ENTERTAINMENT

The BBC was involved in the racing series after Carol's from King's show


The BBC was involved in the series after Carols "did not show ethnic minorities" on King's show.

  • BBC 2 aired Carols from King & # 39; s College, Cambridge on Christmas Eve
  • None of the 13 singers on the program were from ethnic minorities
  • The choristers were all selected from their school, King & # 39; s College, Cambridge

Viewers complained to the BBC after Carols From King & # 39; s didn't have a single non-white choir in their festive service.

None of the 13 singers on the program that aired on BBC2 on Christmas Eve appeared to be from an ethnic minority.

The choristers were selected by their school, King's College, Cambridge University.

A viewer told The Mail on Sunday: “All of the young choir singers were white. I have mixed grandchildren and I was appalled.

Viewers complained to the BBC after none of the Christmas Eve & # 39; Carols from King & # 39; s & # 39; involved choristers appeared to have a non-white heritage

"I can't believe King's College School doesn't have black students who can sing."

A spokesman for King & # 39; s said the cast changed after some of the singers were forced to self-isolate due to the coronavirus.

"King & # 39; s College is a diverse community whose commitment to equal access and wider participation is reflected in all aspects of college life," they said.

"Unfortunately, the college's diversity was not reflected on the television service as some attendees had to self-isolate after testing positive for Covid-19 shortly before filming began."

The BBC said one of the adults shown on the service was of Japanese origin.

Carols From King’s has become a traditional and popular part of the BBC's festive coverage, beginning in 1954 as an offshoot of the longer A Festival of Lessons and Carols service.

The Cambridge Independent reported that the two choir scholars who were supposed to attend the Christmas carols recorded in early December had to drop out after testing positive for Covid-19.

As a result, six of The King & # 39; s Singers, an internationally known vocal group made up of Cambridge graduates, received a call and filled their seats within 48 hours.

Rev. Dr. Stephen Cherry, Dean of King & # 39; s College, said, "We are all very grateful to the King & # 39; s Singers for stepping up at the last minute.

"The King & # 39; s College Choir has been preparing for our Christmas shows for months, following strict security protocols, so it was particularly disappointing that the choir scholars couldn't be there while we were shooting."

2020 was also the first time that the service was recorded without a congregation.

A viewer told The Mail on Sunday: “All of the young choir singers were white. I have mixed grandchildren and I was appalled. I can't believe King's College School doesn't have black students who can sing.

A viewer told The Mail on Sunday: “All of the young choir singers were white. I have mixed grandchildren and I was appalled. I can't believe King's College School doesn't have black students who can sing.

advertising