ENTERTAINMENT

The 54-year-old man, whose penis was amputated after being diagnosed with cancer, is starting to rebuild it worldwide


A father of two has shown what it's like to live without a penis after being amputated for cancer – and claims that some women don't mind.

Richard Stamp, 54, from London, who has worked as an actor and clown for over 20 years, was in Cambodia when he discovered a lump on his penis in 2018.

Although he was in pain for two months, he postponed medical treatment before he was finally diagnosed with penile cancer in Adelaide, Australia and was told to have his penis removed.

The 54-year-old, whose relationship fell apart after his penile amputation, is slated to feature in a new Channel 5 documentary, Shopping for A New Penis, as he embarks on a global search for ways to rebuild his organ.

He told The Mirror he was often asked if he could still have sex and revealed, “I was grateful I could still orgasm, but then I had to figure out how to do it with one partner and make my new one Share body with someone. But some women don't mind.

Richard Stamp, 54, from London, whose penis was amputated due to cancer, found out about his sex life and revealed that some women “don't mind”.

He appears in a new Channel 5 documentary documenting his journey around the world to explore ways to rebuild his penis

He appears in a new Channel 5 documentary documenting his journey around the world to explore ways to rebuild his penis

Richard remembered the moment he was told that his entire penis had been made by a doctor named Dr. Cox needs to be amputated (pictured in hospital).

Richard remembered the moment he was told that his entire penis had been made by a doctor named Dr. Cox needs to be amputated (pictured in hospital).

During the program, he discussed his struggles with ex-partner Angie and revealed that he and Angie had been together for two years before his cancer was discovered.

The 54-year-old, who has a son and daughter from a previous relationship, said he started avoiding sex before he was diagnosed because it caused him pain.

He stated that it "built up" over time and that the intrusion "really hurt" making him feel vulnerable.

Richard also remembered the moment he was told that his entire penis had been made by a doctor named Dr. Cox must be amputated.

Richard met with doctors around the world to examine the options available to him to rebuild his organ

Richard met with doctors around the world to examine the options available to him to rebuild his organ

The 54-year-old said he was grappling with the reality of losing his penis and admitted that he wondered who he was as a person

The 54-year-old said he was grappling with the reality of losing his penis and admitted that he wondered who he was as a person

WHAT IS PENIC CANCER?

Penile cancer is very rare. In the UK, 631 men are diagnosed with the disease each year.

It is most commonly diagnosed in men over the age of 60, but younger men can also be affected. Around 25 percent of cases are diagnosed in men under the age of 50.

However, according to Macmillan Cancer Support, only two men between the ages of 25 and 29 were diagnosed with penile cancer in 2016.

It is usually a slowly growing cancer. If it's detected early before it spreads further, the chances of survival are high and about 75 percent of men diagnosed with penile cancer will survive the disease.

Unfortunately, most men tend to ignore possible symptoms of penile cancer for some time, delaying diagnosis.

Symptoms can be:

  • A growth or ulcer on the penis, especially the glans or foreskin.
  • Changes in the color of the penis.
  • Thickening of the skin on the penis.
  • Persistent discharge with a foul smelling odor under the foreskin.
  • Blood comes from the tip of the penis or under the foreskin.
  • Unexplained pain in the shaft or tip of the penis.
  • Irregular or growing bluish-brown flat lesions or markings under the foreskin or on the body of the penis.
  • Reddish, velvety rash under the foreskin.
  • Small, crispy bumps under the foreskin.
  • Irregular swelling at the end of the penis.

Source: orchid

He said he met with a "terrifying" doctor who told him the news "very sharply" before showing him a model of a penis as if it were "some kind of farm animal".

He said he felt "very panicked" from the news, adding that the room was spinning when he heard about the surgery.

The 54-year-old added that hearing his penis need to be amputated was the "worst moment" of his life.

He got a second opinion at his local St. George & # 39; s Hospital in Tooting, the leading European medical institute for penile cancer.

Dr. However, Ben Ayres confirmed the worst, telling him that an amputation was necessary, but there was a way to save a tiny part of his penis.

Richard admitted that he was scared and said, "I remember before the operation and thought," I'm going to run away. "Then the realization is where I'm going to run? If I don't, I'll die.

"Maybe it sounds crazy if you're not a guy, but when you live without a penis you wonder who you are."

He went on to say that he was a "normal guy" until he heard he had to remove his penis.

He added that he was "really angry" now, letting the situation "get this far" and "feeling like a complete fool".

His trip around the world showed him what the world has to offer, from plastic penises to prosthetic ones.

However, he plans a rebuild that will take three 13-hour surgeries.

Doctors remove meat from his arm and buttocks to shape his penis before an implant is placed.

Then a pump is built into his scrotum to give him an erection with the push of a button.

He said it was "strange" and he still wants to feel like "not an object" or "something of Doctor Who".

He stated that he is going through a thoughtful process to prepare for surgery by taking things one week at a time.

Richard is now a spokesperson for the Orchid cancer charity for men and urges other men to learn from his mistakes.

He admitted that it is “inbreeding” for men to “be tough and not talk about things,” but cautioned others not to have something checked if something is wrong.

Shopping For A New Penis is on Channel 5 on Thursday at 10 p.m.

What is penile reconstruction?

Reconstruction of the penis poses a multitude of complex problems that often require not only surgical intervention, but also psychological rehabilitation.

The goal of penile reconstruction is to create and / or restore a functioning and aesthetically pleasing phallus, including the ability to achieve sexual functions.

An important factor is that the reconstructed phallus resembles a normal penis in all aspects.

In a phalloplasty, doctors surgically create or recreate a penis.

Phalloplastics have come a long way since the first was done in 1936.

Doctors harvest flaps of tissue – usually from the forearm, sometimes from the thigh – to create the new exterior and urethra of the penis. Therefore, this donor area needs to be treated Laser hair removal on the "donor area" that becomes the penis looks realistic and hairless.

Then the operation is done in four steps, sometimes separately, others in a long operation lasting between eight and 12 hours.

Surgeons remove the donor tissue from the forearm (or other location), then aAnother skin graft, typically taken from the thigh, is then used to cover the forearm donor site.

Then surgeons build the penis and urethra and connect them to the bladder.

In the fourth phase, most patients have a doctor insert a pump into the shaft of a penis that is attached to a prosthetic testicle and a saline bag stowed in the abdomen.

With this system, the patient can squeeze the testicle and pump the saline solution into their new penis to help them get an erection.

The operation is extensive and complex. Most patients spend about a week in the hospital after surgery.

It takes approximately six weeks to be able to do strenuous activity or heavy lifting and 12 to 118 months to heal completely.

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