ENTERTAINMENT

The 61-year-old BP vice president hanged himself in his £ 2 million home


British Petroleum's vice president hanged himself in his £ 2 million home a week after being fired, a coroner heard today.

The 61-year-old newly wed Nick Spencer was found dead in his luxury home where he was living in Buckinghamshire with his wife Eve in April.

His investigation found that he had been working for oil giant BP for a decade when he was forced to leave the company on March 31 this year.

After being told of the redundancy, the successful dad of two became depressed and worried about managing his finances, Eve told the coroner.

In a statement she said: “He has been depressed since he was released.

The newly wed Nick Spencer (pictured), 61, was found dead in his luxury home where he was living in Buckinghamshire with his wife Eve in April

His investigation found that he had been working for oil giant BP for a decade when he was forced to leave the company on March 31 this year. Pictured his home in Buckinghamshire

His investigation found that he had been working for oil giant BP for a decade when he was forced to leave the company on March 31 this year. Pictured his home in Buckinghamshire

“He was looking for a new job and I felt it had a positive effect, but there was an oil crisis due to Covid-19 and he was concerned about rescheduling the house and finances.

The time before his death, he looked a little more depressed, and it was the 12th anniversary of a family bereavement.

The successful father of two children (pictured) became depressed

The successful father of two children (pictured) became depressed

The night before he died, we watched the news and went to bed. We talked on television and he got to bed at 2am which was unusually late.

He got up at 6:40 a.m. on April 7th. He was usually an early riser and I went back to sleep. I later went into the study and saw the letters he had written. I opened the one addressed to me and called the police, I was very worried. & # 39;

The first policeman to arrive at Beaconsfield, Bucks, discovered that Mr. Spencer was hanging in the house's garage. Eve identified the body as her husband at 10:30 a.m.

The pathologist Dr. Steven Corrigan confirmed the cause of death as hanging.

After graduating from Harvard Business School in 1999, Mr. Spencer became General Manager of European Refining and ran three refineries across Europe.

He worked at ConocoPhillips for the next seven years and was tasked with building the business in the MENA region.

In October 2009 he moved to British Petroleum (BP) as head of the business unit and worked for the largest refinery in the USA for the next five years.

Following his great success, he was elected Vice President of Global Refining in November 2014, where he managed 7,500 employees with a gross margin of $ 6 billion.

He remained in that position until he was released in March of that year.

After graduating from Harvard Business School in 1999, Mr. Spencer (who is making a chocolate cake to celebrate the completion of a project) became General Manager of European Refining and ran three refineries across Europe

After graduating from Harvard Business School in 1999, Mr. Spencer (who is making a chocolate cake to celebrate the completion of a project) became General Manager of European Refining and ran three refineries across Europe

In a report of the investigation, a psychiatrist confirmed that he had seen Mr. Spencer on January 18, where he warned that he was no longer employed, said he had had suicidal thoughts for a while and even had a plan in mind.

He shared the symptoms of his release and built his children's regrets and thoughts. He spoke about the cost of pain caused by some of his actions.

"I felt that the protective element in relation to his family was preventing him from creating thoughts of suicide," added the psychiatrist.

Following the January appointment, Mr. Spencer refused to follow up and canceled his appointed appointments.

Buckinghamshire coroner, Crispin Butler, sat in Beaconsfield and said, “Many weeks had passed, but the reality of it was all that time the job was ending.

Mr Spencer is pictured with Olympic long jump record holder Bob Beamon. In October 2009 he moved to British Petroleum (BP) as the head of the business unit and worked for the largest refinery in the USA for the next five years

Mr Spencer is pictured with Olympic long jump record holder Bob Beamon. In October 2009 he moved to British Petroleum (BP) as head of the business unit and worked for the largest refinery in the USA for the next five years

“Saying goodbye to people he worked with but not in the way you'd hoped because he couldn't have a farewell party and the physical element of taking his IT equipment off his home address had affected him.

& # 39; It appears that his depression, job loss, personality, financial uncertainty, debt restructuring, an element of social anxiety, and lifelong privacy have all affected him.

& # 39; The changes in Nick's life were amplified in the notes he wrote. It wasn't something he had done to demonstrate that he was calling for help, it was his choice. You can see the evolution of the processes as he reacted to the end of his work. & # 39;

Upon investigation, he recorded a suicide sentence in which the destroyed sons Robert and Richard Spencer of Mr. Spencer participated.

After Mr Spencer lost his job, he feared he could no longer afford his £ 2million house in Buckinghamshire (pictured)

After Mr Spencer lost his job, he feared he could no longer afford his £ 2million house in Buckinghamshire (pictured)

Dozens of online honors came for the oil expert from former colleagues who fondly remembered his "calm" nature.

One of them, Mark Taylor, said in his post: “Nick recruited me for BP in 2010 and gave me tremendous support, capacity and accountability to deliver the various components of the project.

& # 39; Nick's personal contribution, leadership and calm shone through every day and without which the project could not have been implemented. I will forever remember your calm and determination with the sense of humor and fun that goes with it. & # 39;

John Finnegan wrote: “It was a pleasure knowing Nick and working for him. From our time at the Lake Charles Refinery to Ponca City to Humber, Nick has been the leader everyone wants to work for.

“If you worked for Nick, he would be your teacher, mentor and friend. It was his friendliness that I remember most. & # 39;

Bob Allendorfer added: “Having had most of the collaboration with and for Nick over the past 10 years, I look back on our time with fond memories and will continue it for many years.

& # 39; Nick's calm, systematic and longer-term approach provided the much-needed balance in turbulent times and was deeply appreciated by me and many others.

& # 39; It's clear to see where Nick shaped our business and, more importantly, its lasting impact on those who run it. Eva, Richard and Robert – my heart goes out to you. Nick was a good man. & # 39;

MailOnline asked BP for a comment.

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