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The couple discovers 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in their New York state house


Wall to wall liquor! The couple discovers 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey worth $ 1,000 called "Old Smugglers" hidden in the walls and floorboards of their Upstate, NY, house that once belonged to a German baron pirate

  • Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker bought a fixer upper in the city of Ames late last year 1915
  • The couple began renovating the residence last month and discovered bottles of whiskey hidden between walls and under floorboards
  • They found 66 bottles of Old Smuggler Gaelic Whiskey and believe there could be more hidden around the house
  • The house belonged to Count Adolph Humpfner, who mysteriously died in 1932 and left a great fortune
  • At the time of his death, locals were baffled by how he had made such a large amount of money, but it appears that he was a prominent pirate during Prohibition
  • The Prohibition Era – which lasted from 1920 to 1933 – made millionaires out of men and women who smuggled illegal alcohol from Canada into the United States

A couple were stunned after finding 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in the walls and floorboards of their New York state home.

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker bought the property in Ames town late last year and learned that it once belonged to a “childless German baron who turned to piracy in the 1920s”.

The couple passed the story on as nothing more than folklore until they began renovating the 105-year-old residence last month and discovered alcohol hidden in the spaces between the walls and floors.

Drummond told CNN that he was removing the siding from a mud room when he found the whiskey bottles wrapped in brown paper.

A New York couple were stunned after finding 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in the walls and floorboards of their upstate home. All bottles are Old Smuggler Gaelic Whiskey – a Scottish label that is still produced today

Drummond told CNN that when he found the whiskey bottles wrapped in brown paper, he was removing the siding from a mud room

Drummond told CNN that when he found the whiskey bottles wrapped in brown paper, he was removing the siding from a mud room

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker (pictured) bought the property late last year in the town of Ames and learned that it once belonged to a "childless German baron who turned to piracy in the 1920s".

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker (pictured) bought the property late last year in the town of Ames and learned that it once belonged to a "childless German baron who turned to piracy in the 1920s".

The three-story house in Ames is shown. Drummond and Bakker had no idea of ​​the property's incredible history when they made the purchase last year

The three-story house in Ames is shown. Drummond and Bakker had no idea of ​​the property's incredible history when they made the purchase last year

'I'm like what is that? I was very confused … I'm like holy crap. It's like a supply of whiskey. And that's suddenly like the whole pirate story (makes sense). & # 39;

Drummond shared a video on his Instagram page of the remarkable moment that recently attracted thousands of new followers.

"OUR WALLS ARE MADE OF BOOZE!" he wrote.

“I can't believe the rumors are true! He was actually a pirate! I mean, I thought it was a cute story, but the builder of our house was actually a pirate! & # 39;

The couple discovered 42 bottles of whiskey in the wall room. All bottles are Old Smuggler Gaelic Whiskey – a Scottish label that is still produced today.

However, Drummond and Bakker discovered even more hidden alcohol under floorboards in the mud room.

Drummond and Bakker discovered even more alcohol hidden under floorboards in the mud room

Drummond and Bakker discovered even more alcohol hidden under floorboards in the mud room

Bottles of the whiskey - at least 90 years old - were discovered wrapped in brown paper

Bottles of the whiskey – at least 90 years old – were discovered wrapped in brown paper

So far, the two have found 66 bottles in total and say they are likely to encounter others as they continue their renovations.

Drummond then began researching the history of the house and learned that the rumors that it was a childless German baron who turned to piracy were true.

The original owner was a German man named Count Adolph Humpfner, who mysteriously died in 1932, leaving a huge fortune.

"His estate was worth over $ 140,000 in 1932," Drummond told his Instagram followers.

& # 39; He had many aliases and was known as the mysterious man of the Mohawk Valley and & # 39; the count & # 39 ;; although there was never any proof of his royalty beyond his own claims.

“Back then, it was a mystery to the locals how he amassed his fortune. He owned a local bank, high school, and 23 properties in NYC and NJ. & # 39;

Now it seems obvious that he amassed his fortune through piracy during the Prohibition Period, which lasted from 1920 to 1933.

Ames is about halfway between New York City and the Canadian border, making it the perfect spot for pirates who may have imported illegal alcohol from the north.

Drummond then began researching the history of the house and learned that the rumors that it was a childless German baron who turned to piracy had some truth.

Drummond then began researching the history of the house and learned that the rumors that it was a childless German baron who turned to piracy had some truth.

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