ENTERTAINMENT

Tearful future brides "devastated" by government decision to postpone relaxation of wedding restrictions


Future brides, whose wedding plans have become disorganized after Boris Johnson's turnaround on relaxing restrictions, say they are "mentally exhausted" and feel "forgotten" by the British government.

Eleanor Bennett, 27, of Sunderland, said she and her partner had suffered "months of waiting and uncertainty" for their wedding and felt they "couldn't look forward to the happiest day of their lives" for fear of it. I get sabotaged at the last minute.

Another tearful future bride admitted that yesterday she was "devastated" and "absolutely devastated" and is now "struggling to find a way forward".

Couples who married as of today (August 1) should benefit from the relaxation of restrictions that would allow receptions for up to 30 guests indoors with seated meals, as long as the venue was Covid-safe. However, these plans were put on hold for at least two weeks.

Eleanor told FEMAIL: “We have five weeks to go to our wedding, and we have no idea whether the restrictions will be relaxed by then so that we can eat with our closest family and friends, or if we can only do so our ceremony, ”she said.

“We are both mentally exhausted. It was months of waiting and uncertainty, and when we finally got back to planning and looking forward to our wedding, the rules changed again.

Eleanor Bennett, 27, of Sunderland, said she and her partner had suffered "months of waiting and uncertainty" about their wedding and felt they couldn't look forward to the happiest day of their lives for fear they could be sabotaged at the last minute. Pictured on their wedding day in May

“It makes planning the day so much more difficult. We are also concerned that we could be a day away from our wedding and the rules could change without notice.

“Waiting for at least two more weeks of possibly more bad news is devastating. We feel that we cannot look forward to the "happiest day of our lives" as there is no guarantee that the government will allow it.

“We also feel forgotten by the government and feel that the wedding industry is not being looked after. It was very frustrating to see bars and restaurants full of people when we only wanted to eat with 30 people. & # 39;

The couple were originally supposed to get married in May, but were postponed to September 4 when the suspension meant that the first date could not take place.

Which lockdown easing measures were postponed yesterday?

Wedding receptions more than 30 people may no longer take place as planned. They will be postponed until at least August 14th

Test sporting events will be put on hold for the next two weeks until August 15th.

Close contact with Beauty Services Facials cannot be opened until August 15th.

Casinos, bowling alleys and ice rinks can only be reopened on the same day.

But Boris Johnson urged workers to return to work as planned next week.

Face masks will be mandatory in most public interiors, including places of worship and museums.

police will have new powers to enforce social distance rules, including wearing face masks.

She said, “After the guide was released three weeks ago, we changed it to a ceremony of just 27 people, including me and my partner, and a sitting meal that served drinks.

"We had to cancel our evening reception, which was a disco with additional guests."

Eleanor said they were happy to continue with the reduced guest list because they could have a little celebration with the people who mattered most to them.

"We don't want a big, lavish wedding with hundreds of people just to eat with those closest to us," she added.

& # 39; Our venue – the Hardwick Hall Hotel in Sedgefield – was very helpful and has already taken measures to protect guests. On arrival, temperature checks and track and trace details were carried out.

"Our room was also self-contained with a bar and toilets in the area, which we hired to limit interaction with other guests at the hotel."

Whatever happens, Eleanor said they would go ahead and admitted, “After all of this, we just want to be married.

"I also don't think there is any certainty of waiting until next year because it is clear that there are no long-term plans for weddings and industry."

Amanda Kellett from Grimbsy is due to marry her fiance Christopher Carr on August 8 and had booked a reception for her family and friends.

The future bride Amanda Kellet admitted that she did

The future bride Amanda Kellet admitted that she was "absolutely devastated" after having to cancel her wedding reception after the government decided to postpone the release of the suspension restrictions

However, yesterday she was "absolutely down to earth" when she heard during a work call that Boris Johnson announced that he would extend the reception restrictions until at least mid-August, making some celebrations just a few hours before they were scheduled to take place.

Speaking to Sky News, Amanda, who got engaged in November, said that she and her partner "are still trying to tell us about the effects."

"It was an extremely difficult and emotional four weeks," she said. & # 39; I was devastated. Absolutely devastated. & # 39;

Amanda added that she was swamped with phone calls from worried family members and friends who were wondering what was going on after confirming that everything was going on last week.

“We have friends and family who have booked hotel accommodation. We have booked a hotel accommodation.

Amanda from Grimbsy is supposed to marry her fiance Christopher Carr (picture) on August 8 and had booked a reception for her family and friends

Amanda from Grimbsy is supposed to marry her fiance Christopher Carr (picture) on August 8 and had booked a reception for her family and friends

"We just don't know how much of our wedding we can actually drive."

Amanda told how most of her wedding was planned for last December, but everything was "completely put on hold" when Britain was banned in March.

"Weddings are stressful enough without COVID, but we're always planning quicksand," she told Sky News.

Amanda explained that they spent a lot of money organizing and paying for their wedding, including reception.

Despite the delay in easing restrictions, Amanda firmly believes that she and Christopher will tie the knot this year and is determined to make their "Covid wedding" as special as possible.

Amanda explained that they spent a lot of money organizing and paying for their wedding, including reception

Amanda explained that they spent a lot of money organizing and paying for their wedding, including reception

"We went through a damn emotional roller coaster ride and the most important thing is to get married," she said, adding that they are now rethinking their options for their reception.

Amanda said they will most likely try to have it outside to follow government guidelines, but it depends on the weather.

Triple mother Chris, a blogger from Birmingham, said she and her partner had decided to cancel their big day in October because they couldn't imagine that it would go on as planned.

“Today I should have counted up to my big day with excitement and love. Today, just eight weeks, we're getting married at our local registry office, ”she wrote on Instagram.

Triple mother Chris, a blogger from Birmingham, said she and her partner had decided to cancel their big day in October because they couldn't imagine that it would go on as planned

Triple mother Chris, a blogger from Birmingham, said she and her partner had decided to cancel their big day in October because they couldn't imagine that it would go on as planned

"But after my ceremony there will be no party, no reception, no meeting. Everything that I planned, paid for, set up and looked forward to is canceled.

“Yesterday we met with our venue and discussed together how our wedding simply couldn't go as we would like because of Covid 19. That is why we decided together to cancel. I am devastated.

"I don't know what our wedding day will look like now, but at least we can still marry legally. And in the end that's all that really matters. Our wedding day is canceled, but our love is not. & # 39;

Yesterday brides, wedding venues and those working in the industry were asked what the Prime Minister's announcement meant for their future.

Mr. Johnson conceded that the news would be "a real blow" to those who had made plans and to the industry that had just seen a boom in business after weddings resumed on July 4th after they were reopened had been banned since the blockade began in March.

Months of restrictions have pledged planners, venues, and suppliers, and yesterday's announcement raised further doubts as to when they might be able to start earning again.

BRIDE: LEFT DESTROYED AFTER CEREMONY HAS BEEN CANCELED WITH 24 HOURS OF MESSAGE

Graham Podesta, 53, said his daughter Jamie, who is due to be married on Saturday August 1, is in tears after the announcement. "We have literally 24 hours to pull the plug," he said

Graham Podesta, 53, said his daughter Jamie, who is due to be married on Saturday August 1, is in tears after the announcement. "We have literally 24 hours to pull the plug," he said

Graham Podesta, 53, said his daughter Jamie, who is due to be married on Saturday August 1, is in tears after the announcement.

"We have literally 24 hours to pull the plug," he said. "We have to tell people who travel that they shouldn't travel, people who booked in Travelodge that they shouldn't do it, it's just a nightmare.

An hour after the Prime Minister's announcement, he told PA news agency: “We had an email from the caterers about 20 minutes ago, discussing tomorrow's arrangements.

"You haven't even caught up with the announcement.

The future bride, Jamie Podesta, had to tell guests not to come to their wedding tomorrow after the rules change without notice

The future bride, Jamie Podesta, had to tell guests not to come to their wedding tomorrow after the rules change without notice

“We should go there this afternoon to drop off the cake and sort things out, but I'm not sure they're aware of it at all.

"Of course we will be out of our own pockets, but as annoying as it is, it is nowhere near as annoying as the effect it has on my daughter."

Mr. Podesta of Gillingham, Kent said he was particularly frustrated with the government's lack of compassion for not warning about the new measures.

"The poor children really want to be married," he said.

& # 39; This is meant to be a significant, special occasion for the two. It’s very frustrating.

“I understand the government's reasoning and I disagree with its methodology.

& # 39; You must quit. They can't just jump on a bride within 24 hours of their wedding going out the window. & # 39;

WEDDING PLANNER: DIDN'T WORK IN MONTHS

Katie Tottenham of Katie Tottenham last had an event in February and has postponed everything for this summer

Katie Tottenham of Katie Tottenham last had an event in February and has postponed everything for this summer

Katie Tottenham of Katie Tottenham Events, who is planning tailor-made parties and weddings and advice, said: “The bride and groom do not want to make deposits to venues or suppliers at the moment because they are non-refundable.

"And for me as a wedding planner, you lose the way you go. It's just devastating.

“It's just so confusing because the rules are constantly changing. I basically had no work. My last event was February 29th. I had planned three weddings for this summer, all postponed.

Wedding planner Liz Taylor has accused the government of being "unpredictable and unpredictable" in its approach

Wedding planner Liz Taylor has accused the government of being "unpredictable and unpredictable" in its approach

“I'm looking forward to next year and think: Will these events take place at all? Many people in the industry feel forgotten. People don't seem to understand how many livelihoods are affected.

“Weddings may seem like a luxury, but for some couples it means everything.

& # 39; The problem for many people in the wedding industry is that we are all pretty small businesses and so many of us will go under.

“I restarted alone last October, it's Katie Tottenham events, bespoke weddings and parties.

"I'm supported by the government, but it won't take forever. I usually charge couples an administration fee so that I can be upfront and transparent about how much it will cost. & # 39;

CATERER: GONE IN LIQUID

Hattie Mauleverer, the founder of TopHat Catering, was supposed to take £ 300,000 in weddings in June, but her business has gone into liquidation

Hattie Mauleverer, the founder of TopHat Catering, was supposed to take £ 300,000 in weddings in June, but her business has gone into liquidation

Hattie Mauleverer, the founder of TopHat Catering in London, was supposed to take £ 300,000 in weddings in June.

Instead, she made the decision to liquidate the company after a series of cancellations, which means that she will be evicted from the warehouse from which she also runs the thriving Eight Foods business.

"I had to work with other catering companies to ensure that weddings that we booked for next summer are taken into account," she said.

James Belton of Seawise Catering said it was heartbreaking for suppliers to be deprived of hope just as they got back on their feet

James Belton of Seawise Catering said it was heartbreaking for suppliers to be deprived of hope just as they got back on their feet

& # 39; As an industry, we urge the government to provide more support to the catering sector to secure its 570,000 jobs.

"We have no support as an industry because we are not considered a restaurant. It's a really terrible time."

Meanwhile, Seawise Catering's James Belton and Kelly Rank said to Femail: “Lockdown came at the beginning of a very busy season when we were supposed to offer our services at weddings, festivals and events.

“We were about to finalize the newest part of our fleet, a converted ambulance from the 1960s, but due to the closure, work on it was interrupted.

& # 39; The news of the relaxation of the lockdown measures was fantastic as we were able to get back into business and try to regain the year. This last minute change of direction is devastating for us and the entire industry, just when we thought we could start our year again, not to mention the potential newlyweds, for whom this will be the second rejection for the second time.

"While public security comes first, it is heartbreaking to give people hope and then take it away just as we got back on our feet."

PHOTOGRAPHER: THOUSANDS OF INCOME LOST

Tracey Smith of Tracey M Photography said that because of the pandemic, she had no wedding work this year and lost thousands of income.

The Derbyshire photographer last shot a wedding in January. She was due to celebrate a wedding next weekend, but was canceled because of the pandemic.

She said to FEMAIL: "I have a wedding until October, and only because the venue has not yet canceled.

“My core bride is in the hands of the decision of the venues. You just can't plan anything, it's a real shame.

“I had booked a wedding for June 6th, it was postponed to August 7th, but due to the suspension, they have now separated as a couple.

“I had another one in August and they decided to flee instead.

“I have had no wedding income since January and I am not entitled to scholarships.

“I usually do about 15 weddings a year, but I also work for a few other photographers and I've lost all of that work too, I've lost thousands.

“Fortunately, I'm an outdoor photographer so I can go outside and take pictures, but people tighten the wallets, so it's difficult.

"It is a shame for anyone who marries. The uncertainties are terrible. How can the industry survive? Who will pay us financially? & # 39;

"A lot of people say we should only get a part-time job, but how should we do it when everyone is applying for these jobs?

"I booked a wedding for March next year, but who knows if it will go on like this."

WEDDING VENUE DIRECTOR AND BRIDE-TO-BE: NO WORK IN MONTHS

Sarah Davis, 44, bride and director of the wedding venue Shottle Hall in Belper, Derbyshire, was hit twice after Boris Johnson's announcement yesterday (picture).

Sarah Davis, 44, bride and director of the wedding venue Shottle Hall in Belper, Derbyshire, was hit twice after Boris Johnson's announcement yesterday (picture).

Sarah Davis, 44, a bride and director of Shottle Hall, Belper, Derbyshire, was hit by a double blow after Boris Johnson's announcement.

Sarah told FEMAIL: “The business side is financially worse for us, and obviously it is not just the business, but every single person I deal with for their weddings because I know how they feel personally.

WHAT SHOULD COUPLES DO NOW?

Liz Taylor, CEO of professional wedding planners at Taylor Lynn Corporation, is celebrity-preferred and is planning the wedding of Gary Neville, as well as events for Gary Barlow, Michelle Keegan, and Mark Wright.

In an interview with FEMAIL, she asked the couples to postpone the celebrations until next year.

“My advice to anyone planning something now is to keep the fire going. The government is so unpredictable and unpredictable, I accept that they don't know what's going on, but what they do is ruining the event industry.

"There are no magic options or wands, but I don't think we'll see a live event with any substance by June or July 2021, and the industry will have to go on for a year without support.

“A wedding we worked on and which was canceled was a big Indian wedding.

“The family had booked flights from all over the world, people really underestimate the consequences and the effects of it, it's not just a wedding canceled.

& # 39; With the new legalization, a lot was canceled and now even more.

“It's not just the couples, it's more than worrying the impact on my world, deposits, suppliers, and backing up for another date. Everyone is on the same train. Logistically speaking, trying to reorganize is a nightmare.

& # 39; The event business has lost an absolute fortune, while we have employees on vacation, this legalization will only destroy the industry until October

"It is very, very serious, it changes life, I have survived two recessions, with the right relationships and the right support we have, and if you run the business properly and have no debt, you can survive it.

“Financially, the financial impact for me as a bride is not that big because if we have to postpone receptions we can do it, or if you just want to do a smaller ceremony you can do it. We thought we could receive 30 people, but of course we have to wait and see.

"I think most people who have gone this far will not cancel. You want to be married, you want to have your day, people don't just do it on a whim, that's the point? It's something people want to do to start their next life journey. It's not like booking a vacation.

"It's just the frustration of being told one thing, raising hopes, and then learning something else in the last hour.

"Think of the people who booked their receptions for tomorrow and can't have them now, it's ridiculous."

Sarah added: “People will still return to their own homes after the small ceremonies, they won't just go home separately. They'll go to a private house, just like the government is trying to get people not to.

“There is more space for social distance at an event location than in a bar or a restaurant. We can keep receptions sensible and follow the guidelines, certainly with social distance.

“At a reception you know everyone who is there and where he was. In a bar and restaurant, you could sit with 100 people you don't even know. & # 39;

Sarah's business is not an insurance payout, which she believes will be the experience of many companies in the industry.

She believes the victims will become apparent when the vacation program ends in October, when the wedding restrictions have not yet been resolved.

Sarah said the financial impact on the industry is likely to continue for years, with some venues likely to raise prices to make ends meet.

She said: “We haven't had any money since March and couldn't get a government grant. We had the bank loan, but of course we have to think about repaying it and not lending more money.

“We should have been classified as hospitality, we can do it just like you. We have a restaurant and hotel license.

& # 39; The industry has been forgotten from the start. They sum up all the weddings, provided the celebrations are massive and that's not the point. & # 39;

Sarah believes 50 is a usable and sensible number for most wedding venues to deal with the outdoor space they have. The average wedding reception in normal times sees “about 80 to 150 guests”.

"You can sit in a crowded pub garden but don't have a wedding?" Social media users strike government rules

LOCATION: MORE THAN 250 WEDDINGS CANCELED

Chris Maylor, the wedding venue for Peckforton Castle's executive director in Crewe, Cheshire, said the recent announcement was a "nightmare" and "panicked" couples have already called his venue to ask what will happen.

Over 250 marriages have been canceled at the 19th century venue since the beginning of the ban, and Mr. Maylor now expects fewer than 100 to exist before 2021.

& # 39;Our phones are ringing and couples are panicking, ”he said.

"We have couples who panic (over dates) in November or December and want to move or cancel all their weddings."

He said the government decision made things "very difficult" for his venue.

Chris Maylor, the wedding venue for Peckforton Castle's executive director in Crewe, Cheshire, said the recent announcement was a "nightmare" and "panicked" couples have already called his venue to ask what will happen

Chris Maylor, the wedding venue for Peckforton Castle's executive director in Crewe, Cheshire, said the recent announcement was a "nightmare" and "panicked" couples have already called his venue to ask what will happen

& # 39; It makes it very difficult for us. So far we have canceled 250 weddings during the ban. This creates a big financial problem for us.

"There will probably be a point where we can no longer stand it.

“We only need the government to give us a road map. Instead of just saying that they hope to increase the number, they need a roadmap.

“There is currently no targeted support for the wedding industry. It is difficult for everyone.

He added that the wedding industry makes its money in spring and summer, so the coronavirus pandemic looked like you had three consecutive winters.

Many other companies also rely on venues to be open, Maylor said.

& # 39; Many other companies really rely on us. Florists, photographers, everyone benefits from the fact that we are successful.

“We are all experiencing an extremely difficult time. But I really feel for them those smaller companies that don't have the resources.

“I couldn't give you a total of how that will affect us. It will make us normalize even further.

Samantha Vaughn, owner of the small wedding venue Dewsall Court in Hereford, told FEMAIL that several couples have contacted her since yesterday's announcement.

"I had couples who made contact. I have a wedding for 150 people in September and they want to postpone it. They ask what options they have. & # 39;

Ms. Vaughn said that October was the largest booking month for her venue, but was now "delicate" and that the government needed to support her and other venues.

She added that she already had 30 rescheduling and two wedding cancellations that were due to take place before Christmas.

"For us, wedding couples have to cancel six to eight weeks before their date," she said.

& # 39; If the country opens in early October, all of our October bookings will be postponed or canceled until then.

“If you (the government) cannot take our lead times into account, you have to support us with our lead times.

"The nightmare is that our vacation is ending, so we will have no events and no vacation support."

And Emma Hardcastle, founder of the wedding platform Hostology, said the decision to postpone receptions for up to 30 people had sparked "another wave of uncertainty" in the industry.

Around 40 venues use Hostology to communicate with couples when organizing weddings.

"It creates another wave of uncertainty in the industry," said Ms. Hardcastle.

“Every time the government announces something, the venues receive 10 or 15 calls from couples.

“The venues do not generate any income and still have to maintain and operate buildings and maintain staff. The couples support us a lot. & # 39;

She said while the venues "tend to offer repayment to couples who want to cancel their weddings," instead, "90 percent" of the couples want to postpone it.

"Basically, most brides and grooms or brides and brides or grooms and grooms want to have their big day," she said.

She called on the government to offer more clarity to what it called a "home industry."

& # 39; This sector is like a home industry. These venues are often a venue, usually people who have a barn or house. They are small businesses, ”she added.

& # 39; You don't have much ability to borrow. At the end of the vacation, they have to choose to find a few giants per month of social security or let them go.

"When couples postpone weddings in September, October, and November, venues have to pay staff they won't use."

"We are committed to clarity for the sector."

Samantha Vaughn, owner of the small wedding venue Dewsall Court in Hereford, said the government must provide support to small venues that have no idea whether their bookings will be canceled

Samantha Vaughn, owner of the small wedding venue Dewsall Court in Hereford, said the government must provide support to small venues that have no idea whether their bookings will be canceled

WEDDING FAIR ORGANIZER

Kate Beavis, owner of Magpie Wedding, a wedding blog and magazine that connects couples with suppliers, told FEMAIL that the recent announcement was "devastating" for both couples and the industry as bakers, DJs, and caterers were gone would be working with less than 24 hours notice.

"I think the general feeling is devastated for all the couples who have been given a lifeline and will have weddings tomorrow or next week," she said.

& # 39; The wedding industry is worth £ 10 billion to the economy. We got this new lifeline and hopefully we were and now the plug has been pulled. I know people who had cakes ready and who were canceled at the last minute.

Kate added that the people in the industry were "so grateful" for the lifeline of being able to invite 30 people to weddings and "devastated" that it was taken away.

"Aside from losing the wedding, people are frustrated with the confusing rules. Why can you go to the pub but not marry?" She added.

Kate Beavis told Femail that cancellations affect mental health and relationships

Kate Beavis told Femail that cancellations affect mental health and relationships

& # 39; The industry has reportedly lost £ 3bn, and more than half a million sole proprietors are going under.

“It is devastating, many brides I work with have resigned themselves to a smaller wedding and welcomed a small intimate wedding to their loved ones because you could have at least 30 people.

“Cancellations are also costly and affect people's mental health and relationships. Venues near me are closed.

“When it comes to multicultural weddings, Asian weddings, Indian weddings and Hindu weddings have a lot of people, and 30 guests are simply not feasible.

Kate added that the short term could be "devastating" for people working in the industry.

“To be drawn in less than 24 hours – but in the meantime, tomorrow we can get £ 10 off a pizza.

“It is devastating for a couple and the loss of money too! Getting married shouldn't be stressful, it can be a bit stressful, but now it's just crazy

“The mixed messages and the short deadline, the fact that you can go to the gym but you can't get married.

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