ENTERTAINMENT

The Covid exodus begins: every tenth city dweller is planning to move to the countryside or the coast


One in ten city dwellers who work from home plans to move to rural areas or to the coast, new figures show.

Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that people with office jobs want to leave built-up areas in the countryside.

The news will be another nail in the coffin for the disputed Main Street as prospective customers plan their exodus.

The report, which is made up of surveys that tracked the effects of Covid-19, found that 29 percent of working adults "changed jobs during the pandemic and plan to continue working from home at least temporarily."

It added: "Of those planning to work from home, wholly or partially, 12 percent said they have considered moving to another location in the UK, most often to rural or coastal areas."

Office for National Statistics data shows people in office jobs are keen to leave built-up areas in the countryside (Image: Shaftesbury in Dorset).

In the meantime, around 1.15 million people are debating leaving city residences to flee into the country or to the coast (picture Port Isaac in Cornwall)

In the meantime, around 1.15 million people are debating leaving city residences to flee to the country or to the coast (picture Port Isaac in Cornwall).

It means an astonishing 9.5 million working Britons – out of a possible 33 million – are out of the office.

Around 1.15 million are now debating whether to leave the city residences to flee to the country or to the coast.

An estimated 60 percent of them want to move to rural areas, while 40 percent want to live by the sea.

Elsewhere in the ONS report, 64 percent of workers started commuting again last week – ahead of Boris Johnson's recent coronavirus measures.

The Prime Minister turned to the office embassy this week following the emerging Covid cases.

The UK coronavirus outbreak appears to be accelerating again, official data shows.

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded today, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded today, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago

Some top scientists had insisted that there was no real increase in cases because the test positivity rate - how many cases were found for each completed swab - hadn't changed much

Some top scientists had insisted that there was no real increase in cases because the test positivity rate – how many cases were found for each completed swab – hadn't changed much

Another 6,874 Covid-19 cases were recorded today, meaning the seven-day moving average is 54 percent higher than a week ago.

The MailOnline analysis shows that this is the sixth day in a row on which the average has increased compared to the previous week.

Before last Saturday, the weekly growth rate of the coronavirus had been falling every day for a full week.

It had fallen from 84 percent on September 12 to 20 percent on September 19.

Meanwhile, key government science advisors, Professor Chris Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance, terrified the nation with their dire prediction that if nothing is done, cases could hit 50,000 a day by mid-October.

They claimed that infections were doubling every week, commensurate with the growing outbreaks in Spain and France.

But scientists shot down the claims, warning that they were based on ancient data based on only a few hundred positive cases.

Another 6,634 Covid-19 cases were recorded yesterday, which means the average number of infections daily is 48 percent higher than a week ago

Another 6,634 Covid-19 cases were recorded yesterday, which means the average number of infections daily is 48 percent higher than a week ago

Even Boris Johnson distanced himself from the claims, saying the outbreak could double up to every 20 days.

Other numbers from NHS Test and Trace also suggest cases decreased last week.

However, the latest stats – released yesterday – only go until September 16, which means an increase over the past week has yet to be confirmed in another dataset.

Health Department figures show that the rate of doubling cases is around two weeks.

Currently, nearly 5,000 people are diagnosed with Covid-19 every day, up from 2,500 on September 10.

However, this is based on laboratory-confirmed infections and thousands of patients will never develop symptoms.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which measures the size of the outbreak through thousands of random swab tests, estimates that cases have increased 60 percent in one week to 9,600 per day.

While researchers at King & # 39; s College London behind a symptom tracking app say it has doubled to around 16,000 over the same period.

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