ENTERTAINMENT

The BBC is marking Brexit with left-wing comedians comparing withdrawal from the EU to cancer


BBC broadcasters and presenters launched a bitter attack on Brexit during the New Year's plan.

The UK's long-awaited exit from the European Union on Thursday coincided with what critics described as bad-tempered tirades, offensive remarks and heavily biased reports in the company's end-of-year programming.

Among those who made comments, apparently aimed at the 17.4 million people who voted for vacation, were comedians Nish Kumar and Frankie Boyle.

Nish Kumar appearing on Graham Norton's New Years Eve Special (the show can be seen above with Graham Norton)

Kumar, who hosts the BBC Two satire show The Mash Report, delivered his shame while appearing on Graham Norton's New Years Eve special.

The 35-year-old first described longtime Brexit activist Nigel Farage as "a sack of meat brought to life by a witch's curse" and added: "Now that we have finally closed Brexit, we are likely to feel like it walk." Things and will vote to leave behind more stuff, from the continent of Europe to the United Nations to Earth by strapping rockets under the country and blasting them into space. & # 39;

Later on the show, Norton Kumar showed a picture of Boris Johnson and his fiancée Carrie Symonds and said, "I can't believe this person is now running the country and standing next to Boris Johnson."

For his part, Boyle, who hosted a New Years edition of his BBC Two show Frankie Boyles New World Order, said, "A Brexit at the end of a year like this is like finding out that your cancer has spread to your walls house."

He added that "sooner or later the British – admittedly as refugees – will return to Europe".

Kumar, who hosts the BBC Two satire show The Mash Report, delivered his shame while appearing on Graham Norton's New Years Eve special

Kumar, who hosts the BBC Two satire show The Mash Report, delivered his shame while appearing on Graham Norton's New Years Eve special

The anti-Brexit issue has also made its mark on the BBC's Breaking The News of Scotland, which is available to viewers across the UK via the iPlayer service. Presenter Des Clarke closed the show's annual recap by joking that those unable to attend next year's planned Brexit festival can recreate the experience at home by "humming the national anthem while stomping on a croissant" .

The new dispute over the BBC's approach to Brexit comes just four months after its new CEO Tim Davie said he wanted to "strike a better balance between satirical goals rather than joking the Tories all the time".

It wasn't just the BBC comedy stars who were pessimistic about the new trade deal with the EU – news correspondents also seemed to be grappling with fears of more bureaucracy and business damage. On the New Year's edition of Today on BBC Radio 4, business editor Simon Jack spoke of companies facing a “mountain of new papers” if they want to export to the EU.

In a bulletin on his news channel on the same day, “bureaucracy” was identified as one of the consequences of the new deal, while political editor Laura Kuenssberg pointed out additional documents when questioning Boris Johnson last Wednesday.

Frankie Boyle, who hosted a New Year's edition of his BBC Two show Frankie Boyle's New World Order, said, "A Brexit at the end of a year like this is like finding out that your cancer has spread to the walls of your home."

Frankie Boyle, who hosted a New Year's edition of his BBC Two show Frankie Boyle's New World Order, said, "A Brexit at the end of a year like this is like finding out that your cancer has spread to the walls of your home."

On the newscast's podcast, she said, “There's a very, very, very long list of new types of paperwork that go into effect for all types of business, whether it's filling out customs forms or doing various kinds of extra paperwork if you can want to take your pet with you on vacation. & # 39;

On the same podcast, Katya Adler, the BBC's Europe editor who has been accused of being for Remain, added, "It is not true that there are no trade disruptions."

Last night, London Assembly Member Peter Whittle, Director of the New Culture Forum, said: "It is no great surprise that the BBC is losing the public's trust. It is barely able to contain its hostility to Brexit and people have become wise.

“In all major issues such as Brexit and immigration, it contradicts the majority in the country. And yet they have to pay for it. "

A BBC spokesman said last night: "The BBC is impartial on all issues and always offers different perspectives – our Brexit coverage was no different."

No wonder half of the British think that the national broadcaster does not share their values

By Chris Hastings for the Sunday Mail

Almost half of Britons believe the BBC no longer shares their values, according to a new poll.

Research by YouGov has found that 44 percent of the public think the company is holding their views badly.

Forty-eight percent of older voters and 58 percent of those who voted to leave the European Union were unhappy with their general stance.

The research, conducted on behalf of The Times, found that only four percent of respondents felt that the BBC's scores had become more similar to those of the BBC, while 33 percent said they had become less similar to theirs.

Older male viewers outside London and the South East were most likely to be dissatisfied with the levels perceived by the BBC. The results come at a particularly sensitive time for the BBC. In November, the government opened the final round of license fee negotiations, calling on the BBC to bid for the amount of the fee from 2022.

Ministers have also set up a ten-person panel to look into the long-term future of public service broadcasting in the UK, leading to speculation that the license fee in its current form could be abolished altogether.

Sir Robbie Gibb, a former No. 10 communications director appointed to the panel, told The Times: "These results show why the BBC Director General Tim Davie is right to make improving impartiality his No. 1 priority . "

Roger Mosey, former head of BBC Television News, said: “The BBC is more geared towards a metropolitan and liberal audience than the rest of the country. On the positive side, I'm sure Tim Davie is on the case.

"For me, a real shift to centers outside London and a much deeper understanding of the audience would be high on the agenda."

Ex-BBC manager David Elstein, who later started Channel 5, said, "If people don't believe you are impartial and don't believe you hold their views or their culture, it will end up being very difficult to keep the BBC up to date Financing model. & # 39;

The new YouGov results are believed to be in line with private research by the BBC showing the company is valued more highly by residents in affluent and more diverse neighborhoods.

A BBC spokesman said last night: “Recent research shows that people are still connected to our core mission of informing, educating and entertaining, and that our goals remain relevant.

“Lately, over 90 percent of people are using our services every week. We are particularly valued because we do not represent any party political positions.

"However, the Director-General has made it very clear that the BBC must work hard to have a very broad segment of views to ensure that we continue to expand the number of perspectives in our output."

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