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Tesla suffered a complete network outage that prevented drivers from connecting to cars through the mobile app


Tesla is down (and not just its share price!) The electric car maker has been hit by a complete network outage, preventing drivers from being able to connect to their cars through a mobile app and banning employees from processing orders

  • Tesla was hit by a complete network outage starting at 11 a.m. ET
  • Internal systems have failed, so employees can no longer process orders
  • On the customer side, some users cannot connect to their car in the app
  • The US and Europe are having issues with the apparent app

It wasn't the best week for Tesla, the company lost $ 50 billion in market value yesterday and is suffering from a complete network outage today.

According to reports, Tesla's internal systems have failed and some customer connectivity features are not available in the mobile app.

The failure occurred around 11:00 a.m.CET. Some Tesla owners said they couldn't connect to their car through the app.

Sources told Electrek that Tesla's internal systems were also down, making it impossible to process deliveries and orders.

According to Down Detector, the failure extends across the United States and parts of Europe.

The failure occurred around 11:00 a.m.CET. Some Tesla owners said they couldn't connect to their car through the mobile app. According to Down Detector, the failure extends across the United States and parts of Europe

Frank Lambert, a Twitter user and Tesla owner, was the first to alert the outage.

& # 39; Tesla is currently experiencing a complete network outage. Internal systems have failed, according to sources. On the customer side, I cannot connect to one of my cars and the website does not work, ”said Lambert in a tweet.

Lambert, who has three Tesla vehicles, said on the social media site that he couldn't connect to the cars through the mobile app.

Other users interfered shortly afterwards, stating that they had the same problem.

Frank Lambert, a Twitter user and Tesla owner, was the first to alert the outage

Frank Lambert, a Twitter user and Tesla owner, was the first to alert the outage

Down Detector, a website that monitors outages online, shows that most outages are felt in the United States and in major cities like San Francisco, Boston, New York City, and Chicago.

The failure has crossed the Atlantic and hit parts of the UK, Germany and even Russia.

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