ENTERTAINMENT

The 15-year-old dies of sepsis after a rare disease in which her ovaries twisted


A young girl who lit the room and dreamed of becoming a teacher died of sepsis caused by a rare condition in which her ovaries twisted.

Fifteen-year-old Paige Jacobsen of Prescot, Merseyside, became seriously ill while developing an infection caused by ovarian torsion, a painful condition that cuts blood supply to organs.

Paige was rushed to Whiston Hospital in the early hours of December 3rd because she felt uncomfortable at night.

She was ventilated while on the way to the hospital, but suffered two cardiac arrests.

However, when she was taken to Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool, she had a third cardiac arrest and tragically died shortly before midnight.

Family friends have now set up a GoFundMe page to help cover Paige's funeral expenses.

Fifteen-year-old Paige Jacobsen of Prescot, Merseyside, became seriously ill while developing an infection caused by ovarian torsion, a painful condition that cuts blood supply to organs. She died of sepsis after the sudden condition

Symptoms of ovarian torsion can include nausea, pelvic pain, vomiting, fever, and abnormal bleeding.

Although Paige did not complain of pain and had regular periods, she developed an infection from her ovary, which then developed into sepsis.

Tragic Paige, a Prescot School student, has been described as "very intelligent" and reportedly "made everyone smile" when tributes were paid to her.

Her heartbroken parents, Leanne Jacobsen and Colin Atkinson, said in a joint statement: “We are preparing to bury our daughter, which we would never do.

Paige's family said she was heartbroken after her death and hopes to raise awareness about the disease

Paige's family said she was heartbroken after her death and hopes to raise awareness about the disease

What is ovarian torsion?

Ovarian torsion occurs when one or both ovaries twist around their ligaments.

It can cause severe pain and other symptoms as the ovary does not receive enough blood.

Tissue death, leading to sepsis, can occur if the blood restriction continues for too long.

Ovarian torsion, also known as "adnexal torsion", usually affects only one ovary.

Symptoms can include nausea, severe pelvic pain and vomiting, fever, and abnormal bleeding.

People between the ages of 20 and 40 can experience ovarian torsion, but it can happen to any woman of any age.

& # 39; We are heartbroken, our angel grew her wings so early.

“We loved Paige with all of our hearts and part of us died with her.

"She will be missed very much by the whole family."

They also hoped to raise awareness of the rare condition that had tragically taken Paige.

They urged people to investigate the condition and look out for early warning signs such as severe, sudden pain in the lower abdomen.

They added, "Any awareness raised to help other families learn about this condition, and even save one child, will be amazing."

Debbie Gladman, whose daughter Katie Blane was best friends with Paige, said, "She was just an amazing person for her age."

Debbie, 42, described Paige as her "fifth child" and said the teenager was "very smart".

Paige had enrolled to train hair and beauty after graduating from school, but also had higher education in her sights as she got older.

Debbie added, “She was very smart and very smart, but she never bragged about it. She just went in and carried on.

& # 39; She was fun and always happy. She would come into the room and automatically you would just feel happier if she were around. She was that kind of person.

The teenager is remembered as someone who "lit up" every room she was in and a "very smart" student

The teenager is remembered as someone who "lit up" every room she was in and a "very smart" student

A photo of Paige when she was younger. A GoFundMe page was set up by family friends to help cover the teen's funeral expenses

A photo of Paige when she was younger. A GoFundMe page was set up by family friends to help cover the teen's funeral expenses

“She would dance and not care who was watching, she would dance and sing on the way to school.

& # 39; She was just very sociable and full of life and she was really nice. She would let my daughter know if she was naughty to me and she was just so thoughtful.

"She and my daughter were very close, told each other everything and never argued."

Debbie set up a gofundme page for Paige's parents to help cover funeral expenses.

She added, "Paige wasn't even in pain, so there wasn't much warning and it was pretty scary. It's pretty rare and it's scary that it can happen to such a young person. & # 39;

Shocked teachers at Paige's school described her in a tearful tribute as "small but bigger than life in character".

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that is caused when the body releases chemicals to fight infection.

These chemicals damage the body's tissues and organs and can lead to shock, organ failure, and death.

Organ failure and death are more likely if sepsis is not detected early and treated immediately.

Sepsis infects an estimated 55,000 Australians each year and kills between 5,000 and 9,000, making it more than four times more lethal than the road toll.

Symptoms can look like stomach or flu and become fatal quickly.

The six main signs of something potentially fatal can be identified by the acronym "SEPSIS":

  • Blurred speech or confusion, lethargy, disorientation
  • Extreme tremors or muscle pain, fever or low temperature
  • Pressing a rash does not hide it
  • Severe breathlessness, rapid breathing
  • Inability to urinate for several hours
  • Blotchy or discolored skin

Children may also have convulsions or seizures, and a rash that doesn't fade when pressed – and more than 40 percent of cases occur in children under five.

Anyone who develops these symptoms should see a doctor urgently – and the doctors ask, "Could this be sepsis?"

Sepsis is a leading cause of preventable death, killing around 10,000 Australians each year

Sepsis is a leading cause of preventable death, killing around 10,000 Australians each year

The early symptoms of sepsis can easily be mistaken for milder conditions, making diagnosis difficult.

A high temperature (fever), chills and tremors, a fast heartbeat, and fast breathing are also indicators.

A patient can deteriorate quickly if the sepsis is overlooked early on. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment is vital – but this rarely happens.

In the early stages, sepsis can be mistaken for a chest infection, flu, or upset stomach.

It's most common and dangerous in older adults, pregnant women, children under one year old, people with chronic illnesses, or people with weakened immune systems.

The Prescot School said in a statement: "She was a fun, bubbly girl who easily brought joy to everyone around her.

& # 39; Not only was Paige very popular, she had so much talent and potential too.

“She worked hard in class and some of the work she produced in her photography class was particularly impressive.

Paige also had a mature mindset, which not only meant she could add some brilliant things to classroom discussions, but was also a very valued friend to so many people.

“To say Paige will leave a hole in our community is an understatement.

"She was always at the center of everything, Paige never wanted to miss an opportunity, and we will do everything we can to honor her memory."

The school said that counseling and support will be provided to staff and students affected by Paige's death.

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