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The British say the deadline for switching to electric cars by 2035 is too early


A number of new research has found that the British are unwilling to switch to an electric vehicle if the government plans to ban sales of new gasoline and diesel cars.

A nationwide survey of the UK car dealership found that 44 percent of motorists do not believe they are ready to drive a battery vehicle by 2035. Many of them say that they cannot imagine ever owning one.

In another study, the British were asked to state their performance requirements for an electric car before considering buying one. A separate report, focusing on the country's charging infrastructure, found that the UK is only pledging five percent of its target number of public devices for the end of the decade.

Industry insiders have now urged the government to increase incentives for drivers to buy electric cars and to postpone the current 2040 deadline, although Transport Secretary Grant Shapps is reportedly considering bringing it forward as early as 2030.

Are you ready to make the switch? A survey by the SMMT found that more than two in five drivers don't believe they're ready to drive a battery-powered vehicle by 2035. A quarter said they could never imagine owning an electric car in their lifetime

A quarter of drivers never want to own an electric car, according to a British survey

There is no doubt that the demand for all-electric cars is increasing. The SMMT's monthly admissions report shows that sales in 2020 were up 175 percent year over year. Tesla's Model 3 was the best-selling new car in April and May as the Covid-19 pandemic didn't satisfy the appetite for battery-powered vehicles.

Much of this is the result of a massive industrial investment valued at around £ 54 billion in 2019 alone, and the choice of plug-in models is growing dramatically.

In the past 12 months, the number of plug-in hybrids and fully electric vehicles sold in the UK has grown from 62 to 83, including the arrival of the first Volkswagen ID.3 hatchbacks, which landed on UK soil this week.

Despite the growing availability and greater choice of engines, a survey commissioned by the SMMT found that almost half of drivers are not only not prepared to switch to zero-emission driving now, but they also don't assume it will be in 2035 Will be the case – five years before the existing deadline for the ban on new gasoline, diesel and hybrid cars.

The survey found that just over a third (37 percent) are “optimistic” about buying a fully electric vehicle by 2025 – about 15 years earlier than the ban is supposed to be enforced.

But a lot more people are concerned that battery cars are not for them. 44 percent say they won't be ready to make the switch by 2035.

A quarter (24 percent) of the 2,185 drivers surveyed said that despite the obstructive ban in 2040, they do not expect to ever buy an electric car in their life.

The SMMT said it was imperative that the government increase the availability of incentives to encourage motorists to ditch their gasoline and diesel cars in favor of cleaner electric vehicles - otherwise the nation will fail to meet its pollution reduction goals

The SMMT said it was imperative that the government increase the availability of incentives to encourage motorists to ditch their gasoline and diesel cars in favor of cleaner electric vehicles – otherwise the nation will fail to meet its pollution reduction goals

The newest electric car in the UK is the Volkswagen ID.3. The first model in the German brand's electric ID range hit the British shores this week

The first 1st edition versions of the ID.3 arrived on Tuesday from the manufacturer's Zwickau plant in Grimsby Port and will be delivered to customers by the end of the month

The newest electric car in the UK is the Volkswagen ID.3. The first model in the German brand's electric ID range hit the British shores this week. The first "1st Edition" versions arrived on Tuesday from the manufacturer's Zwickau plant in Grimsby Port and will be delivered to customers by the end of the month

And that deadline – which has not yet been stamped – could be shortened by another five years after a government consultation that ended in August.

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps, who owns a Tesla but is getting out of a Land Rover SUV here, is considering shortening the gasoline and diesel car sales ban for 2040

Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps, who owns a Tesla but is getting out of a Land Rover SUV here, is considering shortening the gasoline and diesel car sales ban for 2040

Many Tory MPs are putting pressure on ministers to phase out polluting vehicles and accelerate the switch to electric cars.

The government is expected to release its agreed date to end internal combustion engine car sales this month and is seriously considering approving the 2035 deadline, The Times reported last week.

The Climate Change Committee – the government's independent advisory body – has already asked ministers to adopt an even earlier target for 2030. A demand was backed by more than 100 Tory MPs earlier this month as part of a plan to "rebuild greener" after the pandemic.

Banning the sale of new gasoline and diesel cars over the next decade would align the UK with countries like Ireland, the Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden, whose goal is 2030.

Transport Minister Grant Shapps, who owns a Tesla, previously spoke of a possible deadline for 2032.

The SMMT survey found that consumers are very interested in electric vehicles. Drivers are most attracted to the lower running costs (41 percent) and the positive impact on the environment (29 percent).

However, the survey found that there are still significant hurdles for shoppers, including higher purchase prices (52 percent), lack of local charging stations (44 percent), and the fear of not getting caught on longer trips (38 percent).

The trade organization says many of these concerns "can be overcome with the right strategy" and urged the government to commit to long-term incentives to encourage drivers to buy cleaner vehicles.

Electric cars are allowed to display these special license plates with green flashes in 2020. Ministers say they will improve the profile of battery-powered cars

Electric cars are allowed to display these special license plates with green flashes in 2020. Ministers say they will improve the profile of battery-powered cars

It has also been suggested that the license plates, which are only available on zero-emission, all-electric models, could pave the way for future incentive systems that could allow them to use bus lanes and park for free in city centers

It has also been suggested that the license plates, which are only available on zero-emission, all-electric models, could pave the way for future incentive systems that could allow them to use bus lanes and park for free in city centers

From autumn this year, ministers have allowed electric cars to have special license plates with green flashes to indicate that they are emission-free. This could pave the way for future benefits such as: B. free parking in cities and city centers as well as access to bus lanes – although no such incentives have yet to be confirmed.

This includes the continuation of the £ 3,000 Plug-in Grant and its reintroduction for plug-in hybrids, which was removed back in October 2018.

The seven-point recommendation of the SMMT to facilitate the switch to electric vehicles

1. The government should encourage adoption through incentives, including grants for all zero-emission vehicles and tax breaks that have been in place for at least six years.

2. A national strategic plan presented on site to increase the number of charging points and ensure the right chargers are in the right places.

3. Support the local authorities with guidelines on building permits and technical standards as well as the obligation to comply with national standards.

4th A cross-sector strategy and roadmap with goals for incentives, infrastructure and energy, as well as positive consumer messages on all technology decisions.

5. All public charging points must be available to all users, including fast and ultra-fast types with credit / debit card access and / or network roaming.

6th Progress needs to be reviewed on a regular basis, with key metrics reported annually to be tracked against the plan.

7th A bold strategy to support the UK industrial transition, maintain, grow and transform UK auto manufacturing, and attract new investment, including workforce skills, the battery giant factory, supply chain development and strategic R&D investments globally competitive level.

The PiCG is also only suitable for buyers of electric models with a list price less than £ 40,000, eliminating many battery cars, not to mention almost the entire Tesla range of vehicles.

These grants, available in varying amounts since 2011, will have paid out more than £ 1.7 billion towards the purchase of electric cars by the end of 2023, according to statistics.

However, the SMMT says there should be more incentives.

This includes VAT exemptions for all zero-emission cars, which in turn could lower the up-front price of an electric family car by an average of £ 5,500 and better align them with gasoline and diesel equivalents to attract buyers.

Mike Hawes, General Manager of the Trade Organization, The automakers cannot change the market on their own and need the support of the cabinet.

"To give consumers the confidence to take the plunge into these technologies, government and other sectors need to increase and match manufacturers' commitment by investing in the incentives and infrastructure needed to power our electric future." he said in a statement this morning.

“Manufacturers are working hard to make zero and ultra-low emissions the norm and are pledging to work with the government to accelerate the move to net zero – but obstacles remain.

"Until these vehicles are as affordable to buy and as easy to own and use as conventional cars, we risk the UK being on the slow lane, undermining industry investment and stifling progress," he added.

Drivers state their performance requirements if they want to switch to electric motors

What do drivers need to want to buy an electric car? That's the question Castrol oil company asked 10,000 consumers, fleet managers and automotive leaders across the UK.

They said that for UK consumers, on average, a price tag of £ 24,000, a charge time of 30 minutes and a range of 282 miles on a full battery are the "turning points" for mainstream electric vehicle adoption.

If these requirements are met, the study estimates that the UK's annual electric vehicle market could be worth £ 13 billion by 2025.

Omer Dormen, Vice President at Castrol Europe, said these three turning points should be used by the automotive industry as a "clear roadmap" to accelerate the general adoption of electric cars.

"Castrol's research shows that individual consumers are positive about the switch to electricity, but buyers in the UK expect it a little later than other markets and want to pay a little less," he said.

"As an industry, we need to focus on the factors that matter most to consumers."

A poll of 10,000 Brits found three turning points after which more drivers will have to switch to electric cars. This includes a price tag of £ 24,000 and a driving range of 282 miles

A poll of 10,000 Brits found three turning points after which more drivers will have to switch to electric cars. This includes a price tag of £ 24,000 and a driving range of 282 miles

The consumers, fleet managers and automotive industry leaders surveyed by Castrol said they would only switch to an electric car if they could all be charged in half an hour

The consumers, fleet managers and automotive industry leaders surveyed by Castrol said they would only switch to an electric car if they could all be charged in half an hour

In July insurer Direct Line said the average lifetime running cost – including the purchase price – for an electric car is £ 52,133, while an equivalent gasoline model is £ 53,625.

On average, an EV would cost the owner £ 3,752 a year over its lifetime, compared to £ 3,858 for a gasoline car, resulting in an annual saving of £ 107.

The insurer has calculated that the average annual running cost for an electric car is £ 1,742 or £ 33.50 per week, which is 21 percent cheaper than running a gasoline car at £ 2,205 per year or £ 42.40 per week.

Mandhir Singh, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Castrol, stated, "Lowering the cost and charging time of electric vehicles while increasing range, infrastructure and vehicle choice will be critical to making consumers switch."

"Older people are less likely to buy an electric vehicle," says AA

Research by the AA found that 47 percent of drivers would consider buying an electric vehicle the next time they change their car, according to a survey of 17,628 drivers conducted in February this year.

It found that women are 49 percent more likely to get one when they say they consider an electric car than 46 percent of men.

In terms of age groups, only 43 percent of respondents aged 65 and over said they would consider an electric car the next time they change their engine.

This is less than in all other age groups: 60 percent of 18 to 24 year olds say they are likely, 56 percent of 35 to 44 year olds agree and 48 percent of 55 to 64 year olds say that they would consider buying.

Meanwhile, 56 percent of respondents living in London would likely consider buying an electric car as their next vehicle, making it the most likely region to buy.

Edmund King, AA President, said: & # 39; The automotive world is undergoing radical change, with more changes likely in the next decade than in the last hundred years. We need to help drivers break down perceived myths about electric vehicles and charging.

& # 39; It's incredibly encouraging that almost half of drivers will be considering an electric vehicle for their next car. Our AA breakdown data also shows that EVs are more reliable, but when breakdowns do occur, they are similar to breakdowns in traditional cars with tires, wheels, and the 12 volt battery accounting for about a third of the problems. & # 39;

Both the SMMT and the International Council on Clean Transportation have stated that the UK is currently falling far short of its goal of improving public charging infrastructure (Photo: charging station for electric cars near Crouch End on Londoner Strasse).

Both the SMMT and the International Council on Clean Transportation have stated that the UK is currently falling far short of its goal of improving public charging infrastructure (Photo: charging station for electric cars near Crouch End on Londoner Strasse).

The UK has only 5% of the public chargers needed by the end of the decade – and it will cost £ 16.7 billion to expand the network

The SMMT's analysis shows that a fully emission-free UK new car market will require 1.7 million public charging stations by 2030 and 2.8 million five years later.

In view of the fact that there are only 19,314 charging stations on the road today, the task is "daunting". By 2035, 507 chargers would have to be installed on the road every day, costing £ 16.7 billion.

The SMMT's recognition of the lack of charging infrastructure follows a report by the International Clean Transport Council last month claiming that the UK's existing network of public and workplace chargers is lacking.

It is estimated that between 341,000 and 430,000 public devices will need to be available nationwide by 2030 – even if charging at home accounts for 60 percent of battery needs.

The review of the national infrastructure found that London and Scotland are currently best positioned to meet future needs.

The ICCT study found that London (pictured) and Scotland are best placed to meet network goals for 2030, even though infrastructure is only a quarter of what will be needed by the end of the decade

The ICCT study found that London (pictured) and Scotland are best placed to meet network goals for 2030, even though infrastructure is only a quarter of what will be needed by the end of the decade

Both have around 25 percent of the chargers that are expected to be needed by 2030. However, fewer than 10 percent of public chargers will be needed in the Midlands, South Wales and Northern Ireland by the end of this decade.

That number was calculated based on the expectation that there will be around 5.2 to 6.7 million electrified cars – both battery and plug-in hybrids – on the road by the end of the decade.

Reflecting the demands of the SMMT, the ICCT said a huge expansion is needed, requiring 30 percent more public charging stations each year – and requiring more fast chargers that quickly increase the vehicle's battery capacity and are suitable for future models with higher charging capabilities are.

The most recent investment in the UK's charging infrastructure included £ 500m in the Rapid Motorway Charging System project and a further £ 200m investment fund to expand the public charging system.

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