ENTERTAINMENT

The council accidentally distributes USED Covid test swab kits to students


Used Covid nasal swabs are being given out to students by council workers as part of the local testing program in Birmingham

  • Students in Selly Oak received incorrectly used Covid-19 test kits on Tuesday
  • Tests conducted as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop and collect service
  • The council confirmed the bug affected seven homes, but said only one kit was opened

Around 25 used coronavirus swab tests were mistakenly distributed to students yesterday as part of a local testing scheme.

Seven households in Selly Oak, Birmingham received the finished kits on Tuesday as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service.

Students were "shocked and concerned" after opening the boxes to discover sealed bags, some of which had names and addresses written on the plastic.

The council conducted an overnight investigation which found "no evidence of cross-contamination," reports the BBC.

A spokeswoman added that the bug affected seven houses and only the outer box of one kit was opened.

RAF staff in Selly Oak, near the University of Birmingham, are helping distribute the Birmingham City Council's coronavirus tests

The kits were distributed as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service, which aims to increase testing in areas with high infection rates.

As part of the program, volunteers visit households to offer tests on their doorstep before returning an hour later to pick up the finished kits.

Around 100 military personnel are working with Birmingham City Council on the initiative, but it was confirmed today that they were not involved in the bug.

News of the bug came Tuesday when a Birmingham University student warned others about the bug on a Facebook community page.

She wrote: & # 39; Anyone on [Tiverton Road] who has received a Covid test from men in safety vests does not open!

Seven households in Selly Oak, Birmingham, received the finished kits Tuesday as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service. Pictured: RAF personnel in Selly Oak

Seven households in Selly Oak, Birmingham received the finished kits on Tuesday as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service. Pictured: RAF personnel in Selly Oak

The council conducted an overnight investigation which found there was no evidence of cross-contamination

The council conducted an overnight investigation which found there was no evidence of cross-contamination

"They're already done – we opened the box and they were sealed and torn, so obviously used!"

Another student, Sophie Dunne, told the university newspaper Redbrick that several students had emerged from their homes to alert the volunteers to the mistake.

She claims they were told not to post it on social media.

Ms. Dunne said officers returned five minutes later to pick up the Covid-19 tests, but not until a kit was opened by her roommate.

Birmingham is part of the second tier of the three tier system of coronavirus restrictions that went into effect across England today.

The city, with 167.4 coronavirus cases per 100,000 residents, is facing tough crackdown on inter-household socialization alongside Greater Manchester and the Northeast.

The kits were distributed as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service, which aims to increase testing in areas with high infection rates

The kits were distributed as part of the Birmingham City Council's drop-and-collect service, which aims to increase testing in areas with high infection rates

A council spokeswoman added that the bug affected seven homes and only one box was opened

A council spokeswoman added that the bug affected seven homes and only one box was opened

Official PHE figures show how the case rate in Birmingham rose from 30 per 100,000 in late August to 78 per 100,000 in September

Official PHE figures show how the case rate in Birmingham rose from 30 per 100,000 in late August to 78 per 100,000 in September

People on alert are prohibited from meeting people outside their household or "gushing" indoors, including in pubs and restaurants.

A council spokesman said: “We are aware that a small number of tests were incorrectly conducted during the Selly Oak drop and collect activities yesterday.

“We want to reassure residents that none of these tests have been reused. While the outer package of one was opened, the inner package with the swab remained sealed and secure so there was no risk of contamination.

& # 39; The team was notified within five minutes that the wrong tests were being issued and immediate steps were taken to correct the error.

& # 39; Drop and Collect is an essential part of fighting the spread of Covid in our city. Around 100,000 tests have been carried out to date.

"The circumstances of this seven houses and 25 kits incident are being fully reviewed and any necessary changes to the process will be implemented."

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