ENTERTAINMENT

The BBC's political drama Roadkill has been criticized for "left-wing bias".


The BBC's new political drama Roadkill was criticized today for its "leftist bias" as calls for a new chairman to prevent the station from "disappearing in a cloud of smoke" grew.

In the drama, Hugh Laurie plays the corrupt minister of the Tory government, Peter Laurence, who is on trial in the first episode during a libel trial, sleeps with his lover and buries evidence of a love child.

Concerns about left-wing bias at the BBC has led Prime Minister Boris Johnson to press for a right-wing figure to take the role of chairman.

Laurence Fox said the drama, written by Hampstead playwright David Hare, showed that the move was "badly needed".

In Roadkill, Hugh Laurie plays the corrupt minister of the Tory government, Peter Laurence

It has been criticized by viewers, including This Morning host India Willoughby, who referred to it as the "Poundland House of Cards".

It has been criticized by viewers, including This Morning host India Willoughby, who referred to it as the "Poundland House of Cards".

He told MailOnline, “I never watch the BBC and it is certainly not my job to defend the Tory Party, but I don't watch it because so much of the content is a lecture out of a number of stereotypes. A moral game.

"A new chairman is urgently needed before the BBC disappears on a Woke Smoke train."

Mr Johnson had previously appointed former Daily Telegraph editor Charles Moore as chairman of the BBC but chose not to take part in the race for "personal reasons".

Responding to criticism of Roadkill, Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen said: “It's a great shame that Charles Moore didn't want it (the role of chairman). He probably thinks it went too far.

“But you have to do something to save the BBC from itself or no one will see you.

& # 39; This show is just another anti-conservative trump card the BBC has. If they did the same for a left-wing character, it would likely be classified as a hate crime. "

The Prime Minister's support for Lord Moore sparked controversy. Former Question Time moderator David Dimbleby said he was "appalled" at the idea that he would take on the role.

Rebecca Ryan, campaign director for Defund the BBC, said today: “David Dimbleby may be 'appalled' by the idea that the next BBC chairman is a right-wing figure, but it looks like some balance is needed .

"With the BBC losing 550 royalty payers a day, perhaps they should be wondering if a drama series is painting the party, which was overwhelmingly backed by the British people as devious, scandalous schemers less than a year ago." Problem. & # 39;

Laurence Fox said the drama, written by Hampstead playwright David Hare, showed that reform of the BBC was "urgently needed".

Laurence Fox said the drama, written by Hampstead playwright David Hare, showed that reform of the BBC was "urgently needed".

The program was praised by several newspaper critics and viewers on Twitter. But others planned it as politically biased

The program was praised by several newspaper critics and viewers on Twitter. But others planned it as politically biased

The first episode of Roadkill aired last night with a stellar cast that included Hugh Laurie, Helen McCrory, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Sarah Greene and Pip Torrens.

Tory Minister Peter Laurence is portrayed as a charismatic, ruthless and self-centered politician who repeatedly lies in order to maintain his power.

In one scene, he visits a women's prison to negotiate with a potential blackmailer. When he later hears that riots have broken out in prison, he mumbles, "Let's hope there are injuries. Better still, deaths."

The program's creator, David Hare, has openly admitted that the program is a test of the "pull of conservative values".

In a press release, he said, “In Roadkill, I wanted to ask what happens when you put ideals of freedom and personal responsibility above all other virtues.

"I was also interested in believing that each of us is solely responsible for the fate and progress of our own lives."

The program was praised by several newspaper critics and viewers on Twitter. But others planned it as politically biased.

The first episode of Roadkill aired last night with a stellar cast including Helen McCrory, (pictured) Pippa Bennett-Warner, Sarah Greene and Pip Torrens

The first episode of Roadkill aired last night with a stellar cast including Helen McCrory, (pictured) Pippa Bennett-Warner, Sarah Greene and Pip Torrens

Today's presenter India Willoughby said, “Why is half the country paying for a channel that clearly despises them?

“The BBC doesn't care much about diversity. It's a myth. In fact, they are anti-diversity. You only work with people who share the same worldview. "

Talk Radio host Kevin O & # 39; Sullivan wrote: & # 39; Roadkill: a thrilling new BBC drama about an evil Tory minister looking to privatize the NHS.

"Nice to see the state broadcaster plowing an unexpected furrow and escaping the shackles of its left-wing prejudice …"

And a third viewer, Oliver Bayley, wrote: “The BBC continues to build its own coffin. This time with the help of David Hare's childlike tribalism and his intellectually arrested development. Makes a ladybug book look nuanced. & # 39;

MailOnline has asked the BBC for a comment.

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