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The CIA downgraded more than two million pages of UFO documents


The CIA has released a treasure trove of more than two million documents about UFO sightings and research from the 1970s.

The remarkable dossier, filled with the CIA's claims, contains every single one of its files on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAPs) – the government's official name for so-called UFOs – and was posted on The Black Vault's website on Thursday.

Black Vault founder John Greenewald Jr. has been suing the CIA for the past two decades to publish the records and then scan the pages one by one.

The dossier was released ahead of the June deadline to allow U.S. intelligence agencies to disclose everything they know about UFOs to Congress under a clause that was included in the December 2 coronavirus alleviation bill signed by President Donald Trump in December . $ 3 trillion was raised.

A DailyMail.com review of about three dozen of the 700+ files in the Black Vault database, which could take weeks to fully cook through, revealed some confusing examples of UAP sightings.

More than two million pages of approved CIA reports on UFOs from the 1970s posted on The Black Vault's website Thursday (file photo)

Urgent UFO information is given to the CIA's top scientist for review in 1976

When asked which documents had piqued his interest, Greenewald highlighted a report on what appeared to be urgent UFO information that was given in April 1976 to an assistant deputy director of science and technology at the CIA.

Most of the details of the information were edited in the document, but Greenewald said he was determined to uncover more through further FOIA inquiries.

The assistant director's name was also changed, but records show that Carl Duckett was serving in that position at the time.

The document states: “We contacted A / DDS & T (Dr (edited)) to see if he knew about a UFO program and to answer (edited) questions.

Dr. (edited) showed interest in (edited) hand-brought into his office. After a brief examination of the content, Dr. (edited) to deal with the matter personally and to contact us. & # 39;

A second document dated June 1976 appears to request an update to the review, but there is no record of the ordeal afterwards.

The heavily edited report above describes what appears to be urgent UFO information that will be passed to an assistant deputy director of science and technology in April 1976

The heavily edited report above describes what appears to be urgent UFO information that will be passed to an assistant deputy director of science and technology in April 1976

CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a "mysterious explosion" in the small Russian town of Sasovo in 1991

In another report, CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a "mysterious explosion" in the small Russian town of Sasovo in 1991.

Residents said they saw a "fiery ball" descend from the sky before a shock wave raced through the city and aligned an entire block.

According to the report, investigators had not reached a conclusion about the cause of the explosion and left the possibility of UFOs open.

It reads: “Some people speak of ammunition that has been buried since the last war, while others claim that a powerful bomb fell. A third group blames a meteorite, and a fourth group blames UFOs … There are people who are said to have seen a moving "fiery ball". & # 39;

Among the more than 700 files in the Black Vault database is this report in which CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a "mysterious explosion" in a small Russian town

Among the more than 700 files in the Black Vault database is this report in which CIA officials discuss the possibility that UFOs were behind a "mysterious explosion" in a small Russian town

UFO sighted in Morocco in 1976

One of the most heavily edited documents examined by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976 and contains the words: "To the immediate director – with a personal request to investigate the UFO sighted in Morocco."

The full-page report is covered in 25 black lines that appear to have been drawn directly with a pen.

The report was first approved for publication in February 2010, it says in a footnote.

One of the most heavily edited documents examined by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976 and contains the words: "To the immediate director - with a personal request to investigate the UFO sighted in Morocco".

One of the most heavily edited documents examined by DailyMail.com is dated September 23, 1976 and contains the words: "To the immediate director – with a personal request to investigate the UFO sighted in Morocco".

Many of the files are similarly edited to remove almost every detail beyond the word UFO.

Some in the mix just mention the keywords "UFO", "UAP" or "extraterrestrial" in the context of unrelated subjects and offer little to no insight into the CIA's overall knowledge of these keywords.

For example, a document entitled "Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed" describes a discussed French study of a force that could be used to deflect UFOs – defined in the document as "unwanted flying objects" – not unknown.

Another document was added because it contained a newspaper column about a Bosnian refugee in which the author mocked the Pentagon's failure to find the man despite "communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings."

A document entitled "Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed" describes a French study of a force that could be used to deflect UFOs - defined in the document as "unwanted flying objects" - not unknown

A document entitled "Hypervelocity Test Techniques Discussed" describes a French study of a force that could be used to deflect UFOs – defined in the document as "unwanted flying objects" – not unknown

Another document was added to the pile because it contained a newspaper column on a Bosnian refugee in which the author mocked the Pentagon's failure to find the man despite "communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings."

Another document was added to the pile because it contained a newspaper column on a Bosnian refugee in which the author mocked the Pentagon's failure to find the man despite "communicating regularly with extraterrestrial beings."

Greenewald began investigating the US government's UFO research when he was only 15 years old.

Describing his diligent efforts to Motherboard on Monday, he said he had filed countless Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to unseal the records.

"About 20 years ago, I had been fighting for years to get additional UFO records released from the CIA," said Greenewald.

Black Vault founder John Greenewald Jr. (pictured) has been suing the CIA for the past two decades to publish the records and then scan the pages one by one

Black Vault founder John Greenewald Jr. (pictured) has been suing the CIA for the past two decades to publish the records and then scan the pages one by one

& # 39; It was like pulling teeth. I went around with them to try and eventually get it.

"I received a large box with a few thousand pages and I had to scan one side at a time."

The dossier includes both the records Greenewald requested and others that the CIA has already publicly released and compiled into a CD that Black Vault bought last year.

In a blog post, Greenewald noted that while the CIA claims to have released all UAP documents, there is no way to verify whether some documents may have been withheld.

In a Twitter thread on Tuesday, he stated that the records available on the CIA website are incomplete, even though the agency "creates the illusion" that everything is there.

He posted screenshots of a CIA site search that returned 415 results for UFO-related FOIA queries – compared to the 713 files in the Black Vault.

In a Twitter thread Tuesday, Greenewald explained how incomplete the records available on the CIA website are, even though the agency "creates the illusion" that everything is there

In a Twitter thread Tuesday, Greenewald explained how incomplete the records available on the CIA website are, even though the agency "creates the illusion" that everything is there

Greenewald also emphasized how the CIA publishes its records in a format that is far from user-friendly.

"The CIA has made it incredibly difficult to use their records properly," Greenewald told Motherboard.

& # 39; They offer a format that is very out of date (multi-page .tif) and text file outputs that are largely unusable and that I believe should be used as a "search tool".

“In my opinion, this outdated format makes it very difficult for people to see the documents and use them for research purposes.

"Researchers and the curious prefer simplicity and accessibility when looking at data dumps like this."

Despite the inconvenience, Greenewald said thousands of people downloaded the archive the very first day it was posted on the Black Vault.

He offers the archive for free, but sets up a Patreon account for anyone who wishes to donate money to support his past and future efforts to uncover CIA records.

"Plain and simple, the public has a right to know," said Greenewald.

“When I started research almost 25 years ago at the age of 15, I knew that this topic had something to offer. Not because of viral internet hoaxes. Not because of back door meetings I can't tell you who, but I promise it was amazing information. No, none of that.

“It was just because of the evidence I got straight from the CIA. And the NSA. And the air force. And the DIA. I feel like I'm achieving what I set out to do. Easy access to relevant material so people can see for themselves what is going on. & # 39;

Greenewald did not immediately return DailyMail.com's requests for comments.

Greenewald (pictured) began investigating the US government's UFO research in 1996 at the age of 15. Its Black Vault database is the result of nearly 10,000 different requests from the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Greenewald (pictured) began investigating the US government's UFO research in 1996 at the age of 15. Its Black Vault database is the result of nearly 10,000 different requests from the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

UFO detectives like Greenewald may soon have more information to sift through as U.S. intelligence is about to submit an unclassified report on unidentified aerial phenomena to the intelligence and armed forces committees of Congress.

The director of the National Intelligence Service and Defense Ministers have just under six months to do so after a provision in the "Committee's Comment" section of the Fiscal Year 2021 Intelligence Authorization Act was included in the massive bill, according to CNN.

The Senate Intelligence Committee policy was that the report should not be classified, but may have a classified appendix. Therefore, the discovery of extraterrestrial life is unlikely to reach Earth.

However, it says the report must include a detailed analysis of the UFO data and information gathered by the Office of Naval Intelligence, the Task Force on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, and the FBI.

It must include a detail of an “Interagent process to ensure timely data collection and centralized analysis of all unidentified aerial phenomena reported to the federal government” and an officer responsible for this process should be named.

A spokesman for the Office of the Director of the National Intelligence Service confirmed the request for the report to be sent to the Snopes website for fact-checking.

Navy pilots believe they discovered a UFO off the coast in Jacksonville in 2015 (picture)

Navy pilots believe they discovered a UFO off the coast in Jacksonville in 2015 (picture)

In April last year, the Pentagon released three short videos – one from 2004 and two from 2015 – showing "unidentified aerial phenomena" previously confirmed as real by the US Navy.

The videos recorded by infrared cameras showed apparently unknown objects in flight, moving quickly across the sky.

Service members can be heard in the background of two of the videos, reacting as they look at the objects. One speculates that it could be a drone.

In August the Pentagon announced that it would set up a task force to investigate the objects. However, it is still unclear what the objects are or where they come from.

Pentagon officials and members of Congress alike were concerned about the appearance of unidentified objects flying over US military bases. Some suspect that the objects in the video could be drones collecting information.

Last June, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted for the Pentagon and the intelligence community to publicly analyze such encounters.

This is not the first time the Pentagon has investigated encounters with UFOs from the air, having previously investigated recordings of such incidents as part of a secret program initiated by former Senator Harry Reid and has since been discontinued.

This program started in 2007 and completed in 2012, the Pentagon says, after deciding that there are higher priority areas that require funding.

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