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Team behind Oxford University's AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine


An "enthusiastic" Prince William has congratulated the Oxford University team, which worked ten years in just ten months, to produce a 90 percent effective Covid vaccine.

The Duke of Cambridge welcomed the team's "amazing performance" this morning on a Zoom call from Kensington Palace saying, "Well done, I'm so happy for all of you, I really am."

“I saw the amount of time and effort put into this thing on everyone's face in June, and I could see everyone was under a lot of pressure so I'm so excited you cracked it – so really well done. & # 39;

The team for combating viruses in lab coats worked against the clock to limit the usually ten years of tedious administration to just ten months.

He attended the video session with Professor Andy Pollard, Professor of Pediatric Infection and Immunity; Professor Sarah Gilbert, Professor of Vaccination Science; and Professor Louise Richardson (top right), Vice Chancellor of Oxford University

The Duke of Cambridge hailed the team's "amazing performance" this morning at Kensington Palace, saying, "Well done, I'm so happy for all of you, it really is me."

The Duke of Cambridge hailed the team's "amazing performance" this morning at Kensington Palace, saying, "Well done, I'm so happy for all of you, it really is me."

And their work has paid off, as the newly published clinical trial results for the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine show it is 90 percent effective in stopping the virus.

The news is a huge boost to the government, which already has 4 million doses ready to be administered once approved and has ordered 100 million.

Prince William attended the video session with Professor Andy Pollard, Professor of Pediatric Infection and Immunity; Professor Sarah Gilbert, Professor of Vaccination Science; and Professor Louise Richardson, Vice Chancellor, Oxford University.

They told William how the vaccine is based on decades of in-depth research and will be critically important over the next six months.

Kensington Palace tweeted excerpts from the call, to which Oxford University replied, “Thank you for your continued support. It is an honor to share with you the outstanding work of the Oxford Vaccine Group. & # 39;

More than 24,000 volunteers were involved in Oxford's Phase 3 trials in the UK and Brazil, half of which received the vaccine and the remainder a false push. There were only 30 cases of Covid-19 in people given the vaccine compared to 101 in the placebo group. None of the participants who took the vaccine became seriously ill

More than 24,000 volunteers were involved in Oxford's Phase 3 trials in the UK and Brazil, half of which received the vaccine and the remainder a false push. There were only 30 cases of Covid-19 in people given the vaccine compared to 101 in the placebo group. None of the participants who took the vaccine became seriously ill

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered cold virus that infected chimpanzees. It was modified to make it weak so it wouldn't cause disease in humans and loaded with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein that Covid-19 uses to enter human cells

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered cold virus that infected chimpanzees. It was modified to make it weak so it wouldn't cause disease in humans and loaded with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein that Covid-19 uses to enter human cells

It emerged that month that William contracted coronavirus in April but did not make his diagnosis public. Sources said he did not want to alert the nation.

Prince Charles was quarantined around the same time after mild symptoms.

Preparations to tackle a rapidly spreading “Disease X” began after the devastating Ebola outbreak in 2014 and resulted in 11,000 deaths.

Plans have been drawn up to make a vaccine lightning fast in the hope that lives can be saved if another fatal outbreak sets in.

Vaccination work began in January following reports of unknown viruses spreading in Wuhan.

The team made sure every protocol was followed and no corners were cut while they struggled to produce the butt.

The reason the trials completed so quickly was because of the tremendous global drive, the enormous amounts of funding, and the number of willing participants.

Dr. Mark Toshner, who helped with the Cambridge Studies, said that most of the ten years typically spent making a vaccine is "a lot of nothing".

Oxford University today announced its results of clinical studies for its sting, showing that the virus can be stopped up to 90 percent effectively

Oxford University today announced its results of clinical studies for its sting, showing that the virus can be stopped up to 90 percent effectively

More than 24,000 volunteers were involved in Oxford's Phase 3 trials in the UK and Brazil, half of which received the vaccine and the remainder a false push.

There were only 30 cases of Covid-19 in people given the vaccine compared to 101 in the placebo group. None of the participants who took the vaccine became seriously ill.

The Oxford vaccine is a genetically engineered cold virus that infected chimpanzees.

It was modified to make it weak so it wouldn't cause disease in humans and loaded with the gene for the coronavirus spike protein that Covid-19 uses to enter human cells.

The burst is expected to cost just £ 2 a time and can be stored inexpensively in a regular refrigerator, unlike other vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna, which showed similar promising results last week but must be kept in extremely cold temperatures using expensive equipment.

But who are the "fantastic five" behind the latest push that the government is hoping can help bring British life back to normal?

Professor Katie Ewer

Although Katie Ewer was unable to get the grade for medical school, she didn't give up on her dreams. Instead, she took on a microbiologist and became fascinated with infectious diseases

Although Katie Ewer was unable to get the grade for medical school, she didn't give up on her dreams. Instead, she took on a microbiologist and became fascinated with infectious diseases

Although Katie Ewer was unable to get the grade for medical school, she never gave up on her dreams of a career in biology.

Instead, she took up microbiology and, despite "hating" immunology, was fascinated by infectious diseases while studying.

After completing her PhD in this subject, she moved to the Jenner Institute at Oxford University, where she has worked on a malaria vaccine for the past 13 years.

Today she is a senior scientist at the Jenner Institute, which develops vaccines and conducts clinical studies for diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis and disease Ebola.

When asked earlier this year by Esquire magazine whether the work developing a vaccine had been stressful, it simply replied, "Yes."

She added, "I'm trying not to think about it too much."

Professor Ewer added that she has stopped using social media and added, "I had to stop looking at it because when I think about it too much, I get really stressed."

Professor Ewer also runs a Twitter page titled "The Wife Scientific," describing herself as "an adjunct professor of COVID-19, malaria and vaccine immunology against pathogens while being a perfect woman and mother!".

Sarah Gilbert

Sarah Gilbert is a British vaccine scientist and professor of vaccination science at Oxford University.

The team is led by Sarah Gilbert, a UK vaccination scientist who is Professor of Vaccination Science at Oxford University

The team is led by Sarah Gilbert, a UK vaccination scientist who is Professor of Vaccination Science at Oxford University

She has over 25 years of experience in the field, having previously led the development and testing of a universal flu vaccine that was clinically tested in 2011.

Not only is Professor Gilbert busy at work, she also has her hands full at home, being the mother of triplets.

Born in April 1962, she attended Kettering High School before attending the University of East Anglia at Norwich, where she received her PhD in Life Sciences and later the University of Hull.

She later took on roles in Gloucestershire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire before moving to the laboratory of Irish vaccine researcher Adrian Hill, where she studied malaria. The two are both involved in the spin-off of the Oxford University biotech company Vaccitech.

She became a professor at the Jenner Trust in Oxford in 2010 and began research on a universal flu vaccine, which was clinically tested in 2011.

This year's work by the 58-year-old on the Covid-19 vaccine earned her a place on the Times "Science Power List" in May 2020.

She had to balance the intense work with her personal life, including the mother of triplets – all of them now at university.

Earlier this year, Professor Gilbert told the Independent, “I'm trained to do this – I'm the mother of triplets.

“If you get four hours a night with triplets, you are very good. I've been through this. & # 39;

Adrian Hill

Adrian Hill is an Irish vaccines doctor and director of the Jenner Institute, which develops vaccines and conducts clinical trials for diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis and Ebola

Adrian Hill is an Irish vaccines doctor and director of the Jenner Institute, which develops vaccines and conducts clinical trials for diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis and Ebola

Adrian Hill is an Irish vaccine doctor and director of the Jenner Institute.

Established in November 2005The institute is named after Edward Jenner – the inventor of vaccinations.

Professor Hill was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1958 and attended Belvedere College in Dublin for a secondary school.

He later studied medicine at Trinity College, Dublin, before moving to Magdelan College, Oxford – where he completed the remainder of his medical degree.

He later joined the Wellcome Trust and in 2014 led a clinical trial of a vaccine against Ebola after the outbreak in Africa.

According to the New York Times, Professor Hill became interested in vaccines in the early 1980s when he was visiting an uncle who was a priest and worked in a hospital in Zimbabwe.

He said, "I came back and asked myself," What do you see in these hospitals in England and Ireland? "You don't have any of these diseases."

Andrew Pollard

Andrew Pollard is the director of the vaccine group. He is also Professor of Pediatric Infections and Immunity at Oxford University

Andrew Pollard is the director of the vaccine group. He is also Professor of Pediatric Infections and Immunity at Oxford University

Andrew Pollard is the director of the Oxford Vaccine Group. He is also Professor of Pediatric Infections and Immunity at Oxford University, Honorary Pediatrician at Oxford Children's Hospital, and Vice Master of St Cross College, Oxford.

After graduating from St. Bartholomew & # 39; s Hospital Medical School, University of London in 1989, he trained in pediatrics at Birmingham & # 39; s Children & # 39; s Hospital.

He later specialized in pediatric infectious diseases at St. Mary & # 39; s Hospital in London, UK, and British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada.

Since 2016 he has been a member of the World Health Organization's SAGE Committee on Immunization.

He has published 46 articles in his field and supervised 37 PhD students.

His publications include over 500 manuscripts and books on various topics in pediatrics and infectious diseases.

Outside of work, Professor Pollard climbed Jaonli (6632 m) for the first time in 1988 and Chamlang (7309 m) in Great Britain in 1991 and was deputy leader of the successful British Medical Everest Expedition in 1994.

Teresa (Tess) Lambe

Teresa Lambe is Associate Professor and Researcher at the Jenner Institute. She has already gained experience in vaccine research, including Ebola, the flu and MERS - another coronavirus

Teresa Lambe is Associate Professor and Researcher at the Jenner Institute. She has already gained experience in vaccine research, including Ebola, the flu and MERS – another coronavirus

Teresa Lambe is Associate Professor and Researcher at the Jenner Institute.

She has already gained experience in vaccine research, including Ebola, the flu and MERS – another coronavirus.

Dr. Lambe grew up in County Kildare, Ireland, and continued to study Pharmacology and Molecular Genetics at University College Dublin before moving to Oxford University in 2002.

Outside of work, she enjoys working and spending time with her husband and children. She says she didn't have much time for it this year.

She told the Irish Times, “I love science and vaccine work, and I'm happy that this means that I can do something constructive about this pandemic. I want to help, and that's what keeps me going. & # 39;

The explorers

In addition to the five named as leaders in the vaccine trials, researchers are also behind the project.

Today Oxford University thanked those involved in a series of messages on its Twitter page.

In addition to the five named as leaders in the vaccine trials, researchers are also behind the project

Today Oxford University thanked those involved in a series of messages on its Twitter page

In addition to the five named as leaders in the vaccine trials, researchers are also behind the project. Today Oxford University thanked those involved in a series of messages on its Twitter page.

Oxford University tweeted pictures of some of the vaccine researchers involved in the studies

Oxford University tweeted pictures of some of the vaccine researchers involved in the studies

'I'm a little proud': Volunteers in Oxford's coronavirus vaccine study hail 'promising' results as scientists show the sting was 90% effective in clinical trials

By Luke Andrews for MailOnline

A volunteer in the Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine study has shown she has a "tiny sense of pride" in participating in research that could finally defeat the virus.

Sarah Hurst, 47, of South Oxfordshire said it was "a great feeling" after hearing today that the vaccine could trigger an immune response in up to 90 percent of those who get the sting.

Jack Somers, 35, from London, who also attended, said he was "very happy" and felt that his vaccine team had "just won".

The couple, who both work as journalists, received two shots of the experimental or the placebo vaccine. Mr Somers said he had side effects of shoulder pain and a slightly elevated temperature, but Ms. Somers said she did not experience any.

Sarah Hurst, 47, of South Oxfordshire said it was "a great feeling" after hearing today that the vaccine could trigger an immune response in up to 90 percent of those who get the sting

Jack Somers, 35, from London, who also attended, said he was "very happy" and felt that his vaccine team had "just won".

Sarah Hurst, 47, of South Oxfordshire said it was "a great feeling" after hearing today that the vaccine could trigger an immune response in up to 90 percent of those who get the sting. Jack Somers, 35, from London, who also attended, said he was "very happy" and felt that his vaccine team had "just won".

Oxford University scientists announced today that their vaccine elicits an immune response in up to 90 percent of volunteers when the first shot is given as a half dose – a way to make the world normal again.

Of the 20,000 people who received the sting, half received the vaccine. There were only 30 Covid-19 infections in this group compared to 101 in the placebo, and none of them showed a severe reaction.

Politicians and experts today congratulated the Oxford team on their breakthrough after their vaccine strengthened global armaments against the virus.

A second volunteer in the studies previously told MailOnline that they had a fever, headache, chills, and fatigue 14 hours after their first shot.

Brazilian doctor João Pedro R. Feitosa, 28, died during studies of Covid-19 after being given a placebo. He has been working in emergency rooms and in intensive care for infected patients in two hospitals in Rio de Janeiro since March.

Ms. Hurst said, “It's really the developers and everyone who did all the work, all the medical students, who are constantly meeting vaccine participants all day, testing them and being on the front lines.

"But it's good, it's a great feeling to help make a vaccine."

Explaining why she signed up, she said, “I live near where it's done and they were looking for people in the Thames Valley. As soon as I saw that I wanted to get involved in researching a vaccine. & # 39;

She underwent health and blood tests before receiving her two recordings, and filled out a journal to keep researchers informed of her movements as the study progressed, as well as any symptoms.

"You have to treat it like you were in the placebo group anyway. You wouldn't go out and randomly expose yourself because you didn't know," she said.

Although she doesn't have any side effects, it doesn't mean she received the placebo. The study used the meningitis vaccine as a control, which scientists argued would produce a similar response to the Covid-19 shock.

She said today's results are "promising" and "the fact that it doesn't need to be refrigerated at a very low temperature and is cheaper than the other vaccines will help make it easier to distribute".

"You have to treat it like you were in the placebo group anyway. You wouldn't go out and randomly expose yourself because you didn't know," she said.

“People have only been vaccinated for a few months, so I still want to know: what will the results be after a year? Will it take effect after a year?

"You really just have to wait for that."

Mr Somers, who also participated in the studies, said it was hard to believe how quickly scientists came up with the vaccine.

Mr Somers, who also participated in the studies, said it was hard to believe how quickly scientists came up with the vaccine. Pictured: Researchers are working on the Covid vaccine at Oxford University

Mr Somers, who also participated in the studies, said it was hard to believe how quickly scientists came up with the vaccine. Pictured: Researchers are working on the Covid vaccine at Oxford University

"I can't help but take my hat off of the scientists," said the freelance journalist from southwest London.

“I remember Professor Matthew Snape of Oxford University sitting in a hospital six months ago watching a security video. He spoke very carefully, deliberately, and cautiously about how this vaccine might or might not work.

“Now it seems amazing that we are here six months later and that Jab can stop the coronavirus very effectively.

"It's not where I thought we were six months ago, it's not even the place I thought we were a month ago, but it's testament to the work of so many people, so many extraordinary people. "

Volunteers are not given any information about the progress of the process. You have therefore followed the progress in the media with everyone else.

And Mr Sommers said that while he was very excited to see positive results from other vaccines like the one developed by Pfizer, he had a special feeling about this vaccine.

"It feels a bit like I supported a team and it was good to see other teams win and score, but now my team has won and I'm very happy about it," he said.

The UK has received 100 million doses of Oxford's vaccine, with 4 million expected to be shipped before the end of this year. However, they must be approved by regulators before they can be distributed.

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