ENTERTAINMENT

Tesco is barricading "unnecessary" winter coats and children's clothing in the Streatham store


Tesco has prevented customers from buying winter coats and children's clothing by barricading items in one of its London stores that are considered "non-essential".

A photo taken at the store in Streatham, south London showed metal barricades blocking coats and clothing, among other things.

The scene was similar to that seen across Wales last month after the Welsh government ordered supermarkets to only sell goods they deemed "essential".

The measures had one man tearing off plastic sheeting covering "non-essential" goods in a Tesco store in Bangor, while another man in a store in Newport was wearing only his boxer shorts.

The photo in the Streatham Store was taken by an angry buyer who posted on Twitter. It came after England fell into national lockdown again last week.

Tesco has prevented customers from buying winter coats and children's clothing by barricading items in one of its London stores that are considered "non-essential". A photo taken at the store in Streatham, south London showed metal barricades blocking coats and clothing, among other things

The scene was similar to that seen across Wales last month after the Welsh government ordered supermarkets to only sell goods they deemed "essential". The measures had caused a man to tear off plastic sheeting covering "non-essential" goods in a Tesco store in Bangor

The scene was similar to that seen across Wales last month after the Welsh government ordered supermarkets to only sell goods they deemed "essential". The measures had caused a man to tear off plastic sheeting covering "non-essential" goods in a Tesco store in Bangor

The buyer wrote: “Disappointed that after the riot about blocking clothes, toys, housewares etc. in one of your stores in Wales, you have now done so at your Streatham Extra store.

"I can buy alcohol, but not a kettle or underwear."

A Tesco spokesperson responded on Twitter: “In accordance with new government guidelines in England requiring the closure of separate floors for non-food sales, we have closed the clothing and general merchandise departments in our stores, who sell these products from a separate mezzanine floor. & # 39;

Government guidance released Nov. 5 states, “If a business has sufficiently distinct parts and has a section of essential retail and a section of non-essential retail, the non-essential sections should be close to customer interactions and opportunity to limit the spread of the disease.

The buyer wrote: “Disappointed to see that after the riot of blocking clothes, toys, housewares etc. in one of your stores in Wales, you have now done so at your Streatham Extra store. I can buy alcohol, but not a kettle or underwear. & # 39;

The buyer wrote: “Disappointed to see that after the riot of blocking clothes, toys, housewares etc. in one of your stores in Wales, you have now done so at your Streatham Extra store. I can buy alcohol, but not a kettle or underwear. & # 39;

A Tesco spokesperson responded on Twitter: “In accordance with new government guidelines in England requiring the closure of separate floors for non-food sales, we have closed the clothing and general merchandise departments in our stores, who sell these products from a separate mezzanine floor

A Tesco spokesperson responded on Twitter: “In line with new government guidelines in England requiring the closure of separate floors for non-food sales, we have closed the clothing and general merchandise departments in our stores, who sell these products from a separate mezzanine floor

"For example, a grocery store can remain open, but a homeware area on a separate floor or building should be closed."

The photo came after similar measures by the Welsh government caused a stir across the country.

A 28-year-old man was charged with criminal harm and violating coronavirus regulations after plastic sheets were torn from "nonessential" goods in a Tesco store in Bangor.

A video posted on social media showed the man, not wearing a mask, shouting, "Since when have clothes been exempted? Tear off the fucks … kids who fuck clothes, it is." A shame. & # 39;

The photo came after similar measures by the Welsh government caused a stir across the country. Pictured: clothing taped in an Asda store in Cardiff last month

The photo came after similar measures by the Welsh government caused a stir across the country. Pictured: clothing taped in an Asda store in Cardiff last month

Bedding was apparently also viewed as a luxury item, as comforters and sheets were taped in a Tesco shop in Pontypool during the Wales lockdown

Bedding was apparently also viewed as a luxury item, as comforters and sheets were taped in a Tesco shop in Pontypool during the Wales lockdown

What are the rules for doing business in England's new lockdown?

Shops that can stay open:

  • Super Market
  • Supermarkets – but those with "sufficiently different parts" should close areas where non-essential items are sold
  • Garden center
  • Retailers offering essential goods and services

Stores to close (including, but not limited to):

  • dress
  • Electronics stores
  • Vehicle showrooms
  • Travel agency
  • Betting shops
  • Auction houses
  • cutter
  • Car washes
  • Tobacco and vape shops

Security guards came up to him and replied, "Since when is clothing no longer absolutely necessary?"

The shop worker, wearing a face mask, confronted him with an F&F label booth while the cameraman ran away from another employee.

A day later, a father tried shopping at a Tesco store in Newport, Gwent. He was only wearing his boxer shorts and a face mask.

He was stopped by security guards trying to push his car into the shop.

His angry wife Dawn, 33, filmed him trying to enter the store, saying, "Clothing is not essential – let him in."

Dawn said to the workers, “Clothing is not considered essential now. Their business policy is that clothing is not essential.

“Let him in to buy some clothes.

& # 39; That's more than a joke. There are children growing out there who need clothes. & # 39;

But one security guard says, “He's not dressed appropriately. Go take on the government. & # 39;

"You can't come in dressed like that."

When the staff said they wouldn't let him in, Dawn repeated, "So clothes are essential for everyday life?"

The worker replied, "Of course they are."

The couple were turned away, but Dawn later posted the video online, saying, 'Please note no lockout rules have been violated, no one has been put at risk, this non-essential list is not a joke! Clothing is not essential, Mr. Drakefold. «

Father Chris Noden, 38

Father Chris Noden, 38

38-year-old Chris Noden was stopped by security guards trying to push his car into the Tesco store in Newport, South Wales with only his boxer shorts and a face mask on

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) Tesco (t) London