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Teenage terrorists and child murderers could face life in prison if the criminal laws were violated


Boris Johnson promises to give dangerous criminals "the punishments they deserve" as juvenile terrorists and child murderers are behind bars under the great jolt of criminal law

  • Prime Minister says proposals will target "really despicable criminals".
  • According to Johnson, having a legal loophole means penalties will be reduced based on age
  • Teenage killers will no longer have their living conditions checked every two years
  • Rhys Jones's killer, Sean Mercer, may have to serve a full 22 year term
  • Terrorist Hashem Abedi was not sentenced to life imprisonment for being under 21

Teenage terrorists and child murderers could face life sentences as Boris Johnson called for action to be taken against a "loophole" that allows "genuinely despicable criminals" to avoid such old-age sentences.

The Prime Minister wrote proposals in today's Sunday Express in a white paper that will be presented this week Lowering the age limit for life imprisonment from the age of 21 in exceptional cases such as terrorism.

Other killers aged 15 to 17 are sentenced to harsher sentences, while juvenile inmates no longer have their living conditions checked every two years.

Sean Mercer was 16 years old when he was convicted in 2008 of the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones. According to new proposals, he was able to serve his entire minimum life sentence of 22 years.

Under the current system, anyone who has been sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes committed under the age of 18 can be tried after serving half their sentence.

This can be repeated every two years, adding further stress to the victims' families.

Johnson argued, “We are going to fill a void that some truly despicable criminals can avoid such punishment for being under 21 at the time of their crime.

Liverpool student Rhys Jones was murdered in 2008 by teenager Sean Mercer

Liverpool student Rhys Jones was murdered in 2008 by teenager Sean Mercer

"But if you – like Manchester Arena bombing accomplice Hashem Abedi – plan cold, calculating, and deliberate to murder and maim dozens of people, it doesn't matter if you're" just "18, 19, or 20 Years old you are doing it. & # 39;

He added: "We cannot lose sight of the need for a justice system that, above all, protects the people of this country."

"We need a judicial system that ensures people's safety": Boris Johnson has called for new legislation to fill the "void" for juvenile offenders escaping life sentences because of their age

The most radical shock to the conviction in 20 years also includes new powers preventing the automatic release of offenders who have been radicalized in prison while serving non-terrorist sentences.

Meanwhile, serious offenders convicted of rape, manslaughter, or GBH cannot be released after serving between four and seven years in prison.

Electronic tags are also required to be worn for a maximum of two years, not a year, and the maximum home curfew is increased from 16 to 23 hours.

Those who destroy or damage monuments are sentenced to harsher sentences, as are those convicted of attacking rescue workers.

Hashem Abedi was convicted of helping his brother Salman in the Manchester Arena bombings but was unable to serve life imprisonment because he was under 21 at the time of the murders

Hashem Abedi was convicted of helping his brother Salman in the Manchester Arena bombing but was unable to serve life imprisonment because he was under 21 at the time of the murders

The proposed changes could affect a range of offenders currently sentenced to prison terms for the murder of minors and terrorist attacks.

This includes Sean Mercer, who murdered 11-year-old Rhys Jones in 2007. Under the new changes, he would have served the entire 22-year minimum sentence he was given at the age of 16.

Hashem Abedi, who assisted his brother Salman in the bombing of the Manchester Arena, could not be sentenced to life imprisonment because he was under 21 at the time of the murders and was instead incarcerated for 55 years.

Judge Jeremy Baker said a life warrant would have been a "just sentence" for Abedi, but since that option was not open to the courts, the heavy jail sentence awarded to him could mean that he "may never be released."

In a statement on the proposed changes, Attorney General Robert Buckland said: “From longer jail sentences for dangerous criminals to new measures to improve rehabilitation and reduce reoffending, we are delivering a system better equipped than ever to fight crime The public can be confident that they are safe. & # 39;

Change in judicial law: what changes are proposed?

Life missions for child murderers.

Whole Life Orders for 18 to 21 year olds in exceptional cases such as terrorism.

Longer sentences for 15 to 17 year olds who commit murder.

Juvenile murderers no longer have life sentences reviewed every two years.

Abolition of the automatic release for offenders convicted of rape, manslaughter or GBH who have served between four and seven years.

The maximum electronic monitoring time has been doubled to two years.

The maximum curfew for the home will be increased from 16 to 23 hours.

Longer penalties for destruction or damage to monuments.

Scrapping automatic clearance for criminals radicalized behind bars.

Higher penalties for attacks on rescue workers.

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