous tenure as managing director of telecommunications giant TalkTalk, where she oversaw one of the UK's worst data breaches, where hackers stole bank details from 157,000 customers.

Baroness Dido Harding of Winscombe, 53, grew up on a pig farm in Somerset and is the granddaughter of Field Marshall Lord Harding, the desert rat commander who became the oldest soldier in the British Army.

A former jockey, she is married to John Penrose, Conservative MP for Weston-super-Mare.

She studied politics, politics and economics alongside David Cameron at Oxford University and after graduating she held a number of positions at Thomas Cook, Woolworths, Tesco and Sainsbury & # 39; s.

Baroness Harding was named CEO of TalkTalk in 2010 and served in that role for seven years. During that time, the company was the victim of a cyber attack that captured the personal and banking information of 157,000 customers accessed by hackers.

After the hack, she was repeatedly blackmailed, requesting bitcoins in exchange for stolen data, including customer names, email addresses, cell phone numbers, home addresses and dates of birth.

As a result, TalkTalk was fined £ 400,000 for security breaches that allowed data to be accessed “without any hassle” in one of the largest data breaches in history.

TalkTalk is believed to have lost £ 60million to the fallout, with an estimated 100,000 disgruntled customers, mostly BT, leaving, while 2015 profit halved to £ 14million and stocks lost nearly two-thirds of their value.

Baroness Harding has been repeatedly asked to resign for the violation but remained in place until 2017 when she resigned to focus on her "charitable activities".

Later that year she was named chairman of NHS Improvement, which is responsible for overseeing all NHS hospitals.

As a powerful figure, she refuses to believe that her gender ever held her back, nor will she advocate female quotas on corporate boards, which she views as political interference.

She also believes workers have too much maternity leave, although she has to admit that as a boss, she can successfully balance her own career with the time with the two daughters she has with her husband.

Earlier this year she was criticized for her role on the board of the Cheltenham Festival organizer, the Jockey Club.

Scientists have called the festival, which took place in March, a "disaster", claiming it accelerated the spread of the coronavirus in the UK after 260,000 people flocked to the racetrack a few days before the lockdown began.

ANDREW PIERCE: The test fiasco threatens to close hundreds of schools … so where on earth was Dido Harding?

Dido Harding goes to 10 Downing Street on September 16

Dido Harding goes to 10 Downing Street on September 16

By Andrew Pierce for the Daily Mail

As the test fiasco threatens to close hundreds of schools, the deafening question is: What is Test-and-Trace Tsarina Baroness Harding doing about the crisis?

There was hardly a trace of her. The former businesswoman, who was named in a public relations fire in May, appears to have largely gotten out of hand.

She was seen on Downing Street yesterday, but she was not seen in television studios or seen on our radio waves to explain what went wrong. Instead, she left Health Secretary Matt Hancock to face the flak.

Humiliatingly, six months after the pandemic, Hancock had to admit yesterday that Covid tests need to be rationed to the general public to ensure frontline workers can get a test along with nursing home residents.

This is despite Boris Johnson's commitment in June to promise "world's best" service, with all test results flipped within 24 hours. The testing crisis dominated the Prime Minister's questions yesterday. Still, Harding kept her head under the parapet and avoided interview requests.

She hasn't said anything about testing on Twitter since July.

"She's a cross between the Scarlet Pimpernel and Macavity, the cat who was never there when there were problems," said an angry Whitehall source. "The test and trace system implodes, but the baroness is silent."

Although more and more Tory MPs are criticizing the test system, Harding has so far taken the chance to defend it in the House of Lords, to which she was appointed in 2014. In fact, she has not spoken in the House of Lords since March 24th, when she spoke about Covid for four minutes, emphasizing the importance of expanding testing capacity.

The omens for her tenure as test and trace czar were hardly favorable. One of their first actions in July was to remove a table showing the UK's progress on major coronavirus tests based on the daily Downing Street briefings. Around the same time, the much-touted NHS test and trace app was delayed because the technology wasn't up to date.

Humiliatingly, six months after the pandemic, Hancock had to admit yesterday that Covid tests need to be rationed to the general public to ensure frontline workers can get a test along with nursing home residents

Humiliatingly, six months after the pandemic, Hancock had to admit yesterday that Covid tests need to be rationed to the general public to ensure frontline workers can get a test along with nursing home residents

That same month, Harding, who has no scientific background, appeared disastrously before the Commons Health Committee when she refused to say what proportion of the tests were completed within the 24-hour period promised by the Prime Minister. Former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, chairman of the committee, couldn't hide his anger at her refusal to answer questions. "You are telling me that you actually don't know how many tests come back in a 24-hour period and that you are responsible for the NHS testing and tracking," he said.

Since the bloody encounter, Harding seems to have withdrawn from the public. However, this does not mean that it is less influential in government circles.

In August, when the government announced it was cutting Public Health England, it emerged that Baroness Harding – an Oxford contemporary of David Cameron – would head the agency it replaces, the National Institute for Health Protection. Interestingly, she is married to Tory MP John Penrose, who is on the board of the & # 39; 1828 & # 39; think tank. is that has called for the abolition of Public Health England.

"Dido Harding locked himself in the old Public Health England building where the new National Institute was built," claims the Whitehall source. "The real priority should be to test yourself, but we can't get her out of hiding."

Baroness Dido Harding at a press conference on Downing Street in July

Baroness Dido Harding at a press conference on Downing Street in July

Harding, a former jockey, is also on the board of directors of the Jockey Club, known to host the Cheltenham Festival and draw 250,000 people when bans worldwide went into effect

Harding, a former jockey, is also on the board of directors of the Jockey Club, which hosted the Cheltenham Festival and attracted 250,000 people when bans went into effect worldwide

While Harding was CEO of TalkTalk in 2015, the company suffered one of the largest data breaches in commercial history when the private data of 4 million customers was hacked. That year she received £ 2.8 million, an increase of £ 1 million over the previous year. Despite being asked to resign, she stayed at the helm until 2017.

She then moved to NHS Improvement, an organization that oversees NHS trusts, for which she received £ 62,000 for a three-day week. Als der Commons-Gesundheitsausschuss ihre Ernennung prüfte, bemerkte er ihren „völligen Mangel an Erfahrung“ in Gesundheitsfragen.

Harding, ein ehemaliger Jockey, ist auch im Vorstand des Jockey Clubs, der das Cheltenham Festival veranstaltete und 250.000 Menschen anzog, als weltweit Sperren in Kraft traten.

Die Enkelin von Feldmarschall Lord Harding, der der älteste Soldat der britischen Armee wurde, wuchs auf einer Schweinefarm in Somerset auf und besuchte die katholische Privatschule St. Antony's Leweston. In einem Interview von 2015 gab sie zu: „Ich habe eine enorm privilegierte Position. Ich verdiene viel Geld – eine Angelegenheit, die öffentlich bekannt ist – ich habe eine Menge Hilfe und ich habe mehr Kontrolle über den Tag und das, was ich tue, als jemand, der an der Kasse arbeitet. & # 39;

Da sie heute vor einem ausgewählten Komitee steht, erklärt sie vielleicht, warum sie die Kontrolle über das Test- und Trace-System verloren hat.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Coronavirus (t) NHS