ENTERTAINMENT

The 20-year-old son of a BooHoo CEO, valued at £ 1.6m a year, was found dead in the family home at £ 1.9m


Boohoo's CEO's son, worth £ 1.6 million a year, was found dead in his bed after overdosing on morphine ten days before his 21st birthday during the ban.

20-year-old Louis Lyttle, whose father is the head of fast fashion chain John Lyttle, died in the family's £ 1.9m villa near Sevenoaks, Kent.

He was found to be unresponsive and not breathing after not getting up to work at 5 a.m. on Monday, April 20. Louis, who was said to have worked for his father at Boohoo in the marketing department, was pronounced dead by paramedics at 6:20 a.m.

An investigation into his death by Mr. Lyttle was opened in the county hall in Maidstone, Kent, with the cause of death reported as morphine toxicity. It is not known why he took the strong pain reliever.

He is survived by his parents John and Clodagh, who met in their home country Ireland when they worked as buyers for Primark in Dublin in the 1990s, and his two sisters Laura and Kate.

A family friend in Galway, where Louis was born, said to MailOnline today: “We are all devastated to hear that this happened to their beautiful son Louis. We had heard that he died during the ban, but had no idea of ​​the circumstances. It’s just so sad. & # 39;

According to his LinkedIn profile, Louis was a former student at King’s School in Canterbury for £ 27,000 a year, studied business administration at Cardiff University and also worked at Boohoo since July last year.

His father, a marathon enthusiast who ran Primark before moving to Boohoo in 2019, is taking the train from Sevenoaks to the company's headquarters in Manchester to work the week, and his son, a digital marketer, is likely to be regular with him traveled.

Mr Lyttle has recently addressed a crisis in Boohoo because it has been alleged that clothing for the fast fashion company in Leicester sweatshirts was made during the entire lockout period by employees who were just £ 3.50 an hour below the minimum wage and paid without adequate PPE.

Louis Lyttle, the son of the boss of fast fashion chain John Lyttle, died in April after an overdose near Sevenoaks

Louis Lyttle, 20, the son of the boss of the fast fashion chain, John Lyttle, died at home near Sevenoaks in April after an overdose of morphine, an investigation has heard

Mr. Lyttle died in the family's £ 1.9m villa (pictured) near the stockbroker town of Sevenoaks in Kent

Mr. Lyttle died in the family's £ 1.9m villa (pictured) near the stockbroker town of Sevenoaks in Kent

According to LinkedIn, Louis works for Boohoo and was found unresponsive after not getting up to work

According to LinkedIn, Louis works for Boohoo and was found unresponsive after not getting up to work

A full hearing on Louis’s death has now been adjourned until September 24, coroner Alan Blunsdon said.

Louis was born in Galway, Ireland and confirmed his job as a digital marketer at Boohoo. Previously, he worked as an intern at LinkedIn for the banking company Investec and the health insurers Religare.

"The richest shopkeeper you've never heard of": Who is John Lyttle, CEO of Boohoo?

John Lyttle, 51, was born in Ireland and came to Primark after completing school.

Irish-born Lyttle worked in Dublin, where he met his future wife Clodagh, who also worked for the company in the 1990s.

He rose to the role of Purchasing Manager before joining the Arcadia Group under Sir Philip Green as Purchasing Manager in the UK.

Mr. Lyttle then worked for Matalan as a commercial director for five years before returning to Primark in 2010.

In his role as chief operating officer, he oversaw the sales rocket to over £ 7 billion.

When he was appointed Boohoo's chief executive, his chief executive Mahmud Kamani said he was "thrilled" to have him on board.

He recently described himself as an avid runner in an interview, but showed the extent of his ambitions with the clothing company.

Mr. Lyttle said: “We may have started in the UK market. But what we really want to be is really a global player. "

But he had to deal with a number of scandals in his first year at work.

The police were called in to inspect factories that Boohoo in Leicester was supposed to use to manufacture his inexpensive clothing during the pandemic.

The staff were paid well below the minimum wage and reportedly did not receive the latest PSA.

Mr. Lyttle has opened an investigation into what happened in Leicester.

His father John, who had been Primark's chief operating officer for a decade after taking on top jobs at Matalan and the Arcadia Group from Sir Philip Green, declined to comment on his son's death.

He started in retail after leaving school in Ireland and came to Primark as a trainee branch manager. His main hobby is running and he has completed six marathons.

Mr. Lyttle is married to Clodagh from Kilworth, County Cork. They met when they both worked as buyers for Primark in Dublin in the 1990s.

When he climbed the career ladder, they moved to the UK before returning to Primark headquarters in Dublin for a second stay when he was on the board.

A former colleague said Lyttle was known as a "silent assassin" when he worked for Primark, as a large part of his job to fire people.

"But one on one he was a very nice guy. He and Clodagh are a nice couple and very strong together, ”he said.

When asked whether the Louis family wanted to pay tribute, a woman answered today on the intercom at the entrance gate: "No comment".

The Lyttle family lives in Sevenoaks, Kent, one of the UK's richest commuter cities, known for its green streets full of mansions of merchants, bankers, lawyers and other highly paid professionals who work in London.

It also has a number of prominent residents, including Gloria Hunniford.

Mr. Lyttle was forced to initiate a review of the company's UK supply chain after alleging that clothing made for Boohoo in Leicester sweatshirts was made by employees paid below the minimum wage during the ban.

Boohoo wiped more than £ 1.3 billion off its stock value in two days this month when retailers like Next and Asos dropped their clothes off their websites.

He was brought to Boohoo in March 2019 and is said to have raised nearly £ 1.6m annually for this role.

The Offaly-born manager has a salary of £ 615,000, but his contract also provides for an annual bonus of up to £ 900,000. Another £ 50 million bonus will be offered if it can increase the company's value from £ 2 billion to £ 5 billion.

But Boohoo's share price fell £ 1.40 to £ 2.66 after being hit by the Leicester Sweat Shop scandal.

At the beginning of the ban, there was further suffering for the company that Mahmud Kamani founded in Manchester.

Employees, including models, photographers, makeup artists, and stylists, were asked to come to work after their superiors said it was "business as usual," a whistleblower claimed. According to a source, those who stayed away threatened to cut wages.

An insider told the telegraph: “Boohoo advised employees to adhere to the two-meter separation rule.

“However, due to the nature of the work, this is not possible.

"The company is still profit-making and doesn't stand with the rest of the country to lower the infection rate."

Louis was a former student at King’s School in Canterbury, studied business administration at Cardiff University, and has also worked at Boohoo since July last year.

Louis was a former student at King’s School in Canterbury, studied business administration at Cardiff University, and has also worked at Boohoo since July last year.

Louis was a former student at King’s School in Canterbury, studied business administration at Cardiff University, and has also worked at Boohoo since July last year

Louis, who allegedly worked for his father John (picture) in Boohoo, was declared dead by paramedics on April 20 at 6:20 p.m.

Louis, who allegedly worked for his father John (picture) in Boohoo, was declared dead by paramedics on April 20 at 6:20 p.m.

Although the company has already stated that it has found no evidence of the low hourly payment, it has confirmed that two of its suppliers have not complied with the code of conduct. Your contracts have now been canceled.

Some workers in the Leicester factory reportedly received £ 3.50 an hour – well below the minimum wage of £ 8.72 for people aged 25 and over – and at the same time offered no protection against coronavirus.

Mr. Lyttle said that the allegations, if any, are "totally unacceptable" and promised to take action.

He has initiated an "immediate and independent" review of the company's UK supply chain and also plans to build a "model factory" to ensure that workers are treated fairly.

In addition, Mr. Lyttle wrote to Home Secretary Priti Patel asking the government to set up a licensing system for textile manufacturers based in the UK.

The National Crime Agency is investigating the city's clothing industry and has visited premises to investigate "concerns about modern slavery and human trafficking."

Boohoo sources much of its clothing from Leicester.

Interior Minister Priti Patel described the allegations against fast fashion suppliers in the city as "really appalling" and promised action.

Factory workers at Faiza Fashion in Leicester - where supposedly Boohoo and PLT clothing are made - operate their sewing machines despite the risk of getting Covid-19

Factory workers at Faiza Fashion in Leicester – where supposedly Boohoo and PLT clothing are made – operate their sewing machines despite the risk of getting Covid-19

"Employees who work in sweatshirts during the blockade, workers who paid below the minimum wage and were fined for smiling": scandals that rocked the fast-fashion giant Boohoo

Boohoo has become a fashion phenomenon – now valued at £ 3 billion, but has been hit by a number of scandals in the past few years on its way to becoming one of the UK's most popular brands.

Last month, the fast fashion brand came under fire after an article claimed that workers in a Leicester factory that made clothing for the company only paid £ 3.50 an hour.

According to the report, the factory where the Jaswal fashion signage was installed continued to operate during the local coronavirus lockout without additional health measures being taken.

In 2018, a Financial Times survey found evidence of dangerous working conditions, undisclosed subcontracts, and people paid below the minimum wage.

In 2017, Boohoo.com employees reportedly risked being fired for smiling or checking their phones. This was the result of an investigation by Channel 4.

Boohoo founder Mahmud Kamani, pictured right, next to his son Umar, who helped them build Pretty Little Thing. Your supply chains and working conditions have been checked

Boohoo founder Mahmud Kamani, pictured right, next to his son Umar, who helped them build Pretty Little Thing. Your supply chains and working conditions have been checked

The terms are an open secret, or rather Leicester's "dirty secret", and have been investigated by dispatchers.

They found that factories manufacturing clothing for River Island, New Look, Boohoo and Missguided only paid workers £ 3 an hour under conditions that did not meet health and safety standards.

John Lyttle, CEO of Boohoo, pictured in LA last year, promised a £ 50m bonus in 2019 if he could add value to the company by 2023

John Lyttle, CEO of Boohoo, pictured in LA last year, promised a £ 50m bonus in 2019 if he could add value to the company by 2023

An investigation by Parliament's Human Rights Commission three years ago found that between one third and three quarters of those working in these factories were paid below the minimum wage and worked in unsafe environments.

Most come from ethnic minorities, with around 33.6 percent born outside the UK.

In the Kieron Hardman program, a former Boohoo team leader claimed: "In one case, I received an email asking if I could hit someone because someone was smiling."

Liana Wood, a labor lawyer, said of the undercover coverage: "If this person is 1 minute late and has to work 14 minutes unpaid, it may be an unauthorized deduction from wages."

The charity Labor Behind the Label has accused Boohoo of not doing enough to monitor conditions at the Leicester factories.

The retailer said he would review the claims, but insisted that he "followed and complied with all aspects of the (government) guidance."

Boohoo was founded in 2006 by Mahmud Kamani and Carol Kane and the company is now worth more than £ 3 billion.

Before Boohoo entered the ever-growing fast fashion scene, its owner, Mr. Kamani (55), sold handbags at the dealership.

He recognized the potential of internet sales and founded his online retailer in 2006 with the aim of offering his own branded fashion at rock-bottom prices.

The company started with just three employees and worked in a warehouse in Manchester.

. (tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) messages