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The Best Young Makers of 2021: Forbes Reveals 30 Under 30


They are the brightest and most daring and give every reason to be hopeful in 2021.

Amid the dire pandemic, Forbes has released its annual 30-under-30 list that features the top young movers and shakers in the United States and Canada before 2021.

Some of these under 30-year-olds are defying the opportunities and building businesses despite Covid-19. others help fight the disease, serve on the hospital front lines, or work with AI to discover new drugs.

The 600-strong list includes household names like Ben Simmons, the NBA star of the Philadelphia 76s, musicians Lil Baby and Roddy Ricch, and actors Ramy Youssef and Sabrina Carpenter, but many are likely unknown to most.

Ben Simmons, # 25 of the Philadelphia 76ers, is one of 30 sports stars to list Forbes 30 under 30 in 2021. The list includes a total of 600 award winners in 20 different categories

Their median age is 26.6 and they have raised over $ 1 billion in venture funding. A total of 20 percent are immigrants from 62 countries.

"Despite the pandemic, global recession, and social justice movement here in the US, today's young entrepreneurs are still enterprising, striving to solve the world's problems and find a way that will benefit us all" said Randall Lane. Forbes & # 39; Chief Content Officer.

Alexandra Wilson, the editor of Forbes Under 30, said: & # 39; Some are defying opportunities and building businesses despite Covid-19; others help fight the disease, serve on the hospital front lines, or work with A.I. discover new drugs. & # 39;

A number of well-known judges have been drafted to make the decision on who made the cut for this year's list, including Taylor Swift, who was previously on the list herself.

The 20 different categories include: Art & Style, Consumer Technology, Education, Energy, Business Technology, Finance, Food & Drink, Games, Healthcare, Hollywood & Entertainment, Manufacturing, Marketing & Advertising, Media, Music, Retail, Science, Social Entrepreneurship, Social Media, sports and venture capital.

Below are 40 of the nominees for each category out of a total of 600 nominees selected for this year's list.

Hollywood and entertainment

Jeremy Pope, 28, actor

Jeremy Pope, 28, actor

Ramy Youssef, 29, founder, Cairo Cowboy

Ramy Youssef, 29, founder, Cairo Cowboy

Jeremy Pope, 28, actor

Pope has taken Broadway by storm. Last year he became the first black man in history to receive two Tony nominations for various roles that same year – an acting nomination for Choir Boy and a musical reference to Ain & # 39; t Too Proud, for which he also received a Grammy nomination received.

He was Emmy nominated that year for his first onscreen role in Ryan Murphy's Hollywood for Netflix.

Next up, he'll play Sammy Davis Jr. in the upcoming Janet Mock-directed movie Scandalous!

Ramy Youssef, 29, founder, Cairo Cowboy

After a stint at See Dad Run in 2012 and the time he spent shadowing the show's writing room, Youssef spawned his own Hulu series, Ramy, which followed the adventures of a first-generation Muslim American.

Youssef, who also starred on the show, won a Golden Globe for his performance, and the series won a Peabody Award.

It has been extended for a third season and he is working on other series with underrepresented groups through his production company Cairo Cowboy.

Sports

BEN SIMMONS, 24 – Point Guard, Philadelphia 76ers

Ben Simmons, Point Guard, Philadelphia 76ers

Australian Ben Simmons is six feet 10 inches taller than the average NBA player, four inches taller than the average NBA player, and was selected as the No. 1 draft pick by Louisiana State University in 2016 by Louisiana State University.

He is predicted to make $ 177 million over the next several years, along with recommendations from Nike, SmartWater, and Beats by Dre worth up to $ 6 million annually.

A avid video game gamer, Simmons recently invested in sports company FaZe Clan and already has an interest in performance technology company Hyperice.

"I think the future of the sport is as strong as that of the NBA," he told Forbes.

IGOR KARLICIC, 29 – Co-Founder, Monarc

Igor Karlicic, Co-Founder, Monarc

Igor Karlicic, Co-Founder, Monarc

Karlicic co-founded Monarc, the company behind the Seeker – the world's first robotic quarterback system used by college sports programs – including the LSU.

The company's intellectual property in the system spans multiple sports and raised $ 1.3 million in seed capital, including from NFL players.

music

Roddy Ricch, 22, musician

Roddy Ricch, 22, musician

Roddy Ricch, 22, musician

This was a big year for rapper Roddy Ricch, who won his first Grammy for his debut album and grossed $ 20 million.

The breakout single The Box went viral on TikTok, with more than 1.2 billion videos using the song.

Ricch, born in Compton, is investing his money back in the community, particularly in real estate, but also plans to set up a foundation to teach financial literacy to the city's residents.

Ava Max, 26, musician

Ava Max, 26, musician

Ava Max, 26, musician

Albanian-American Max was one of the breakout stars of the year after releasing her debut album and playing almost every American talk show late into the night.

Kings & Queens single spent five weeks at # 1, and the music video for their single Sweet by Psycho was viewed more than 600 million times on YouTube.

Max had a dedicated following before her first record even came out, garnering four billion streams from her previous material.

Social media

MARQUES BROWNLEE, 27- YouTuber

Marques Brownless, YouTuber

Marques Brownless, YouTuber

Brownless runs a popular YouTube channel called MKBHD, where he introduces the latest video technology to over 13 million subscribers.

In the last month alone, his channel received 700 million views and has come a long way since he posted his first YouTube video in high school. He's been checking out the HP Pavilion laptop that he bought with his saved permission.

His channel really gained in importance when he graduated from Stevens Institute of Technology. Today he's the preferred appraiser for smartphones, laptops, headphones, game consoles, smartwatches and even Tesla cars.

JALAIAH HARMON, 15 – dancer

Jalaiah Harmon, dancer

Jalaiah Harmon, dancer

Harmon is best known as the creator of Renegade Dance – a hit in TikTok choreography – for which she received no credit until white celebrities made him famous.

This served to shed light on a divide between white social media influencers and representatives of minority groups, and resulted in Harmon rising from 2,000 followers on the app to over 3 million on social media.

Since then, she has appeared in the 2020 NBA All Star Game, appeared on the Ellen Degeneres Show, and signed deals with some of the world's biggest brands, including Netflix.

media

XIAOYIN QU, 27 – Co-Founder, Run The World

Xiaoyin Qu, Co-Founder, Run The World

Xiaoyin Qu, Co-Founder, Run The World

After her mother found out about the problems she was having at an international medical conference in Chicago, Qu from China and Xuan Jiang founded Run The World – an online professional events venue.

The platform launched in February and a month later events around the world were canceled as the travel area stalled due to the coronavirus.

As a result, Run The World has grown from five to 45 employees and has hosted 10,000 virtual events. This also includes a virtual cocktail party where participants are brought together for a five-minute one-on-one conversation with other participants.

The platform has raised $ 15 million from investors, including actor Will Smith's Dreamers venture capital fund.

OMAR JIMENEZ, 27 – National Correspondent, CNN

Omar Jimenez, National Correspondent, CNN

Omar Jimenez, National Correspondent, CNN

Jimenez is a national Chicago correspondent for CNN and was the network's main reporter covering the death of Kobe Bryant in January. He was also recognized in this year's protests against Black Lives Matter.

In a now infamous incident, Jimenez and his television crew were arrested on live television covering protests in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd.

Because of his composure during his arrest, he won a First Amendment Award for "consummate professionalism".

Venture capital

FREDERIK GROCE, 29 – Co-Founder, BLCK VC

Freferik Groce, Co-Founder, BLCK VC

Freferik Groce, Co-Founder, BLCK VC

Groce co-founded BLCK VC – a San Francisco-based nonprofit – with Sydney Syke in 2018. The organization's mission is to double the number of black investors employed by centure capital firms 4 percent.

In October of this year, BLCK VC announced that partner companies – such as Salesforce Ventures – have committed to completing 300 VC-trained scholars over three years.

Among other things, Groce is also a principle at Storm Ventures, where he has led investments in startups like Camino and Next Request.

MAYA HORGAN FAMODU, 29 – Founder, Ingressive Capital

Maya Horgan Famodu, Founder, Ingressive Capital

Maya Horgan Famodu, Founder, Ingressive Capital

Horgan Famodu is a Nigerian-American entrepreneur who, after working at JPMorgan, founded Ingressive Capital – a company providing market entry, technology research, and market and operational services to companies and companies expanding into Africa.

She also founded Ingressive Capital, a venture capital fund that invests in technology companies based in Africa. She is also the founder of the High Growth Africa Summit, a two-day conference to set up a high-growth African company.

It was previously on the 30-under-30 list in the Technology category in 2018.

energy

ALEX LIEGL, 28 – Co-Founder, Layer1

Alex Liegl, Co-Founder, Layer1

Alex Liegl, Co-Founder, Layer1

Liegl combined power generation with bitcoin mining. Layer1 is the "world's most efficient watt-to-bitcoin converter," using wind turbines to power its wind-powered bitcoin mining machines.

It costs Liegl about $ 1,000 to mine a single bitcoin, which is currently trading at well over $ 10,000.

In doing so, he also helps the local power grid manage its load, with the bitcoin mining machines acting as insurance by allowing it to shut down its machines when the wind stops blowing.

ANGELIQUE AHLSTRÖM, 29 – Co-Founder, Flash Forest

Angelique Ahlstrom, Co-Founder, Flashforest

Angelique Ahlstrom, Co-Founder, Flashforest

In 2021, Flash Forest will plant hundreds of thousands of seedlings across Canada using flying drones.

The company aims to be the most cost effective method of reforestation. By 2023, the cost should be 75 cents per planted seedling.

"Our motivation is to have a significant, noticeable impact on climate change in our lives and to revolutionize the reforestation industry on a truly planetary level," says the company.

Healthcare

MATT MCCAMBRIDGE, 29 – Co-Founder of Eden Health

Matt McCambridge, co-founder of Eden Health

Matt McCambridge, co-founder of Eden Health

Eden Health promises to cut corporate healthcare costs by up to $ 800 per employee each year by providing primary care doctors and employees who are part of the company's team.

By using pop-up clinics and app-based virtual consultations, Eden reduces unnecessary hospital visits, appointments and tests.

The company has raised $ 39 million in venture capital and promises to revolutionize healthcare for medium-sized businesses (with 10-5,000 employees).

PRAKRITI GABA, 28 – Cardiologist at Harvard University

Prakriti Gaba, a cardiologist at Harvard University

Prakriti Gaba, a cardiologist at Harvard University

As a doctor and researcher, Prakriti Gaba was on the front lines of the Covid-19 pandemic at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

She was inspired by what she was certain in the worst case of the pandemic, advocating changes to increase the speed and efficiency of clinical trials that could lead to new treatments.

Gaba was the first author of an article in Nature Reviews Cardiology looking at ways to transform the clinical trial process to employ remote consent and surveillance programs.

education

Joanna Smith, 29, founder of AllHere Education

Joanna Smith, 29, founder of AllHere Education

Joanna Smith, 29, founder of AllHere Education

Founded in 2017, Smith's company works with schools to address chronic truancy, but when The pandemic started and schools closed. Smith wasn't sure her business would survive.

She quickly developed a chatbot system that not only helps with training, but can also help students struggle with their jobs, troubleshoot technical issues, and provide confidential healthcare recommendations.

AllHere's customer base has grown dramatically. 2,000 schools in 15 states now pay an annual subscription fee of $ 2 per student

Aly Murray, 26, co-founder, UPchieve

Aly Murray, 26, co-founder, UPchieve

Aly Murray, 26, co-founder, UPchieve

Murray left the trading floor at JPMogran in 2018 to work full-time at their nonprofit, which hires volunteers to provide real-time tutoring and study admissions to low-income students.

To date, over 2,7000 students have used UPchieve, and the group has raised $ 1 million from individuals and corporate partners.

Murray was a low-income student herself and knew that there was a market for the services her company offered.

Finances

Alex Bouaziz, 27, co-founder, Deel

Alex Bouaziz, 27, co-founder, Deel

Alex Bouaziz, 27, co-founder, Deel

Bouaziz co-founded Deel to help companies hiring and managing remote teams with software that creates contracts and manages wage payments.

The rating has more than tripled since it was founded in May 2020 as more people are working remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Bouaziz said the company is now worth more than $ 200 million.

Flori Marquez, 29, Co-Founder, BlockFi

Flori Marquez, 29, Co-Founder, BlockFi

Flori Marquez, 29, Co-Founder, BlockFi

Cryptocurrency Lending Platform BlockFi allows crypto holders to borrow currencies at rates of up to 8.6%.

The platform also offers cryto trading services that raise more than $ 100 million from venture capital firms.

The company has 100,000 funded accounts, is well on its way to $ 120 million in revenue this year, and is preparing for an IPO.

Art and style

Jooyeon Song, 29, co-founder of ManiMe

Jooyeon Song, 29, co-founder of ManiMe

Jooyeon Song, 29, co-founder of ManiMe

Korean-born and former BCG consultant, Song couldn't stand the two hours he'd spent manicuring in a salon and suspected that other busy young professionals might as well.

With David Miró Llopis, she created a series of precisely fitting, stick-on gel nails in 2017. Customers take a photo of their nails and send it to the startup, which uses 3D modeling to create the perfect nail set from $ 15.

Revenue is projected to exceed $ 3 million this year. Many salons are closed due to the pandemic.

Jamall Osterholm, 26, founder, Jamall Osterholm

Jamall Osterholm, 26, founder, Jamall Osterholm

Jamall Osterholm, 26, founder, Jamall Osterholm

Osterholm might be recognizable to some as a candidate for the 2019 series of Bravo's Project Runway.

As a designer of men's fashion, he showed three times at New York Fashion Week with futuristic designs shaped by the past.

He currently works for Kerby Jean-Raymond's Pyer Moss label and has designed and creatively directed an award-winning film.

Enterprise technology

Chazz Sims, 29, Co-Founder, Wise Systems

Chazz Sims, 29, Co-Founder, Wise Systems

Chazz Sims, 29, Co-Founder, Wise Systems

Sims' company uses machine learning to plan delivery routes and make adjustments for traffic, new orders, and driver locations in real time.

Thanks to the software, recipients can know when they can expect their delivery within a time window of 20 minutes.

Anheuser-Busch uses the software for 750 beer trucks and Lyft has also taken it over to plan repairs. The startup has raised $ 24 million in venture funding.

Deborah Raji, 24, founding member of the Algorithmic Justice League

Deborah Raji, 24, founding member of the Algorithmic Justice League

Deborah Raji, 24, founding member of the Algorithmic Justice League

A lawyer since high school, Raji is now campaigning against the largest corporations in the world.

Her non-profit association aims to raise awareness of the social impact of AI. Projects included an audit of an Amazon facial recognition product that found it was less accurate for women with darker skin than for white men.

Over 70 top AI researchers have signed an open letter in support of their work, which led Amazon and others to stop selling their facial recognition product to the police.

science

Maddie Hall, 28, co-founder, Living Carbon

Maddie Hall, co-founder, Living Carbon

Maddie Hall, co-founder, Living Carbon

Hall's company grows poplar and pine that have been genetically engineered to absorb more carbon dioxide than normal plants, grow faster, and produce more durable wood.

Hall hopes her company can become a "Tesla for Trees" as it is both environmentally friendly and cool.

The love for nature runs in Hall's family – her grandmother was a botanist, her mother made flowers and her uncle was a lumberjack.

Jelena Notaros, 27, assistant professor, MIT

Jelena Notaros, Assistant Professor, MIT

Jelena Notaros, Assistant Professor, MIT

Notators is working on the production of new silicon photonics systems that offer solutions to problems with displays, sensors, communication, quanta and biology.

She recently pioneered a display made from a single undetectable transparent photonic chip.

The display sits in front of a user's eye and projects 3D holograms that only he can see.

manufacturing industry

ALEXANDER LE ROUX, 28 – co-founder, icon

Alexander Le Roux, co-founder of Icon

Alexander Le Roux, co-founder of Icon

Le Roux was the master behind Vulcan – a 12-foot-tall 3D printer that uses concrete and can build a house in 24 hours for up to 30 percent less than normal methods.

Icon built its first permanent 3D-printed house in 2018 and has since built 16 more in Austin, Texas, and has expanded to Mexico as well.

There the company, which raised $ 44 million, is building the world's first 3D printed community for low-income families.

Icon has also received funding to help NASA find a way to build structures on the moon.

Payam Pourtaheri, 27; Ameer Shakeel, 26 – Co-founder, AgroSpheres

The founders of AgroSpheres – Pourtaheri and Shakeel – both came from developing countries (Iran and Pakistan respectively) and witnessed how pesticide abuse had contaminated the environment.

While they were studying together at the University of Virginia, they founded the company with the aim of creating a crop protection system that could replace the harmful chemicals.

There are currently 30 patents pending worldwide that enable a range of biocontrol products that are an alternative to synthetic chemicals, and they have received $ 11 million in funding.

Payam Pourtaheri, Co-Founder, AgroSphere

Ameer Shakeel, co-founder of AgroSpheres

Payam Pourtaheri and Ameer Shakeel, co-founders of AgroSpheres

Eat Drink

Dan Leyva, co-owner of Wings Over

Dan Leyva, co-owner of Wings Over

DAN LEYVA, 28 – Co-Owner, Wings Over

When Leyva's favorite New York place for wings – Wings Over – was closed, he was so devastated that he persuaded three wealthy college friends to invest him for an estimated $ 10 million to buy the entire franchise.

He improved the menu – removed frozen meat and branded items like burgers – and revolutionized online ordering, design and branding for the 20-year-old chain.

Revenue has since grown 20 percent to over $ 50 million, and it has just opened its thirty-seventh location in New Jersey.

Priya Krishna, author of the cookbook & # 39; Indian-ish & # 39;

Priya Krishna, author of the cookbook & # 39; Indian-ish & # 39;

PRIYA KRISHNA, 29

Krishna is a YouTube chef personality and contributes to publications such as the New York Times.

In April 2019, she published her best-selling cookbook, titled "Indian-ish," which was named one of the best cookbooks of Spring by a number of publications including the New York Times, New York Magazine, Eater, Food & Wine and enjoy your meal.

She's now putting on a TV show and writing a new cookbook with David Chang, the founder of Momofuku.

Social influence

CLEMENTINE JACOBY, 29 – Co-Founder, Recidiviz

Clementine Jacoby, co-founder of Recidiviz

Clementine Jacoby, co-founder of Recidiviz

Recidiviz – co-founded by Jacoby in 2018 – aims to use data to tackle criminal justice reform in order to gain a systemic understanding of the system.

It aggregates and standardizes fragmented data across the system, including prisons, parole, and probation.

As the coronavirus spread through the prison system, North Dakota used Recidiviz to determine who was eligible for an early release and to track its impact on public safety.

In this way, the state has reduced its prison population by 25 percent in one month. The country has received $ 15 million in funding.

KIMBERLIE LE, 25; JOSHUA NIXON, 26 – Co-Founder, Prime Roots

Together, the founders of Prime Roots make seafood and other meat alternatives and have raised $ 18 million for their meat alternatives.

The company uses a Japanese plant-based super protein that mimics the taste and texture of beef, chicken, and seafood.

Kimberlie Le

Joshua Nixon

Kimberlie Le (left) and Joshua Nixon (right), co-founders of Prime Roots

Retail & E-Commerce

CAMI TÉLLEZ, 23 – Co-Founder, Parade

Téllez founded Parade with the aim of designing underwear whose sole focus was not sex appeal. Instead, it's fun, colorful, and available in inclusive sizes.

The daughter of Colombian immigrants calls the industry a "$ 13 billion category in crisis" and targets Gen-Z with the company's super-soft underwear made from 85 percent recycled plastic and compostable packaging.

To date, Parade has sold over 650,000 pairs of underwear and is well on its way to generating $ 10 million in sales in 2020 alone.

ANN MCFERRAN, 27 – Co-Founder, Glamnetic

McFerran, who immigrated from Thailand at the age of seven, found that sticking eyelashes on was difficult and didn't last long.

To solve the problem, she set out to test some prototypes and develop magnetic eyelashes that only take seconds to apply, that won't fall off and that can be reused 40 times.

After launching in August 2019, the company is now on track for $ 50 million in revenue this year.

Marketing & Advertising

Chirag Kulkarni, 25, Co-Founder, Medly Pharmacy

Chirag Kulkarni, 25, Co-Founder, Medly Pharmacy

Chirag Kulkarni, 25, Co-Founder, Medly Pharmacy

The frustration of waiting in the pharmacy prompted Kulkarni to try something different in 2017.

He raised $ 110 million for an online pharmacy that offers same-day delivery of prescriptions through an app that connects customers with pharmacists who can answer questions.

Instead of investing in advertising campaigns, Medly chose to convince doctors to refer patients and has 70,000 users to date.

Apoorva Dornadula, 25, and Michelle Lu, 22, co-founder, Viralspace

Viralspace started as a class project between Dornadula, Lu and their third co-founder Hiro Tien.

With the help of AI, marketers can harness the power of data to make decisions about images and videos.

The trio has raised $ 1.7 million since launching in 2019.

Apoorva Dornadula

Michelle Lu

Apoorva Dornadula, 25, and Michelle Lu, 22, co-founder, Viralspace

Games

Yang Liu, 29, Co-Founder, End Game Interactive

Yang Liu, Co-Founder, End Game Interactive

Yang Liu, Co-Founder, End Game Interactive

In 2018, Liu and Luke Zbihlyj founded End Game Interactive and developed simple but addicting online games like the ones Liu played as a kid.

One of the first big hits was developed in less than a month, unlike many games that take years to develop – and attracted 65 million players.

The company has attracted investors like Twitch co-founder Kevin Lin and talent manager Scooter Braun.

Imane Anys, 24, streamer, Pokimane

Imane Anys, 24, Pokimane

Imane Anys, 24, Pokimane

Anys, the top streamer on the Twitch gaming platform, has around 6 million followers under her pseudonym Pokimane.

The award-winning streamer became known for League of Legends and Fortnite and was a co-founder of the Offline TV collective.

That year she signed a deal with Twitch promising to stream exclusively on the platform for years to come, became the creative director of a gaming apparel brand, and started a scholarship for UC Irvine's esports program.

Consumer technology

Ben Pasternak, 21, founder, simulating

Ben Pasternak, 21, founder, simulating

Ben Pasternak, 21, founder, simulating

Pasternak built its brand around making beloved chicken nuggets with nuggets, a vegan version of their favorite food, available to everyone.

Selling primarily online, Nuggs is well on its way to bringing the company $ 8 million in sales this year after Pasternak tested thousands of formulas to find the perfect replacement.

The next challenge for the Australian-born IT pro, who dropped out of school at 15 and sold a video chat app he created when he was 18, is vegetarian hot dogs.

Christelle Rohaut, 26, co-founder, Codi

Christelle Rohaut, 26, Mitbegründerin, Codi

Christelle Rohaut, 26, Mitbegründerin, Codi

Codi ist ein Home-Office-Sharing-Unternehmen, mit dem Benutzer Räume in ihrem Haus als Arbeitsbereich an andere Personen verleihen können.

Die Pandemie hat die Pläne für dieses Jahr etwas gedämpft, aber das Unternehmen wurde in San Francisco wiedereröffnet und bald in weiteren Städten eingeführt.

Das Unternehmen, das als "Airbnb des Coworking" bezeichnet wird, wird von Coatue, NFX und anderen unterstützt.

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