ENTERTAINMENT

The big U-turn as A-Level AND GCSE is now based on the assessments of the teachers


Ministers made a humiliating U-turn today, agreeing that A-Level and GCSE scores in England will be based on teachers' ratings after a furious argument over grades.

Regulatory Authority Ofqual confirmed this afternoon that England would follow steps already taken by Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland after a controversial computer algorithm tagged thousands of teenagers.

It was announced that students could rate either the adjusted grade or the estimate made by their teachers higher.

Boris Johnson, who is on vacation in Scotland, is facing increasing pressure to move up. He held a conference call this morning with under fire Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson and officials.

Conservatives, Labor and Lib Dem MPs, along with angry teachers, union bosses and education leaders, have attacked the government's handling of the dispute.

In a statement, Ofqual Chairman Roger Taylor said, “We understand this has been a stressful time for students who received exam results last week for exams they never took.

“The pandemic created circumstances that nobody could have imagined or wished for. We want to take steps now to spare young people as much stress and insecurity as possible – and to free minds and teachers to work towards the important task of opening all schools in two weeks.

“After deliberation, we decided that the best way to do this is to assign grades based on the teachers submitted. The switch to the assessment grades for the center will apply to both AS and A levels, as well as the GCSE scores that students will receive later this week.

Union leader Keir Starmer said: “The government had months to clear exams and has now been forced into a screeching U-turn after days of confusion.

"This is a victory for the thousands of young people who have made their voices heard over the past week."

The U-turn came after:

  • Leading Conservative MPs, including Iain Duncan Smith, called for the A-level algorithm to be abolished and for teacher grades to be used.
  • In England it was feared that GCSE results could be delayed by fourteen days
  • Northern Ireland announced it will use teacher grades for GCSE results this week, not a computer program.
  • Ofqual board members suggested replacing their system with teacher grades.
  • Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham has taken legal action against Ofqual over the crisis.
  • Protests across the country continue as students march angrily over their grades.

High school graduates protest in the Ministry of Education against the result fiasco

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson has come under fire for the government's A-level algorithm – even criticized by some Ofqual board members

Young protesters have raised banners and placards with pictures of Gavin Williamson demanding that the Secretary of Education be sacked in Parliament Square in central London yesterday

Young protesters have raised banners and placards with pictures of Gavin Williamson demanding that the Secretary of Education be sacked in Parliament Square in central London yesterday

“There was no easy solution to the problem of assigning exam scores when no exams have taken place. Ofqual was asked by the Foreign Minister to develop a system for awarding calculated grades that would maintain the standards and ensure that grades are largely in line with previous years. Our goal has always been to protect public trust in educational qualifications.

“However, we recognize that while the approach we have taken has tried to achieve these goals, we also appreciate that it has also caused real agony and damaged public confidence. The expectation that schools would submit appeals with wrong grades weighed on teachers as they prepare for the new semester and created uncertainty and fear among students. We are very sorry for all of this.

“So we decided that this summer the students would get their grade for the center – that is, the grade their school or college estimated was the grade they would most likely have achieved on their exam – or the moderated grade , whichever is higher.

& # 39; The path that we want to implement now will urgently provide clarity. We are already working with the Ministry of Education, universities and anyone else affected by this problem. & # 39;

There are growing calls for ministers to abandon a controversial algorithm that was used to calculate scores after many students noticed a downgrade in predicted grades. Many believe that scores should be calculated based on teacher ratings instead.

The Welsh Government increased pressure on ministers this afternoon by announcing that students will receive A-Level and GCSE grades based on teacher assessments.

A similar announcement followed in Northern Ireland this morning.

The algorithm is also used for GCSEs, but Downing Street today insisted that the release of these results this Thursday would not be delayed for a two-week hiatus despite mounting pressure.

It came after Ofqual's review board blamed the government for the chaos. A senior member claimed that "policy changes every 12 hours" led to the debacle.

Professor Tina Isaacs, who sits on Ofqual's advisory group, told BBC Breakfast: “Ofqual's job is to run government policy. And if the guidelines change every 12 to 24 hours, Ofqual needs to deal with it as best it can.

"Hence the changes to the appeal process that Ofqual has now taken off the board so that it can think about it as much as possible given the time frame."

It was announced today that some Ofqual board members want to get rid of the algorithm, which resulted in nearly 40 percent of grades being downgraded from teacher predicted grades.

Critics have complained that the algorithm wrongly penalized many students, especially those who attend schools in deprived areas.

Eton's headmaster wrote a letter to parents criticizing the algorithm and describing it as "unfair" – one of several private and high schools that are beating up the government.

There are also fears that the algorithm caused a “bleeding” of public confidence in the results.

Some experts have said that a return to teacher ratings – as the Scottish Government had done – might be the "least bad option", but there are concerns that such an approach could lead to implausibly high grades.

Despite the downgrades and widespread anger, this year's results still rated the proportion of candidates with top marks at the highest level ever recorded.

A total of 27.9 percent of the participants achieved either an A or an A *, compared to 25.5 percent in 2019. Nine percent of the participants received an A * – another record high of 7.8 percent in the previous year. The general success rate (grades A * to E) was 98.3 percent – another record high.

Ofqual previously revealed how some teachers had given students "totally implausible" predicted grades. If they had been used, the A-Level scores this year would have been 14 percent better than in 2019. If the predicted grades were used for GCSEs, the scores would have been nine percent higher than last year.

A-Level and GCSE exams were canceled this year due to a disruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The prime minister has been called to cancel his vacation and go back to number 10 to solve the A-level score line that led to demonstrations from angry students in Whitehall.

Mr Johnson held a conference call with Mr Williamson this morning to discuss the matter and the government is expected to make an announcement this afternoon.

Mr Williamson's handling of the situation has sparked an angry backlash, but the Prime Minister's Deputy Official Spokesman today insisted that Mr Johnson has confidence in the Secretary of Education.

The speaker said, “Yes. The entire government has worked hard to find a fair system for students. & # 39;

The spokesman also said that "Ofqual continues to have the Prime Minister's support" and that Mr Johnson will be kept informed of developments during his absence.

The controversy over the A-Level results has resulted in the GCSE results having to be delayed.

But the Prime Minister's deputy official spokesman said at lunchtime, "We are not going to delay the GCSE results."

Some teachers feel that the algorithm should be scrapped entirely, while others feel that it should be recalibrated for fairer results so that mass complaints are not required.

Bill Watkin of the Sixth Form Colleges Association said correcting and re-executing the algorithm was an "automated individual call at the national institution level".

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program, “I think the first thing to do is recalibrate the algorithm and immediately run it again.

“I understand the government is focused on calling because the way forward and the two can happen together.

“So we should change the algorithm and run it again as a national, automated individual complaint at the institutional level.

"But we also have to make sure that no one gets a lower grade than what they already have."

Citing Tory grandees and former ministers, Iain Duncan Smith calls for the teacher-predicted grade algorithm to be scrapped in the chaos of A-level exams

Boris Johnson has come under pressure to intervene to end the deepening A-Level crisis in England amid mounting anger among students, teachers and Tory MPs.

Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said the A-level grades awarded by the algorithm should be abandoned and teachers' assessments or ridicules should be used instead.

"No algorithm will solve our problem, it's a human problem," he told LBC Radio.

He said concerns about "class inflation" could be allayed by accepting that 2020 will not be used as a benchmark for future years as some of the grades would have been "cooked off" by teachers.

"I think we are left with the very simple position that we need to be pretty precise with the evaluations or the ridicules – and / or the ridicules, you could do both, depending on when the evaluations were made – and then behind bring us and finish.

"The idea that you have an algorithm to find out what you might have done in an exam is really impossible, and I think that's where the big mistakes are made."

Paymaster and Cabinet Director General Penny Mordaunt said she is seeking "another meeting" with the Department of Education today after speaking with students and parents about exam results.

"I will support the colleges with their vocations and work to ensure that those who have the vocational grades can go to college this year if they want," she tweeted.

“This group of young people has already lost so much that we need to make sure that bright, capable students can take their next step. Delaying a year is not and should not be an option. For many this means that the training is abandoned. & # 39;

Ms. Mordaunt added: “I also shared my views on the GCSE results with the DfE. Will post updates later today. & # 39;

Conservative former Education Secretary Lord Baker von Dorking urged ministers to postpone the release of GCSE results, due this week, until issues with high school graduation are resolved.

Lord Baker, who introduced the GCSE system, said Thursday's announcement of the results should be delayed for two weeks to allow grades to be revised.

Veteran Tory Sir Edward Leigh has written to Secretary of Education Nick Gibb about the "blatant injustice" faced by some high school graduates.

The Gainsborough MP said: "I am concerned that some hardworking students have been demoted because this year's results are based on last year's results."

He said he had asked Mr. Gibb to reconsider the government's approach and allow teachers' assessments to be used when there were clear injustices.

Former Tory Minister Tracey Crouch has joined demands that A-level students in England receive teacher-graded grades because the Ofqual algorithm is "flawed".

The Tory MP for Chatham and Aylesford made a statement on social media saying, "Now that Ofqual is clear that it is a buggy algorithm, we should get back to the teacher grades.

"Some think this would lead to over-inflation – and maybe it would – but after speaking with a school principal this morning, I am confident that most schools have quality review procedures that would mean very few would be inflated, and if that were the case, given the world we are in right now, so what? These things have a way of sorting out in the long run.

“But if we want to make the changes, we have to do it today. A return to teacher grades won't solve the crisis – in fact, it may wreak havoc on university admissions – but it does allow A-level students to get the grades their teachers deem deserved, and we can look forward to Thursday focus. .. GCSE results day.

& # 39; Far more students will be affected if it goes on in GCSEs and (it) could have an even more devastating impact on university places.

“I have formally raised all of these points and hope that my ministers will listen. We need that sorted as soon as possible. & # 39;

Caroline Nokes, chairwoman of the women's and gender equality selection committee, was the youngest Tory MP to criticize the government's handling of the A-level crisis and suggested it could even conduct an investigation.

She tweeted that the algorithm problems "only affected young people and of course age is a protected characteristic," adding that, as chair of the committee, she would "support any request."

Tory Sir Robert Syms said the algorithm's decision on A-Level scores was "more unfair" than giving students their teacher-assessed grades.

Sir Robert told Times Radio, “Either you go for the simplest solution, which is Teacher Assessment (CAG), or you have a very generous and broad appointment system that will get people well above the 2% inflation rate. 4 or 5% more, so a lot of people are getting grades back. & # 39;

He added, “However, I am concerned that any school will be attractive because it has no cost, the government bears the cost, and 280,000 students have been downgraded.

“I'm assuming that each of you will want to bring up their grade, and can that be done in a week or two? I doubt it.

"I'm afraid what will happen to the government is that, having been caught by the algorithm, which of course the government itself didn't design, we now have a big problem … a scandal of slow appeals or the inability to Submit appeals.

“I get to the point that the simplest solution is to accept an inflation rate if the government is to get out of this problem. Because I think the way they did it with the Ofqual algorithm is more unfair than an inflation rate. & # 39;

Sir Robert added that he would be "pleased" if GCSE students received their teacher-graded grades and would be "the most Conservative MP".

Tory MP Sir Oliver Heald, a former minister, has urged the government to take action to correct results where students "feel they have committed injustice".

In a statement, the North East Hertfordshire MP said: “I have great sympathy for the students who have been disappointed with their results.

“Although teacher assessments alone can lead to class inflation, the Ofqual algorithm appears to be a blunt tool and has adversely affected schools and colleges with large sixth grades.

“I urge the government to make urgent changes to the system and advise all students to work with their schools and colleges on vocations that they feel may have been injustice.

"This shows the importance of having public exams and how difficult it is to develop a system that is nowhere near as good."

Mr. Watkin added, “Correct it and run it again. That way we should be able to see that the numbers are in line with previous years and not tens, if not hundreds of thousands of young people who are suffering as they are because they are not at the university of their choice or their employment Choice to come. & # 39;

Prof. Isaacs said the government and regulator Ofqual need to "reclaim" public confidence.

"Right now the public is losing confidence in the system," she told BBC Breakfast.

“And it's up to Ofqual, who I know works very hard. It is up to Ofqual, and especially the government, to try to create something that reclaims some of that public trust. I'm afraid it won't be able to get everything back. & # 39;

When asked if she was concerned that Thursday's GCSE Results Day could lead to a deterioration in public confidence, she replied, "I am very concerned indeed."

Professor Rob Coe, who is also on the Ofqual committee, said the panel is in a "totally no-win situation".

He admitted there is "no good way out" but closed to Scotland and now Northern Ireland by assigning students their grade for assessment of the center – the grades their teachers predicted -.

“The major disadvantage of only working with teacher-rated grades is the problem of class inflation. This is a problem because too many people would qualify for university or other goals at GCSE.

“That seems like a relatively minor issue compared to the amount of outrage there is and the political dynamism this whole thing is taking on, especially when the university slot cap is lifted.

“People in schools are just pulling their hairs out because they are unable to support students whose lives have been ruined and they don't know how the process goes because we didn't publish this guide. The whole thing is an absolute mess. & # 39;

High school students have also criticized the algorithm.

Dr. Mark Fenton, executive director of the Grammar School Heads Association, told the BBC that "a great injustice has been committed" with "extremely confusing" results for some students.

He said the "only fair result" would be to use teacher-recommended grades and remove the 5% limit on additional study places in England.

According to the BBC, research by the Sixth Form Colleges Association found this year's A-level sixth grade grades in England are below the average for the past three years – in some cases 20 percent lower than similar historical achievement.

Dr. Simon Hyde, the new general secretary of the Conference of Headmasters, which represents 296 leading private schools, has urged the government to use teacher-predicted grades.

He said, “The only way to stop this unbearable burden on students and teachers is to give the teacher evaluation grades, or CAGs.

“While we accept that the inevitable outcome is class inflation, we believe this is the less bad option when facing tens of thousands of students with unfair grades, thousands of schools facing an as-yet undeveloped appeal process, and most of us Need to focus energy in supporting the Prime Minister's desire to reopen our schools in a few weeks.

Dr. Hyde added, “Also, GCSE grades can be released as planned. The last thing anyone needs is more delay and confusion. & # 39;

Andy Burnham, Labor Mayor of Greater Manchester, said this morning he intends to take legal action over the results process.

He tweeted, “So it looks like the government is digging into their deeply flawed system.

In that case, I'm going to seek legal advice this morning and hire a senior attorney. I assume that I will write to Ofqual later today to take action. & # 39;

Several leading conservatives have put pressure on the government to abolish the controversial algorithm.

Former Tory leader Sir Iain said the A-level grades awarded by the algorithm should be abandoned and teachers' assessments or ridicules should be used instead.

"No algorithm will solve our problem, it's a human problem," he told LBC Radio.

He said concerns about "class inflation" could be allayed by accepting that 2020 will not be used as a benchmark for future years as some of the grades would have been "cooked off" by teachers.

"I think we are left with the very simple position that we need to be pretty precise with the evaluations or the ridicules – and / or the ridicules, you could do both, depending on when the evaluations were made – and then behind bring us and finish.

"The idea that you have an algorithm to find out what you might have done in an exam is really impossible, and I think that's where the big mistakes are made."

Paymaster and Cabinet Director General Penny Mordaunt said she is seeking "another meeting" with the Department of Education today after speaking with students and parents about exam results.

"I will support the colleges with their vocations and work to ensure that those who have the vocational grades can go to college this year if they want," she tweeted.

“This group of young people has already lost so much that we need to make sure that bright, capable students can take their next step. Delaying a year is not and should not be an option. For many this means that the training is abandoned. & # 39;

Ms. Mordaunt added: “I also shared my views on the GCSE results with the DfE. Will post updates later today. & # 39;

Former Tory Minister Tracey Crouch joined in calls for A-level students in England to receive teacher-graded grades because the Ofqual algorithm is "flawed".

The Tory MP for Chatham and Aylesford made a statement on social media saying, "Now that Ofqual is clear that it is a buggy algorithm, we should get back to the teacher grades.

"Some think this would lead to over-inflation – and maybe it would – but after speaking with a school principal this morning, I am confident that most schools have quality review procedures that would mean very few would be inflated, and if that were the case, given the world we are in right now, so what? These things have a way of sorting out in the long run.

“But if we want to make the changes, we have to do it today. A return to teacher grades won't solve the crisis – in fact, it may wreak havoc on university admissions – but it does allow A-level students to get the grades their teachers deem deserved, and we can look forward to Thursday focus. .. GCSE results day.

& # 39; Far more students will be affected if it goes on in GCSEs and (it) could have an even more devastating impact on university places.

“I have formally raised all of these points and hope that my ministers will listen. We need that sorted as soon as possible. & # 39;

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer has urged the Prime Minister to take "personal responsibility" for rectifying the problem, accusing him of being "invisible" during the turmoil.

Conservative former Education Secretary Lord Baker von Dorking urged ministers to postpone the release of GCSE results, due this week, until issues with high school graduation are resolved.

Lord Baker, who introduced the GCSE system, said Thursday's announcement of the results should be delayed for two weeks to allow grades to be revised.

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham is taking legal action against Ofqual over the A-Level Crisis

Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham will write to the UK Examination Board to initiate legal action over the A-Level Results Process.

He tweeted on Monday: “So it looks like the government is digging into its deeply flawed system and standing by it.

In that case, I'm going to seek legal advice this morning and hire a senior attorney. I assume that I will write to Ofqual later today to take action. & # 39;

The Labor Mayor is one of several opposition MPs criticizing the government's handling of the crisis.

Labor shadow education secretary Kate Green said the situation regarding A-level results was "shameful" and urged the government to "go the extra mile" to protect the future of young people.

Speaking on ITV's Good Morning Britain this morning, Ms Green said universities should "be flexible to cope with the horrors these young people are going through through no fault of their own".

She added: “At the same time, we know that universities have the capacity, or certainly did at the time the A-level results were published, also because the government has of course made it so much harder for international students to come to the UK .

“But you have to know, you need planning time. And of course universities can't wait forever.

“These places are filling up now and the government just needs to be absolutely clear on what basis the results are given to high school graduates, what grades they received. It has to be fair to these young people and then universities can fill in the places that still exist and students can get on with their lives. & # 39;

Ms. Green said the government "never really put young people first".

Caroline Nokes, chair of the Women and Equalities Select Committee, was the youngest Tory MP to criticize the government's handling of the A-level crisis and suggest they could even conduct an investigation.

She tweeted that the algorithm problems "only affected young people and of course age is a protected characteristic," adding that, as chair of the committee, she would "support any request."

David Laws, Executive Chairman of the Education Policy Institute, has called for a delay in the publication of GCSE results.

The former Liberal Democrat minister added: “It is clear that England is facing a crisis of confidence this week about exam assessment that is creating distress and uncertainty for schools, colleges and universities among students.

& # 39; It is important that GCSE grades are not released until Ofqual is confident that they are fair and robust and will not lead to further speculation or uncertainty and mass complaints.

& # 39; Ofqual has made an effort this year to maintain the credibility of the exam system as a whole, but this seems to come at a very high price for fairness to individual students.

'In choosing between maintaining exam standards and being fair to individual students, it is far more important to prioritize fairness to students.

"We also need to avoid vocations clogging our entire educational system – and Ofqual is very unlikely to be able to handle a large number of such vocations itself."

Labor shadow education secretary Kate Green said the situation regarding A-level results was "shameful" and urged the government to go "the extra mile" to protect the future of young people.

Speaking on ITV's Good Morning Britain this morning, Ms Green said universities should "be flexible to cope with the horrors these young people are going through through no fault of their own".

She added: “At the same time, we know that universities have the capacity, or certainly did at the time the A-level results were published, also because the government has of course made it so much harder for international students to come to the UK .

“But you have to know, you need planning time. And of course universities can't wait forever.

“These places are filling up now and the government just needs to be absolutely clear on what basis the results are given to high school graduates, what grades they received. It has to be fair to these young people and then universities can fill in the places that still exist and students can get on with their lives. & # 39;

Ms. Green said the government "never really put young people first".

She told GMB, "I think it's important that we give these young people the best opportunities in life and use the teacher grades this year."

When asked if GCSE results day should be postponed, Ms. Green said, “The government needs to make progress, tell us what it is doing and tell us when they can give us absolute certainty that this algorithm is working reliably or that they have found an alternate way of evaluating students that is reliable, and this must not be dragged on – these young people are dying to know about their future. & # 39;

Eton leads leading private and high schools on sophisticated government scrap algorithms

Eton's principal has led calls from private and high schools to abandon the controversial algorithm that set the results at A-Level.

Simon Henderson, Eton's director, said some students saw their teacher graded grades being downgraded through the standardization process, sometimes by more than one grade, "and in ways we find blatantly unfair on many occasions".

Mr Henderson said that it was the first year in a subject that students at the school had studied a particular curriculum and therefore there was no direct historical data on past performance.

"Rather than accepting our CAGs and / or considering alternative historical data in the previous curriculum that we followed (from the same review board), the board instead chose to apply the global dissemination of results for 2019 to our cohort." he wrote.

'This failed to take into account the fact that Eton is an academically selective school with a much narrower range of skills than the global spread. The scores awarded to many boys in this subject were unrelated to their CAGs or skills. As a result, some have lost their university places. & # 39;

Dr. Simon Hyde, the new general secretary of the Conference of Headmasters, which represents 296 leading private schools, has urged the government to use teacher-predicted grades.

He said, “The only way to stop this unbearable burden on students and teachers is to give the teacher evaluation grades, or CAGs.

“While we accept that the inevitable outcome will be class inflation, we believe this is the less bad option when facing tens of thousands of students with unfair grades, thousands of schools facing an as-yet undeveloped appeal process, and most of us Need to focus energy in supporting the Prime Minister's desire to reopen our schools in a few weeks.

Dr. Hyde added, “Also, GCSE grades can be released as planned. The last thing anyone needs is more delay and confusion. & # 39;

The high school headmistress said she lost trust in Ofqual because of dealing with the A-level crisis.

Kay Mountfield, head of Sir William Borlase's High School in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “It is clear to us that our grades are well below any grades we have ever had in school history have received.

& # 39; They are 10% lower than even the lowest grades we've ever received. They have absolutely no resemblance to our historical data. So that would be something any centralized review process would have tackled right away. & # 39;

She added that schools like hers have "downgraded 85% of their student cohort".

Ms. Mountfield told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “Only 38 out of 220 students kept their grades. Eighteen have been downgraded by three grades, 74 by two grades, and they're looking for university places that just aren't there.

“Seventy of my students haven't had the first choice for a university – usually that's around five or maybe ten students.

"But I have 70 high school students from various backgrounds who have worked very hard for their grades and are struggling to get into university."

When she allowed students to get their teacher graded grades, she added, “I realize it's not perfect. You can of course back this up with a calling system that may include looking at the bogus results when they are available and when they are perceived to be robust.

& # 39; I think under these exceptional circumstances that these students are this year, the fact that their education has already been so disrupted, we have said that teacher graded grades will be the basis of the A-level scores should.

"If there is no other fair way to determine GCSE results, we need to look into that and keep that option on the table for you as well."

Former Ofsted boss Sir Michael Wilshaw said: “This was a terrible farce … it is not a laughing matter because it affects thousands of young people whose expectations have been disappointed and their chances in life have been compromised.

& # 39; This is a terrible, terrible situation and I have to say Ofqual was almost invisible while all of this was going on.

"Whoever is in charge, the executive director and chairman, should have been much more known and visible in explaining the sector, explaining to principals where they are, what went wrong, and what they are going to do to put it correctly. & # 39;

He added, "Ofqual need to pull himself together and be much more visible."

Sir Michael said that "ultimately the politicians must take responsibility".

He said, “There has to be political responsibility, as in all things, at the end of the day someone has to carry the can and the politicians, the political leaders have to carry the can.

& # 39; The big danger for Gavin Williamson right now is that he is losing confidence – he is losing the trust of school principals across the country who have seen this happen.

“He didn't exactly get into fame with all sorts of changes of direction during the pandemic, saying that elementary schools would be open when they obviously couldn't be subject to the rules of social distancing and that every poor kid would get a laptop and obviously it isn't happens the school lunch voucher system didn't work.

"He'll lose the locker room if you want to."

Former Tory Secretary Stephen Hammond called the A-level scoring system and appeal process a "mess".

Wimbledon MP Mr. Hammond told Sky News about the appeal process: “So unfortunately it looks like it has evolved … from clarity to chaos very quickly.

“And I think now it is clear that by the end of today there has to be an appeal process that is fair, resolves the matter quickly, and is easy and transparent to understand so that we can help all of those people who are feeling desperate . frustrated with the grades they received. & # 39;

To Ofqual, Mr. Hammond said, "These are not the actions of a body that seems to know what it is doing."

Tory Sir Robert Syms said the algorithm's decision on A-Level scores was "more unfair" than giving students their teacher-assessed grades.

Sir Robert told Times Radio, “Either you go for the simplest solution, which is Teacher Assessment (CAG), or you have a very generous and broad appointment system that will get people well above the 2% inflation rate. 4 or 5% more, so a lot of people are getting grades back. & # 39;

He added, “However, I am concerned that any school will be attractive because it has no cost, the government bears the cost, and 280,000 students have been downgraded.

“I'm assuming that each of you will want to bring up their grade, and can that be done in a week or two? I doubt it.

"I'm afraid what will happen to the government is that, having been caught by the algorithm, which of course the government itself didn't design, we now have a big problem … a scandal of slow appeals or the inability to Submit appeals.

“I get to the point that the simplest solution is to accept an inflation rate if the government is to get out of this problem. Because I think the way they did it with the Ofqual algorithm is more unfair than an inflation rate. & # 39;

Sir Robert added that he would be "pleased" if GCSE students received their teacher-graded grades and would be "the most Conservative MP".

Students called for "Justice for State Schools" amid the ongoing battle over the zip code lottery to get a good grade

Students called for "Justice for State Schools" amid the ongoing battle over the zip code lottery to get a good grade

He added, “Some of these students have worked very hard since March, not just to prepare for exams but also to do coursework, and much of it would be a very good indication of their true abilities.

"And what the appeal process should do is take into account that these young people are not exam board numbers, they are real people who deserve fairness and the chance to get their future into a solid position very quickly."

The high school headmistress said she lost trust in Ofqual because of dealing with the A-level crisis.

Kay Mountfield, Leiter des Gymnasiums von Sir William Borlase in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, sagte gegenüber der Sendung Today von BBC Radio 4: „Es ist für uns klar, dass unsere Noten deutlich niedriger sind als alle Noten, die wir jemals in der Geschichte der Schule erhalten haben.

'Sie sind 10% niedriger als selbst die niedrigsten Noten, die wir je erhalten haben. Sie haben überhaupt keine Ähnlichkeit mit unseren historischen Daten. Das wäre also etwas, das jeder zentralisierte Überprüfungsprozess sofort in Angriff genommen hätte. & # 39;

Frau Mountfield fügte hinzu: „Ich habe das Gefühl, dass sie Menschen betrogen haben, die in gutem Glauben in dieses System eingetreten sind, sich dem gesamten Prozess der Schaffung von zentral bewerteten Noten mit Integrität angenähert haben und unser Vertrauen verloren haben, indem sie herausgekommen sind mit einer Reihe von Ergebnissen, die dazu geführt haben, dass kluge, leistungsstarke Studenten mit Bestrebungen und der Fähigkeit, an der Universität alle möglichen Dinge zu tun, ihren Platz verloren haben.

Protesters take part in a peaceful demonstration in Parliament Square in central London in response to Thursday's A-Level scores being downgraded

The final demand of today's protest was: "All universities should keep more offers and allow time to complete the appointment process."

The final demand of today's protest was: "All universities should keep more offers and allow time to complete the appointment process."

„Ich würde ihnen jetzt sagen, diesen Schülern ihre Plätze zurückgeben, mutig genug sein, zurückzutreten und zu sagen, dass dies nicht funktioniert hat, und das System anpassen.

"Wir müssen zu zentral bewerteten Noten übergehen, weil sie bei der Organisation eines zentralisierten Berufungsverfahrens zu langsam waren."

Will GCSE results be TWO WEEKS delayed? Top Tories urge Boris Johnson to postpone the markings due this Thursday

Boris Johnson faced calls last night to delay this week's GCSE results as the exam fiasco worsened.

He is facing growing anger from his own party over the "big mess" that surrounds the A-Level scores of millions of teenagers.

Lord Baker, who introduced the GCSE system, said Thursday's announcement of the results should be delayed for two weeks to allow grades to be revised.

It is feared that millions of students could downgrade their scores through a government algorithm used to assign grades after exams are canceled due to coronavirus.

Lord Baker described the algorithm as flawed and accused ministers of presiding over a system that had already produced "hundreds of thousands of unfair and barely explainable downgrades".

He added, "If you're in a hole, stop digging."

Robert Halfon, chairman of the Commons Education Committee, also admitted that a delay might be necessary.

"Unless they have fair grievances and Ofqual does not make it clear that their model is not unfairly disadvantageous, this may be a path for them to consider," the Conservative MP said.

Sie fügte hinzu, dass Schulen wie ihre "85% ihrer Schülerkohorte herabgestuft" haben.

Frau Mountfield sagte gegenüber der Sendung Today von BBC Radio 4: „Nur 38 von 220 Studenten haben ihre Noten behalten. Achtzehn wurden um drei Noten herabgestuft, 74 um zwei Noten und sie suchen nach Universitätsplätzen, die einfach nicht da sind.

„Siebzig meiner Studenten hatten noch nicht die erste Wahl für eine Universität – normalerweise sind das etwa fünf oder vielleicht zehn Studenten. Aber ich habe 70 Gymnasiasten mit unterschiedlichem Hintergrund, die sehr hart für ihre Noten gearbeitet haben und Schwierigkeiten haben, an eine Universität zu gelangen. & # 39;

The GCSE results are due to be released this week. The government algorithm is used to compute millions of outcomes, leading to fears that the A-level crisis could repeat itself on an even larger scale.

Schoolchildren in Northern Ireland will receive the grades their teachers predict, Stormont's minister of education has announced.

Just a few days before the results were published on Thursday, Peter Weir discarded a plan in which the grades would have been calculated using a mathematical model that takes into account the previous performance of the schools.

However, the plan to use a mathematical model remains the same in the UK, despite the excitement caused by using an algorithm on high school exams.

Mr Johnson was expected to be on a camping holiday in Scotland this week with his fiancée Carrie Symonds and young son Wilfred.

As Labor called for a press conference to be held to explain how it would remedy the "historical injustice" of students whose grades had been recorded, Downing Street could not say whether the trip would continue.

The Ministry of Education (DfE) has stated that it will continue to work with the regulator Ofqual to “build as much fairness into the appeal process as possible” in order to deal with what it calls “toughest cases”.

"Ofqual continues to consider how best to implement the appeal process to give schools and students the clarity they need," a DfE spokesman said in a statement released late Sunday.

Posters reading "Give me my grades back" and "Downgrade Williamson, not students" were waved as students and parents unpacked Parliament Square

Posters reading "Give me my grades back" and "Downgrade Williamson, not students" were waved as students and parents unpacked Parliament Square

London protesters modeled in Edinburgh and Cardiff (pictured) called on the government to "recognize the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their detrimental effects on society".

London protesters modeled in Edinburgh and Cardiff (pictured) called on the government to "recognize the disproportionate nature of grades in deprived areas and their detrimental effects on society".

A protester stands with her self-made sign with a picture of the Prime Minister, branding him a "classic" and saying: "Britain deserves better"

A protester stands with her self-made sign with a picture of the Prime Minister, branding him a "classic" and saying: "Britain deserves better"

However, the Examination Board's decision to produce guidelines over the weekend for students using mock exam results as a basis for an appeal was not supported by the decision not to withdraw them until hours later.

Northern Ireland students will receive GCSE grades based on teacher predictions and NOT a mathematical model

GCSE students in Northern Ireland will receive the grades their teachers predict, Stormont's minister of education has announced.

Just a few days before the results were published on Thursday, Peter Weir discarded a plan in which the grades would have been calculated using a mathematical model that takes into account the previous performance of the schools.

The great political shift is taking place amid a heated controversy in Northern Ireland over the A-level rating system.

The move affects the grades awarded by the Northern Ireland Examination Board, the Curriculum, Examinations and Assessment Council (CCEA).

CCEA accounts for 97% of all GCSEs conducted in the region. Students who should attend GCSEs set by registrars in England or Wales will continue to be assessed according to the approach of those organizations.

The Stormont congregation is expected to be called back from summer recess to discuss the excitement caused by the standardization formula used for high school graduation.

More than a third of the A-level grades issued last Thursday were below teachers' estimates.

No explanation was given for the move, although Labor said it undermined student assurances by Education Secretary Gavin Williamson regarding the appeal process.

Mr. Williamson made a "triple lock" commitment last week that students can get the highest score from their teacher's predicted grade, their mock exam, or an actual fall exam.

But the Ofqual guidance said if the bogus score was higher than the teacher's prediction, the teacher's prediction would count.

In another setback for the education minister, some Ofqual members have now also called for the algorithm to be dropped.

Mr Williamson has consistently argued that moderation is essential to preventing "rampant inflation" after the actual exams in the coronavirus crisis were canceled and has insisted that there can be no turnaround.

However, critics have complained that Ofqual's algorithm for the adjustments penalized students in schools in deprived areas and benefited those in private schools.

These concerns should strengthen the hands of teaching unions, who are pushing for teacher evaluation as the only fair way to go.

Overall, nearly 40% of all A-level grades in England have been lowered as a result of the standardization process, and ministers are now ready for further backlash when the GCSE results – moderated using the same algorithm – are released on Thursday.

Former Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable, who served in coalition with the Conservatives under David Cameron, warned that the problem would do "permanent damage" to the government.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Westminster Hour, he said that an "act of bad will" could hit ministers in particular.

"The Royal Statistical Society offered help to improve this algorithm to make it more real and realistic," he said.

“And the aid was turned down because the statisticians were unwilling to sign a toggle clause promising not to reveal what they found.

"That kind of background dishonesty really doesn't help the smell of this whole thing."

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