ENTERTAINMENT

The Church of England supported predators in its ranks more than its victims


The Church of England "failed" to protect children and youth from sexual predators in their ranks while a culture of secrecy allowed abusers to hide, according to a damn report released today.

The independent Child Sexual Abuse Survey (IICSA) found that nearly 400 people who were clergy or trusted Church affiliates were convicted of sex offenses against children from the 1940s through 2018.

In the past year, 2,504 safety concerns about children and vulnerable adults and 449 concerns about recent child sexual abuse were reported to dioceses.

However, research into whether both the Church of England and the Church in Wales have historically protected children from sexual abuse found that both institutions failed to take reports of abuse seriously for nearly eight decades.

His report found that "many allegations were kept internally by the Church instead of being immediately reported to outside authorities".

The responses to the sexual abuse disclosure "showed neither the necessary urgency nor an assessment of the gravity of the allegations," the report said.

It found that “recent sexual abuse allegations” were not “overlooked” because “it was not understood that the passage of time had not eliminated the risk posed by the perpetrator, and because the lifelong effects of the abuse on the victim were not understood. & # 39;

Meanwhile, suspected perpetrators received more support than victims of sexual abuse, while those who reported the abuse became “actively disbelievers” by the Church.

Citing the case of former Bishop Peter Ball, the investigation suggests that ex-The Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord George Carey, "simply could not believe the allegations against Ball or acknowledge their seriousness, regardless of evidence".

The report adds that Carey "was open to his bishop" and "apparently wanted the whole business to go away".

The investigation was conducted in 2015, according to a complainant named "Nick" of a murderous pedophile ring in and around Westminster.

Nick, real name Carl Beech, was later discredited and imprisoned for 18 years for a judge calling his "cruel and callous" lies.

The IICSA also found:

  • Church "neglected the well-being of children in order to protect their reputation";
  • A culture of secrecy and "respect for the Church" enabled sexual predators to hide.
  • There was "disproportionate loyalty" to members of the Church, which meant that individual priests refused to convict or investigate alleged perpetrators.
  • Church members "naively" considered the sexual abuse of children by priests to be "improbable or impossible" because of their religious beliefs and "moral code".
  • The "moral authority of the church has been widely regarded as unreproachable";
  • The Church's failure to respond to alleged sexual abuse contributed to the trauma of the victims.
  • A significant number of criminals in the Church involved downloading child pornography.

The Church of England "failed" to protect children from sexual predators in its ranks, while a culture of secrecy allowed abusers to hide. One damn report made claims (stocks).

The investigation looked at the case of Victor Whitsey, who was Bishop of Chester between 1974 and 1982. Thirteen people have complained to the Cheshire Constabulary of sexual abuse by Whitsey, and the Church is aware of six other complainants. The allegations included sexual assault of teenage boys and girls while receiving pastoral assistance. He died in 1987

Among the sexual abuse cases that have recently troubled the Church include former Bishop Peter Ball, who was jailed for 32 months in 2015 for sexually abusing boys that was carried out over three decades

The investigation looked at the case of Victor Whitsey (left), who was Bishop of Chester between 1974 and 1982. Thirteen people have complained to the Cheshire Constabulary of sexual abuse by Whitsey, and the Church is aware of six other complainants. He died in 1987. Among the cases of sexual abuse that recently troubled the Church was former Bishop Peter Ball (right), who was jailed for 32 months in 2015 for over three decades of sexual abuse against boys

The report highlights the excessive attention paid to the alleged sexual abuse perpetrator as opposed to that of the victim. For example, it is noted that former dean of Manchester Cathedral, Robert Waddington, has been the subject of a number of allegations of child sexual abuse over many years.

Nonetheless, his age and weakness allowed his permission to continue to serve, "apparently without considering the risks to the children with whom he came into contact".

Timothy Storey, a youth leader in the Diocese of London from 2002 to 2007, used his role to care for teenage girls. He is serving 15 years in prison for several offenses against children

Timothy Storey, a youth leader in the Diocese of London from 2002 to 2007, used his role to care for teenage girls. He is serving 15 years in prison for several offenses against children

The investigation found that "a significant number of violations involved downloading or holding indecent pictures of children".

His report examined a number of cases involving both convicted and alleged perpetrators. "Many of these showed that the church has failed to take disclosures by or about children seriously or to report allegations to the legal authorities."

This included Timothy Storey, a youth leader in the Diocese of London from 2002 to 2007, who used his role in caring for teenage girls.

Storey is currently serving 15 years in prison for multiple offenses against children, including rape. Years before his conviction, he had admitted sexual activity with a teenage boy with diocesan workers, but refused to coercion.

The investigation also looked into the case of Victor Whitsey, who was Bishop of Chester between 1974 and 1982. Thirteen people have complained to the Cheshire Constabulary of sexual abuse by Whitsey, and the Church is aware of six other complainants.

The allegations included sexual assault against boys and girls while receiving pastoral assistance. He died in 1987.

Another important case examined by the investigation was Reverend Trevor Devamanikkam, who was a priest until 1996. In 1984 and 1985 he allegedly raped and indecently assaulted a teenager, Matthew Ineson, several times in his home.

Among the sexual abuse cases that have recently troubled the Church include former Bishop Peter Ball, who was jailed for 32 months in 2015 for sexually abusing boys that was carried out over three decades

Among the sexual abuse cases that have recently troubled the Church include former Bishop Peter Ball, who was jailed for 32 months in 2015 for sexually abusing boys that was carried out over three decades

Investigator Professor Alexis Jay said, "For many decades the Church has failed to protect children and adolescents from sexual abuse and has created a culture where perpetrators can hide and victims encounter barriers to disclosure that many have not been able to overcome."

Investigator Professor Alexis Jay said, "For many decades the Church has failed to protect children and adolescents from sexual abuse and has created a culture where perpetrators can hide and victims encounter barriers to disclosure that many have not been able to overcome."

As of 2012, Reverend Matthew Ineson has provided the Church with a number of claims and has complained about the Church's response. Devamanikkam was charged in 2017 and committed suicide the day before he appeared in court.

Victims received little or no pastoral support or advice, while their perpetrators received assistance from those in senior positions of authority.

"Bishops have too much power and too little accountability": Advocates for 20 victims of child sexual abuse in the Council of Europe call for a "big change" in protection as "damn report" finds the Church has failed to protect children from sexual predators

Lawyers representing 20 child sexual abuse survivors in the Church of England have beaten religious authorities for "failing victims".

Richard Scorer, Slater and Gordon's lead attorney on the investigation, said "Bishops have too much power and too little accountability".

He called for "major changes" including "adequate support for survivors and the removal of the bishops' operational responsibility for protection".

Mr Scorer told MailOnline: 'This is a very damn report. It affirms that despite decades of scandals and endless promises, the Church of England continues to fail victims and survivors. Bishops have too much power and too little accountability.

& # 39; National guidelines are not properly enforced. Sexual abuse by clergy continues to be minimized. The report indicates that major changes are still needed, including adequate support for survivors and the lifting of the bishops' operational responsibility for protection.

“To bring about change we also need reporting and independent oversight over the protection of the church. It is imperative that IICSA recommends this in its final report next year. & # 39;

Until 2015, the Church did not adequately fund protection, and advice from protection staff was often overlooked or ignored in order to protect the Church's reputation.

According to the research, the "culture" of the church – including the widespread "respect for the authority of the church and individual priests" – contributed to "becoming a place where perpetrators could hide".

When examining the investigative report on the behavior of pedophile Ball, the former Bishop of Lewes and Gloucester, who was convicted in 2015, the investigation highlighted five problem areas: clericalism, tribalism, naivety, prestige and sexuality.

The report states: “Power was mainly with the clergy, with no accountability to any outside or independent body or to any individual. There was a culture of clericalism in which the moral authority of the clergy was widely perceived as unprovoked.

"They benefited from suspensive treatment so that their behavior would not be questioned and some children and vulnerable adults could abuse."

The study on tribalism states: “Within the church there was a disproportionate loyalty to members of one's own“ tribe ”. This inappropriately extended to safeguarding the practice with protecting some individuals accused of child sexual abuse.

"The perpetrators were defended by their peers who also tried to reintegrate them into church life without regard for the welfare or protection of children."

The report accused members of the Church of naivete, suggesting that "there was and still is a view among some parishioners and clergy that their religious practices and adherence to a moral code made child sexual abuse very unlikely".

It has been argued that the "primary concern" of many high-ranking clergymen is "to uphold the reputation of the Church, which has priority over victims and survivors".

“Older clergymen often refused to report allegations to the legal authorities, preferring to keep the accused internally administered for as long as possible. This hampered criminal investigations and allowed some abusers to escape justice, ”the report said.

It is even said that there was a "culture of fear and secrecy" about sexuality, with some members of the Church "mistakenly associating homosexuality with child sexual abuse."

The report adds: “There was a lack of transparency, open dialogue and openness regarding sexual matters, along with a clumsiness in investigating such matters. This made it difficult to challenge sexual behavior. & # 39;

The research suggests that all of this often resulted in “totally inappropriate” responses to authentic or suspected cases of child sexual abuse.

The case cited is the case of Bishop Peter Forster, who told a hearing that the convicted pedophile Reverend Ian Hughes "was misled into viewing child pornography". More than 800 of the 8,000 naughty images Hughes downloaded were classified as the most serious.

The IICSA report states: “The culture of the Church of England made it possible to become a place where perpetrators could hide. Respect for the authority of the Church and individual priests, taboos on the discussion of sexuality, and an environment in which alleged perpetrators were treated more supportively than victims, presented barriers to disclosure that many victims could not overcome.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby

Archbishop of York Stephen Cottrell

The Archbishops of York (right) and Canterbury (left) apologized fiercely for “shameful failure” to respond to allegations of child sexual abuse prior to the report's release

Another aspect of ecclesiastical culture was clericalism, which meant that the moral authority of the clergy was widely perceived as unreproachable.

“As we have said in other reports, faith organizations like the Church of England are distinguished by their explicit moral purpose to teach right from wrong.

"We really apologize for our shameful mistakes": Archbishops of Canterbury and York's open letter in full

The independent Child Sexual Abuse Inquiry, IICSA, is due to release its overall investigative report on the Church of England (and the Church in Wales) on Tuesday October 6th.

For the survivors, this will remind them of the abuse they have suffered and our failure to respond well. It will be a very harrowing time for her. Some have bravely told their story at IICSA hearings or other forums. For others, this report will be a reminder of the abuse they never spoke openly about. We are genuinely sorry for the shameful way the Church has acted, and we declare our obligation to listen, learn, and respond to the results of the report. We cannot and will not make excuses and we can again sincerely and heartily apologize to the abused and to their families, friends and colleagues.

We as the Church of England are ready to support anyone who comes forward. We have to live up to our commitment to change. Survivors have told us that words are meaningless without action; We take action, but we are also aware that what we did was neither soon enough nor enough.

Please pray for all who will be affected by the release of the report on Tuesday and that we as a church will be able to respond with humility and a shared determination to change. We need to listen carefully and reflect honestly on everything the report says and continue to drive changes toward a safer church for all.

As of this writing, we know the report is based on the July 2019 trial, which examined the Church of England and Church in Wales response to allegations of child sexual abuse, as well as the appropriateness of current safeguards and practices Methods exercises. The report will also focus on common themes and issues identified in the overall inquiry, including the case studies on Bishop Peter Ball and the Diocese of Chichester, both held in 2018. The report identifies defects that we are already working on changing, as well as defects that we will have to work harder to change. There will no doubt be strong recommendations, and we welcome that. We are fully committed to taking steps to make the Church a safe place for all and to address survivors' needs for support and reparation.

Protection means cherishing everyone as someone who was created in God's image. It's preventing harm and promoting well-being. It is about responding compassionately to victims and survivors, addressing justice issues relating to survivors, other complainants, respondents and anyone else affected, and helping them rebuild their lives. Protection is fundamental to our beliefs. Regardless of our role in the life of the Church, protection is the responsibility of each and every one of us, guided and advised by our protection professionals. Church leaders have a special responsibility to work together to bring about the change in culture and practice that we need to see that have been just too slow.

In the context of child sexual abuse, the Church's neglect of the physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being of children and youth in order to protect their reputations has been at odds with its mission to love and care for the innocent and vulnerable. & # 39;

The Church's failure to respond consistently to victims and survivors of child sexual abuse often contributed to the trauma of the victims, which Archbishop Justin Welby described as "deeply and deeply shocking."

Meanwhile, the investigation found that the Church in Wales has never had an external audit program – meaning its protection practices have not been independently audited. The report highlights record keeping as a major problem for the Church.

Attitudes toward forgiveness are also taken into account in the report, noting that many members of the Church see this as an appropriate response to admission of wrongdoing.

The research made eight recommendations, covering areas such as clergy discipline, information sharing, and support for victims and survivors.

Professor Alexis Jay, chairman of the investigation, said: “For many decades the Church of England has not protected children and young people from sexual abuse and has instead facilitated a culture in which the perpetrators could hide and the victims encountered disclosure barriers that many could not overcome.

There were simply not enough security officers in the Church in Wales to do the amount of work they asked for. It has been found that records are almost non-existent and do little to help understand previous protection issues.

“To ensure that the right measures are taken in the future, it is important that the protection of children from heinous sexual abuse is continuously strengthened.

“If real and lasting change is to be made, it is important that the Church improve responses to allegations made by victims and survivors and provide adequate support to those victims over time.

"The panel and I hope that this report and its recommendations support these changes to ensure these errors never recur."

Lawyers representing 20 child sexual abuse survivors have beaten religious authorities for “failing victims”.

Richard Scorer, Slater and Gordon's lead attorney on the investigation, said "Bishops have too much power and too little accountability".

He called for "major changes" including "adequate support for survivors and the removal of the bishops' operational responsibility for protection".

Mr Scorer told MailOnline: 'This is a very damn report. It affirms that despite decades of scandals and endless promises, the Church of England continues to fail victims and survivors. Bishops have too much power and too little accountability.

& # 39; National guidelines are not properly enforced. Sexual abuse by clergy continues to be minimized. The report indicates that major changes are still needed, including adequate support for survivors and the lifting of the bishops' operational responsibility for protection.

“To bring about change we also need reporting and independent oversight over the protection of the church. It is imperative that IICSA recommends this in its final report next year. & # 39;

The Archbishops of York and Canterbury apologized fiercely for the "shameful mistakes" made against allegations of child sexual abuse prior to the report's release today.

In their open letter, Justin Welby and Stephen Cottrell said, “For survivors, this will remind them of the abuse they have suffered and our failure to respond well. It will be a very harrowing time for her. Some have bravely told their story at IICSA hearings or other forums. For others, this report will be a reminder of the abuse they never spoke openly about.

“We are truly sorry for the shameful way the Church has acted, and we pledge to listen, learn, and respond to the results of the report.

We cannot and will not make excuses and we can again sincerely and heartily apologize to the abused and their families.

In September the Church of England set up a multi-million pound compensation fund to direct money to victims of historical sex abuse by bishops, clergymen and lay church workers.

The "Preliminary Pilot Support Program" will make the first payouts from a compensation process that is expected to cost the Church £ 200 million.

The fund was approved by the Cabinet of the Church, which also stated that in the future it would invite external authorities to conduct independent investigations into allegations against church figures.

Officials declined to disclose the size of the new fund, but Church documents earlier this year said the final bill was expected to be £ 200 million.

"Portraits of Predators": How three CoE members abused their positions and committed child sexual abuse – while their victims were disappointed by "failures" of the church.

Victor Whitsey: Bishop of Hertford accused of sexually assaulting 19 victims who had reputations for generally acting strange.

Victor Whitsey was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Blackburn in 1949. Between 1955 and 1968 he was a priest in the Diocese of Manchester and the Diocese of Blackburn.

Victor Whitsey was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Blackburn in 1949. Between 1955 and 1968 he was a priest in the Diocese of Manchester and the Diocese of Blackburn

Victor Whitsey was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Blackburn in 1949. Between 1955 and 1968 he was a priest in the Diocese of Manchester and the Diocese of Blackburn

He was named Suffragan Bishop of Hertford in the Diocese of St. Albans in 1971 and Bishop of Chester in 1974, a position he held until his retirement in early 1982. He served in the Diocese of Blackburn until his death in 1987.

In January 2016, a grown man announced to a pastor that he had been indecently assaulted by Whitsey as a child in the early 1980s. The Diocesan Protection Advisor (DSA) was informed immediately.

In addition to offering pastoral assistance to the complainant, she alerted the Bishop of Chester, Peter Forster (who said he had "little more to do with the matter") and referred the case to the National Safeguarding Team.

The complainant also stated that in 2002 he had reported his abuse to Bishop Forster. He was offered counseling but no further action was taken.

Bishop Forster had "a vague memory of someone … who said Victor Whitsey put his arm around him". He said this was "not registered at the time" because Whitsey "had a reputation for strange behavior in general".

Bishop Forster has not made any written records or done any additional research. This contradicted the Church of England's Child Protection Policy (1999) that the recipient of an abuse allegation "must keep a detailed record of their responses," including "the content of all conversations … any decisions made and the reasons for them".

In July 2016, the DSA received information from two other men who claimed Whitsey sexually abused them as children between 1974 and 1981.

She informed the Cheshire Constabulary, which opened an investigation – Operation Coverage. It focused on incidents between 1974 and 1982 during Whitsey's tenure as Bishop of Chester. Another 10 potential victims were identified, including teenagers and young adults of both sexes.

Police investigations found that "it was clear that those who reported abuse had previously provided the Church with details of their allegations." In October 2017, the Cheshire Constabulary concluded that there was enough alive evidence to question Whitsey on 10 allegations.

By our third hearing in July 2019, a total of 19 people had announced that they had been sexually abused by Whitsey.

Timothy Storey: Youth worker imprisoned for rape in the Diocese of London, who received counseling from the Council of Europe during his conviction

Between 2002 and 2007 Timothy Storey worked as a youth and child laborer in the Diocese of London. He also served as a youth leader for a mission organization. In September 2007 he began an ordinand training at a theological college in Oxford with the sponsorship of the diocese.

A senior missionary organization leader received four reports of sexual abuse against Storey between 2007 and 2009.

They were made by girls and young women between the ages of 13 and 19 who Storey was known for his youth work and leadership in the Church.

In February 2009, the high-ranking head of the mission organization informed the Diocese of London of the allegations of abuse.

Reverend Jeremy Crossley, director of ordinands in the Two City Region, met with Storey in March 2009 to seek his response.

Timothy Storey, a youth leader in the Diocese of London from 2002 to 2007, used his role to care for teenage girls. He is serving 15 years in prison for several offenses against children

Timothy Storey, a youth leader in the Diocese of London from 2002 to 2007, used his role to care for teenage girls. He is serving 15 years in prison for several offenses against children

This meeting contradicted the Church's policy of the time (Protecting All God & # 39; s Children, 2004) that a member of the Church "should never speak directly to the person alleged against".

During the meeting, Storey admitted the Reverend Crossley that he had sexual intercourse with a 16-year-old girl whom he met through a Christian residential event he was attending in a leadership position.

According to Church policy, this information should have been reported immediately to the police and social services.

After meeting Storey, Reverend Crossley told Reverend Hugh Valentine, the bishop's adviser on child protection, that Storey "is basically a good man who can be an effective priest".

The matter was referred to the local authority designated officer (LADO) who said it was not a living matter for them.

The Reverend Valentine then concluded that he did not view the circumstances as a "child protection issue". A subsequent review found this "was extremely short-sighted … it does not take into account the risk Storey may have taken for anyone under his control who was under the age of 18".

Later in March 2009, the Reverend Valentine raised the matter with police, but on an informal telephone basis.

The police did not take any further action because the girl was 16 years old at the time. "However, if a reference to coercion had been mentioned, the advice might have been very different."

Police were not informed of the full history of the allegations against Storey or that emails received by the Diocese of London, including the Reverend Valentine, indicated that the applicants were being viewed as coercion there.

A subsequent review revealed that this interview was a "missed opportunity" for the diocese as the police "did not have all the information available that they should have needed for a proper assessment". Police believed that Storey did not abuse a trust because he was a volunteer and therefore did not meet the “strict legal criteria” required to prove the crime.

After Storey was convicted of caregiver abuse in 2014, continued contact with a number of victims resulted in a review of the diocese's case files. As a result, the London DSA contacted the police.

In February 2016, Storey was convicted of three rape offenses and one criminal offense for penetration. These crimes occurred in 2008 and 2009 and concerned two of the female victims (aged 16 and 17) who had contact with the diocese. Storey was sentenced to 15 years in prison.

In delivering the verdict, the judge heavily criticized the Diocese of London for its "utterly incompetent" handling of the case and the "widespread failure of those responsible at the time to understand whose interests they should have protected".

Storey was constantly cared for and supervised by the Church, while some of his victims "did not feel like they were believed and felt alone" without support.

The diocese commissioned two independent reviews of the Storey case regarding the handling of the victims' original statements.

Both reports identified a number of shortcomings in the diocese's response between 2009 and 2014, including failure to implement policies and procedures in force at the time.

Another review in 2019 by the independent chairman of the Diocesan Security Steering Group of Diocese of London reiterated the shortcomings of the diocese. It was also noted that top leadership within the Diocese of London should have taken responsibility for the shortcomings in this case, rather than allowing Reverends Crossley and Valentine to be the focus of public "criticism".

Reverend Trevor Devamanikkam: Priest from Ripon and Leeds who killed himself for molestation the day before he appeared in court

Trevor Devamanikkam was ordained a priest in 1977 in the Diocese of Ripon and Leeds. In March 1984 he moved to a parish in the Diocese of Bradford, where he stayed until 1985. Devamanikkam retired in 1996 but was permitted to serve in the Lincoln Diocese between 2002 and 2009.

Reverend Matthew Ineson is an ordained priest in the Church of England. He struggled with his parents during his teenage years and moved in with his grandparents.

His family was religious and attended church regularly. Matthew Ineson was a member of the church choir and altar server. While his grandparents were fighting, a local priest organized a break with the Reverend Devamanikkam.

In 1984, at the age of 16, Matthew Ineson was living with Devamanikkam and his housekeeper. On his second night, Devamanikkam came into Matthew Ineson's bedroom, put his hand under the covers, and played with his penis.

When asked if he liked it, Matthew Ineson said no. This lasted two or three nights and then went on to Devamanikkam to tell Matthew Ineson to share his bed with him. Devamanikkam made it clear that if he did not, he would be kicked out of the rectory with nowhere to go.

While sharing a bed for several weeks, Devamanikkam raped Matthew Ineson at least 12 times, and also sexually assaulted him.

After about two months, Matthew Ineson's grandmother came to the rectory and spoke to Devamanikkam. Matthew Ineson was not part of that conversation and his grandmother left without speaking to him.

The next day, Matthew Ineson said the Bishop of Bradford had visited the rectory and told him to go. He said, "It is not my problem where you go, but you have to go here." No reason was given.

Bishop Roy Williamson (who was then Bishop of Bradford) told us that there was "unrest over the agreement" between Matthew Ineson and Devamanikkam, but he did not remember visiting the rectory.

A licensed deacon at Devamanikkam's Church (who was doing a detailed report on Devamanikkam's mental health at the time) said it was then Archdeacon of Bradford (David Shreeve) who had visited the rectory. There was no written record of this visit.

Reverend Ineson joined the police in 2013 and then in 2015. In 2017, police investigated and accused Devamanikkam. Devamanikkam committed suicide in June 2017, the day before he appeared in court, between March 1984 and April 1985 for three buggery and three indecent assault cases, all relating to the Reverend Ineson.

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