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The death of the Franco-Irish teenager in Malaysia was a "mishap".


The family of a London school girl found dead while on vacation in a Malaysian jungle said they were "utterly disappointed" by a medical examiner's death sentence for an accident.

15-year-old Nora Quoirin was found dead nine days after she disappeared in August 2019.

Her family said testimony during the investigation in the Southeast Asian state indicated that she was abducted and described Monday's official results as "incomplete".

Her statement added, "We see again that justice struggles to support the most vulnerable in society – dealing with special needs only at the superficial level – and not at the level that really reflects children like Nora."

Nora Quoirin's body was discovered after a rainforest hunt after it disappeared from a resort outside of Kuala Lumpur in 2019

Nora's mother Meabh, pictured with the Malaysian police, believed she had been kidnapped and said the teenager never climbed out the window of the chalet they were staying in in the middle of the night, the authorities believe

Nora's mother Meabh, pictured with the Malaysian police, believed she had been kidnapped and said the teenager never climbed out the window of the chalet they were staying in in the middle of the night, the authorities believe

Quoirin died after getting lost in an abandoned palm oil plantation, a Malaysian coroner said, ruling out murder or sexual assault.

Nora Quoirin's body was discovered in 2019 after a massive hunt through the Kuala Lumpur rainforest.

Police insisted there wasn't a bad game, and an autopsy performed in Malaysia found that she likely starved to death and died of internal bleeding after days in the jungle.

Her family added, “We believe we fought not just for Nora, but in honor of all of the special needs children in the world who deserve our most dedicated support and the most diligent application of justice.

"This is Nora's unique legacy and we will never let go of it."

Her relatives realized that there was no physical evidence that could help the coroner.

Her family added, "We believe we fought not only for Nora, but in honor of all of the special needs children in the world who deserve our most dedicated support and the most diligent application of justice." File image of Meabh Quoirin above

Her family added, "We believe we fought not only for Nora, but in honor of all of the special needs children in the world who deserve our most dedicated support and the most diligent application of justice." File image of Meabh Quoirin above

Even so, we are extremely disappointed with the coroner's verdict of the mishap.

“We saw 80 slides presented to the court today, none of which dealt with Nora – neither her personality nor her intellectual abilities.

"The verdict focused solely on physical evidence and physical mobility – which we think is a very incomplete / selected theory about how Nora came to be dead."

UK Nationals Overseas Charity, LBT Global, has been and has been supporting the family since they disappeared.

CEO Matthew Searle said, “This is an extremely disappointing day for the family.

& # 39; It is clear that Nora could not have physically performed the suggested movements.

“To make a full judgment, the coroner must have fully considered Nora's condition – that this is not immediately apparent.

"We will work tirelessly to support the family as they move forward."

Nora's mother watched the trial online and bowed her head as the verdict was announced. The coroner also said there was no evidence that the 15-year-old was murdered or sexually assaulted.

Her family said testimony during the investigation in the Southeast Asian state indicated that she was abducted and described Monday's official results as "incomplete".

Her parents thought she was kidnapped and said the teen never climbed out the window of the chalet they were staying in in the middle of the night the authorities believe.

However, after an investigation in Malaysia, Coroner Maimoonah Aid decided that she had died of an "accident".

Nora Quoirin's body was discovered in 2019 after a massive hunt through the Kuala Lumpur rainforest

Nora Quoirin's body was discovered in 2019 after a massive hunt through the Kuala Lumpur rainforest

"After hearing all the relevant evidence, I realize that no one was involved in Nora Anne's death," she told a court in Seremban city.

"It is likely that she died by accident."

The teenager likely left the family home "on her own and then got lost," she said, sharing her decision online over the coronavirus pandemic.

The schoolgirl's body was found in a creek in the jungle near the resort after a 10-day hunt with hundreds of rescuers, helicopters and sniffer dogs.

It took the coroner two hours to deliver the verdict and went through the testimony of over 40 witnesses presented during the investigation from late August to December.

Not only did she say there was no evidence to support the theories of murder or sexual assault, but she also opted against “open judgment” – something the teen's family had pushed for.

Instead, Maimoonah focused on the fact that after a long trip from the UK and activities at Dusun Resort, the family was likely exhausted on the day they arrived in August 2019.

“The family was all jet lagged and tired,” she said.

"Nora Anne had also shown that her tiredness was increasing."

Members of a rescue team are seen behind a police line at Dusun Resort in Seremban on August 13, 2019

Members of a rescue team are seen behind a police line at Dusun Resort in Seremban on August 13, 2019

Nora disappeared near Duson Resort outside of Kuala Lumpur in August 2019

Nora disappeared near Duson Resort outside of Kuala Lumpur in August 2019

This made it likely that the teen, in a "strange and new place", had wandered on his own from the London-based family's accommodation on his first night at the resort, she said.

Maimoonah also noted that the teen's mother said she was able to climb stairs herself, suggesting that she could have got out of her chalet on her own.

During the investigation, the teen's parents said they heard mysterious "muffled noises" coming from the shelter the night the school girl went missing, leading them to believe she had been kidnapped.

On their testimony, police reiterated their view that the teenager had migrated alone and defended their approach, insisting that a thorough search be conducted.

But her parents, who testified via video link from the UK, painted a different picture and sharply criticized the authorities for their reaction to their daughter's disappearance.

The five-acre resort is next to a stretch of dense jungle and at the foot of a mountain range.

The teenager had a condition known as holoprosencephaly, in which the brain does not develop normally. She had limited verbal communication and could only write a few words.

She attended a school for young people with learning difficulties.

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