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The 70-year-old woman with dementia describes the “torture” of a lack of visits during the Covid 19 crisis


Charities warn that care home residents are “rapidly deteriorating” due to lack of social interaction, as a heartbroken woman said her husband's dementia had gotten “100 times worse” during the crisis.

Jean Haste, 70, from Suffolk, has announced that she could only see Trevor, 75, who has dementia, in his nursing home for 30 minutes once a week due to visiting restrictions in the Covid-19 crisis.

Calling the restrictions "torture of the heart," she said the period had affected her husband's illness "heavily" and told the BBC, "It affected his illness a hundred times." He is bent over in his wheelchair and I hardly get any eye contact. & # 39;

Said government rules need to change to cater for dementia sufferers, Jean said, “Every dementia patient should have a key person, a loved one, to go in, take the test, become a key worker, a caregiver and do the things I want to do with Trevor. & # 39;

Meanwhile, charities told FEMAIL that the restrictions had left carers and relatives "devastated" and "desperate" as they watched loved ones deteriorate during the crisis.

Jacqueline Cannon, executive director of the Lewy Body Society, said: "We have heard from many caregivers of people with Lewy body dementia that their loved ones have deteriorated during the pandemic, with a lack of visits cited as a key factor."

"We urge these rules on visits to be extra sensitive towards the end of life and to consider the holistic needs of people with dementia and their caregivers when taking protective measures to keep the virus out of our nursing homes."

Jean Haste, 70, from Suffolk, said her husband Trevor's illness was 100 times worse than when the lockdown started because he had limited social interactions

Trevor has dementia and now lives in a nursing home. Jean announces that she would be hanging out with her husband on a regular basis prior to the pandemic.

She said: “At the time he was still able to support himself, but I like to eat with him.

“I would play music, paint, sing, cut his nails, cut his hair. Do so much for him because he was still there. & # 39;

Jean revealed that despite his illness, they continued to have meaningful and intimate moments together, saying, “Before he went home, we went to a well-being group. Knowing Trevor couldn't speak, but we sang a song.

The 70-year-old said the pandemic was "agony of the heart" because she could only see her husband for 30 minutes each week

The 70-year-old said the pandemic was "agony of the heart" because she could only see her husband for 30 minutes each week

"It was called" If you don't say anything at all "and we come to the line:" There is a truth in your eyes that says that you will never leave me. The touch of your hand says that if I fall you will catch me. "

& # 39; And he reached over and touched me. And that is the power of touch. It meant so much to him because he couldn't tell me, but he could touch me. & # 39;

Visiting hours for Trevor's nursing home were limited, however. The guests were asked to stay two meters away from the residents.

Jean said, “I call it torture of the heart. I made a vow and it was to be had and to be kept. And I can't be with him. It means to hold, I am not allowed to hold him. & # 39;

WHAT IS DEMENTIA? THE MURILLARY DISEASE ROBS SUFFERS FROM HER MEMORIES

Dementia is an umbrella term that describes a range of neurological disorders

Dementia is an umbrella term that describes a range of neurological disorders

A global concern

Dementia is an umbrella term that describes a series of progressive neurological disorders (affecting the brain) that affect memory, thinking, and behavior.

There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer's disease is the most common.

Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.

Regardless of the type diagnosed, each person experiences their dementia in their own way.

Dementia is a global problem, but it is most common in more affluent countries, where people are likely to live into old age.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE AFFECTED?

The Alzheimer's Society reports that there are more than 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, of whom more than 500,000 have Alzheimer's.

It is estimated that the number of people with dementia in the UK will exceed 1 million by 2025.

It is estimated that 5.5 million people have Alzheimer's disease in the United States. A similar percentage increase is expected in the coming years.

The risk of developing dementia increases with age.

Diagnosis rates are improving, but it is believed that many people with dementia are still undiagnosed.

IS THERE A CURE?

There is currently no cure for dementia.

But new drugs can slow the progression, and the sooner they're discovered, the more effective the treatments are.

Source: Alzheimer's Society

Jean had nothing but praise for the nursing home but said that government rules need to change to cater to people with dementia. & # 39;

She said she just wanted to & # 39; be with him & # 39; and said: & # 39; He took care of me, he worked hard, gave us a good life, a good home. And now I don't feel with him. He is alone. & # 39;

The Department of Health and Welfare said its "first priority" is preventing infections in nursing homes, but local health officials are "responsible for visiting policy".

Jacqueline, executive director of Lewy Body Society, which raises awareness of Lewy body dementia, the second most common type of dementia in the elderly, said, “We have heard from many caregivers of people with Lewy body dementia that their loved ones sick has worsened during the pandemic, with lack of visits cited as a key factor.

Before the crisis, Jean said she spent time with her husband playing music, singing, and cutting her hair

Before the crisis, Jean said she spent time with her husband playing music, singing, and cutting her hair

Changes to procedures and staff in hospitals have also disrupted care arrangements that are tailored to the condition of the person with Lewy body dementia, a complex and fluctuating condition with symptoms both physical and cognitive.

“Changing routines and a lack of consistent care can be a major challenge for people with dementia. The need to protect our older generation from COVID should be weighed against the negative effects of lack of access to family members and other caregivers towards the end of a person's life.

“The impact on caregivers is devastating and many of them will live with acute fear that they will never see their mother or father again.

"We urge these rules on visits to be extra sensitive towards the end of life and to consider the holistic needs of people with dementia and their caregivers when taking protective measures to keep the virus out of our nursing homes."

While she is full of praise for Trevor's nursing home, Jean said the state restrictions have seriously affected his health

While she is full of praise for Trevor's nursing home, Jean said the state restrictions have seriously affected his health

Meanwhile, Dementia UK told FEMAIL that they have received a large number of calls from families desperately looking for relatives during the time of crisis.

Paul Edwards, Director of Clinical Services at Dementia UK, said: “We want protocols to be adopted for safe nursing home visits. Our Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline hears from a significant number of families who have been unable to visit relatives.

“Seeing relatives in person and providing inspiration and connections with the outside world can be a crucial buffer against the progressive nature of the disease and is an integral part of caring for the person.

“People in care are some of the most vulnerable groups in society, with a large number of people living in this setting with dementia.

"As we enter the winter months with fears of mounting pressures, an integrated system between the NHS, social service providers and local authorities, led by clear, safe and compassionate governance, is of the utmost priority."

During the emotional interview, Jean said she had problems because she couldn't keep her husband despite her marriage vows

During the emotional interview, Jean said she had problems because she couldn't keep her husband despite her marriage vows

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