TECHNOLOGY

The 19-year-old talented teenager wins a $ 40,000 scholarship to play soccer at Florida Tech


A teenage boy who was born in prison and spent the first 14 years of his life jumping from nursing home to nursing home before he was finally adopted received a $ 40,000 scholarship to study at Florida Tech .

Talented football player Nyre Handy [19] brought his adoptive parents to tears when he signed his letter of intent to play for the college team after first picking up a ball five years ago.

And her pride was doubled when Handy won the Southwest Florida Community Foundation's Patricia Means Fellowship, which is used for his tuition.

The path to the scholarship turned out to be difficult, but his parents Amal-Brenal and Bill Kibler stood by him all the way.

Talented football player Nyre Handy [19] brought his adoptive parents to tears when he signed his letter of intent to play for the college team after first picking up a ball five years ago

And her pride was doubled when Handy won the Southwest Florida Community Foundation's Patricia Means Fellowship, which is used for his tuition

And her pride was doubled when Handy won the Southwest Florida Community Foundation's Patricia Means Fellowship, which is used for his tuition

"I came out of nowhere and had nothing. It is difficult to say that I won a $ 40,000 scholarship," said Handy when he received the award this week.

"They [my parents] knew I had what it took to win the scholarship and they were just very proud of me," Handy told NBC2.

To win the scholarship, the 19-year-old submitted essays that were reviewed by moderators who ultimately decided that he deserved the most lucrative award.

“I was in survival mode the longest. Avoiding things like hassle, finding the next meal, I would say anything, ”said Handy, who lived in six different nursing homes before his youth.

The path to the scholarship turned out to be difficult, but his parents Amal-Brenal and Bill Kibler stood by him all the way.

When he was finally adopted, the test shows that his academic skills were in eighth grade, although he was three grades higher at his age.

They struggled to put him in tenth grade so that he had time to develop and then give him the opportunity to do sports again – which normally restrained students are not allowed to do.

"I was crying when he signed his letter of intent because I know what he got over," said Bill on the day of the emotional signing. While his mother assured him that he would always have a home with them no matter where he studied

"I was crying when he signed his letter of intent because I know what he got over," his father Bill said about the day of the emotional signing. While his mother assured him that he would always have a home with them no matter where he studied.

Handy also had a strong message for people with similarly disadvantaged backgrounds: “Never let anyone tell you that you can't do something because I've been told that a million times, and it's definitely not true.

& # 39; Never give up your dreams. So never give up your dreams, keep working hard, keep working hard, and just don't stop. & # 39;