ENTERTAINMENT

Sweets with the claim "made from fruit juice" make people think they are healthy.


Waitrose & # 39; s Fruit Jellies, proudly claiming to be "made with fruit juice", are loaded with an astonishing 62 g of sugar in half a pack (100 g).

Popular sweets that market themselves as healthy alternatives to confectionery contain twice as much sugar as a Martian bar.

Waitrose & # 39; s Fruit Jellies, proudly claiming to be "made with fruit juice", are loaded with an astonishing 62 g of the sweet material in half a pack (100 g).

Only four sweets contain more sugar (28 g) than a child under 10 years old (24 g) and almost as much as the recommended adult intake (30 g).

The founder of the Leon chain of restaurants today attacked manufacturers for "misleading" claims that led people to believe they were making a positive health decision.

Henry Dimbleby, who leads a government review of the UK food system to develop a national strategy, said that products are "clothing in a veneer of goodness", but in reality they are no better than other junk foods like a Marsbar. which contains 30 g sugar per 51 g bar.

He aimed at Marks and Spencer for his legendary Percy Pig sweets, which also boast of being "made from natural fruit juice" even though they have a whopping 56g of sugar per 100g.

Sugar in fruit juices is no better than sugar in traditional sweets because it is so concentrated and all the nutrients are removed from the fruits from which it was extracted.

After Boris Johnson unveiled his new obesity strategy this week, it comes in a dramatic U-turn after the Prime Minister's hospital battle against Covid-19.

Mr. Johnson had previously been a violent critic of the state for interfering with people's nutritional freedom, but has admitted that he has undergone a change of heart after his time in intensive care.

Obesity is one of the main risk factors for the coronavirus and can lead to a variety of other diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, stroke, heart and liver diseases and cancer.

Bear fruit Yoyos Strawberry makes a number of health claims on its packaging, including the fact that it is

Bear fruit Yoyos Strawberry makes a number of health claims on its packaging, including the fact that it is "pure fruit", contains "one of your five fruits a day" and "contains the same natural sugar as an apple". However, one serving contains 8 g of free sugar per pack

Similarly, Robinson's Fruit Shoot Fruit Bars claim

Similarly, Robinson's Fruit Shoot Fruit Bars claim to be "one of your five a day", "no added sugar", and "great for lunch boxes". However, a 25 g bar contains 16 g of sugar, 84 percent of the free sugar that children aged four to six should have in one day, according to the NHS

The sugar in fruit does not have a negative impact on our health, as fruit is full of fiber, which slows down the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the blood.

Dietary fibers also expand the intestine and make you feel fuller, making you less inclined to eat more calories.

When fruit juice turns into fruit, the sugar comes out of the cells and becomes free sugar.

Free sugar is digested extremely quickly and increases the blood sugar level in the body. Regularly increased blood sugar can lead to diabetes and heart problems.

When fruit becomes juice, the fiber is also lost, so you don't feel full and tend to consume more calories.

Eating too many calories leads to weight gain and, over a longer period of time, obesity and the associated numerous health problems.

According to the company's website, Rowntree fruit pastilles are "made from fruit juice" and are made without artificial colors, flavors or preservatives, so you can feel happy to enjoy them as an entertaining treat.

However, they contain an astonishing 55.9 g of sugar per 100 g serving – which means that more than 50 percent of the product is made from the sweet material.

There is 14.9 grams of sugar per serving of just seven sweets – 17 percent of an adult's recommended daily allowance.

Starburst chewy candy contains 83.1 g sugar per 100 g serving and 34.9 g per 42 g serving – that's 39 percent of the recommended daily allowance for an adult.

The first three ingredients in Starburst that are said to be bursting with fruit juice are corn syrup, sugar, and hardened palm kernel oil. Only 11.5 percent of the snack's ingredients are made from fruit juices.

Henry Dimbleby, founder of the Leon chain, led the National Food Strategy and attacked manufacturers for "misleading" claims that led people to believe they were making a positive health decision

Henry Dimbleby, founder of the Leon chain, led the National Food Strategy and attacked manufacturers for "misleading" claims that led people to believe they were making a positive health decision

Classic sweets such as Fruit Pastilles and Starburst proudly claim to be “made from fruit juice” on their packaging, even though they contain more than 80 g of sugar per pack

Starburst originals

Classic sweets such as Fruit Pastilles and Starburst proudly claim to be “made from fruit juice” on their packaging, even though they contain more than 80 g of sugar per pack

WHY IS FRUIT JUICE UNHEALTHY?

The sugar in fruit does not have a negative impact on our health, as fruit is full of fiber, which slows down the rate at which sugar is absorbed by the blood.

Dietary fibers also expand the intestine and make you feel fuller, making you less inclined to eat more calories.

When fruit juice turns into fruit, the sugar comes out of the cells and becomes free sugar.

Free sugar is digested extremely quickly and increases the blood sugar level in the body. Regularly increased blood sugar can lead to diabetes and heart problems.

When fruit becomes juice, the fiber is also lost, so you don't feel full and tend to consume more calories.

Eating too many calories leads to weight gain and long-term obesity and a variety of health problems that come with it.

A report from Consumer Watchdog Which? Last October, dozens of children's snacks were found that made similar health claims.

Bear fruit Yoyos Strawberry makes a number of health claims on its packaging, including the fact that it is "pure fruit", contains "one of your five fruits a day" and "contains the same natural sugar as an apple".

Although the snack is made entirely from fruits, the fruits have been processed and mixed to bring them into their yo-yo-like shape.

A strawberry yoyo contains 8 g of free sugar per pack or 42 g of free sugar per 100 g. An apple contains no free sugar and about 10 g total sugar per 100 g.

Similarly, Robinson's Fruit Shoot Fruit Bars claim to be "one of your five a day", "contain no added sugar" and "ideal for lunch boxes".

The snack consists of concentrated strawberry and raspberry juice as well as dates and apples. But because the fruits are processed and reconstituted, the product is stuffed with sugar.

A 25 g bar contains 16 g of sugar, 84 percent of the free sugar that children aged four to six should have in one day, according to the NHS.

Robinsons said, “We would also like to point out that it is not entirely helpful to focus on just one nutrient, in this case sugar, without taking into account what else the food offers.

“For example, many children do not consume enough fiber, which can also be provided by fruit shooters.

"Unlike many other similar fruit snacks, Fruit Shoot bars do not contain added sugar or sweeteners, and the sugar in the bars is naturally occurring sugar from the fruit."

Which? Humzingers also accused Raspberry Fruit Sticks of misleading information on its packaging.

The label says it contains "dried pear, dried grape, dried apple, and dried apricot" – but it doesn't mean that the ingredients need to be mixed or mashed and reformed to make a "stick" out of it.

This process “clears” all sugars in the snack, which corresponds to 52.7 g per 100 g or 6.9 g per minute 13 g serving.

Humzingers said: “In our product, the sugar comes naturally from the dried fruit (96%). We also add a very small percentage of fruit puree that is 100% natural to add moisture and texture to the product.

"The product is lightly compressed cold. No" binders "are added to get a stick shape."

Which? MailOnline said that food manufacturers need to be clearer about the amount of sugar they contain and that they fall under the PHE definition of free sugar.

"Though they contain vitamins and minerals from the fruit, they don't have the same fiber, and the amount of sugar they contain is much closer to candy.

"Like dried fruits, they can stick to your teeth and should not be given as snacks between meals."

MailOnline asked Waitrose, Rowntree & # 39; s and Starburst for a comment.

Simple calculation that shows how many calories you REALLY should eat each day to lose weight

A calorie deficit is the only way to lose weight. That means you need to burn more calories than you consume.

The ideal intake can vary depending on the basal metabolic rate (BMR).

BMR is the amount of calories we use to keep our body going.

Taking your activity levels into account can have a huge impact on how many calories you need to consume.

Your BMR can use a number of & # 39; Macro Calculators & # 39; can be found that are available online.

You take into account your age, your work and your training level.

Once you've calculated your BMR, subtract about 250 calories for steady weight loss or 500 calories for aggressive weight loss.

Additional exercises – such as walking or running on the treadmill – can also be used as an aid to consuming more calories and increasing your calorie deficit.

For example, a brisk 30-minute walk on the treadmill can burn 250 calories.

How to calculate your basal metabolic rate

Women

10-17 years BMR = 13.4 x weight (kg) + 692

18-29 years BMR = 14.8 x weight (kg) + 487

30-59 years BMR = 8.3 x weight (kg) + 846

Men

10-17 years BMR = 17.7 x weight (kg) + 657

18-29 years BMR = 15.1 x weight (kg) + 692

30-58 years BMR = 11.5 x B 8 (kg) + 873

Once you've received your BMR, you'll need to combine it with your activity rate.

Inactive men and women: BMR x 1.4

This applies to everyone whose work is not physically demanding, for example someone who sits at a desk in an office all day. You have no form of structured movement in your life and when you do, it is a low intensity like walking.

Moderately active women: BMR x 1.6

Moderately active men: BMR x 1.7

This applies to someone whose work is physically more intensive or who is concerned with being on their feet a lot. They would also do moderate-intensity structural exercises about three times a week.

Very active women: BMR x 1.8

Very active men: BMR x 1.9

Someone with a very physically demanding job, who also does structured exercises, or someone who trains intensively for one hour a day.

M&S tell pork from Percy Pigs! Leon's restaurant manager blasts Marks & Spencer for sugar in fruit juice candies and calls for free school meals for an additional 1.5 million children while criticizing Britain's "deadly" eating culture

The founder of the Leon restaurant chain has beaten Marks and Spencer over "deliberately misleading" health claims because a government-ordered report calls for an additional 1.5 million children to get free school meals.

The National Food Strategy, led by Henry Dimbleby, said urgent government action is needed in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, and described the country's diet as a "slow-motion disaster."

Mr. Dimbleby attacked Marks & Spencer for his Percy Pig candy, saying that they are marketed on the front as all natural fruit juices and placed "right off your child's little fingers".

He said the first four ingredients listed were sugar forms such as fructose syrup and glucose-fructose syrup. "I just think that's not right," he told reporters during a press conference. "I think that's really misleading.

The Leon founder also said that "healthy" fruity snacks can rot teeth and promote obesity. He said, "Some are dressed in a veneer of goodness if they are no better for you than a Mars bar."

The report warned that poorer children could be "left behind" and added, "One of Covid-19's miserable legacies may be a dramatic increase in unemployment and poverty, and therefore hunger."

"The effects of hunger on young bodies (and minds) are serious and long-lasting and exacerbate social inequalities."

Henry Dimbleby, founder of the Leon chain, led the National Food Strategy

Henry Dimbleby, founder of the Leon chain, led the National Food Strategy

Mr. Dimbleby attacked Marks & Spencer for his Percy Pig sweets and said they would be marketed on the front as all natural fruit juices and placed "straight from your children's little fingers".

Mr. Dimbleby attacked Marks & Spencer for his Percy Pig sweets and said they would be marketed on the front as all natural fruit juices and placed "straight from your children's little fingers".

According to a report by the National Food Strategy, an additional 1.5 million children should be included in the free school lunch program, while poorer adolescents should also be fed during school holidays (Chris Radburn / PA).

According to a report by the National Food Strategy, an additional 1.5 million children should be included in the free school lunch program, while poorer adolescents should also be fed during school holidays (Chris Radburn / PA).

The study suggests extending free school meals to every child with one parent receiving universal credit, adding: "Children who are hungry at school find it difficult to concentrate, perform poorly, and have worse attendance lists to have."

Currently only household children who earn less than £ 7,400 before benefits are eligible.

The expansion of the program could reach an additional 1.5 million seven to 16 year olds at a cost of £ 670 million a year.

The report also calls for the holiday activity and nutrition program to be extended to all areas in England, reaching an additional 1.1 million children at a cost of £ 200 million a year.

And it is highly recommended to increase the value of Healthy Start vouchers to £ 4.25 per week and to extend the program to pregnant women and households receiving universal credit on children under the age of four.

The coupons can be spent on vitamins, fruits, vegetables, and milk, and the recommendation would mean that an additional 290,000 pregnant women and children under the age of four would benefit, the study said.

Mr. Dimbleby said that the managers of Waitrose and the cooperative had already agreed to add additional free fruit and vegetables to the vouchers.

He welcomed the government's obesity strategy, released on Monday, but said that some companies need to review their actions when it comes to developing foods that appeal to children.

The report points to "misleading packaging" and accuses the food industry of "clothing itself and its products in wrong virtue".

Mr. Dimbleby attacked Marks & Spencer for his Percy Pig candy, saying that they are marketed on the front as all natural fruit juices and placed "right off your child's little fingers".

And yet, he said, the first four ingredients listed are forms of sugar like fructose syrup and glucose-fructose syrup.

"I just think that's not right," he told reporters during a press conference.

"I think that's really misleading.

"And indeed, when you look at the food world, the reason I choose M&S is that they have integrity as one of their values, but it's widespread in the food world – you know, low fat (food), which is actually high in sugar or free of this and that.

“I think CEOs have to respond to commercial pressures, but they're not innocent, they're in the waters of the trade, and they can't make value-based decisions.

"I think you have to look at what you're doing. I think that the directors in these companies could very quickly improve the system significantly if they asked these questions without the need for government regulation.

"I think it's time to find that you've stuck your head in the sand for too long."

Mr Dimbleby, who said he was struggling with his own weight, said he agreed that some fruit snacks "are dressed in a veneer of goodness and may not be better for you than a Mars bar".

And he said there was "potential" to "use taxes to change the formulation of food".

But he said he disagreed with simple candy packaging and said most people he spoke to felt that this was too much for government intervention.

He urged the government to quickly implement the report's recommendations.

"This will improve the nation's health and be a necessary pillar of their efforts to improve society," he said.

The study also asked the government to only cut tariffs on products that meet the UK's "core standards".

This would be achieved through "verification programs" that allow American farmers to sell non-hormone-treated meat to the UK, for example.

Certification systems should also be expanded if the environmental impact is severe. For example, the study states that tariffs will be maintained for beef raised on land that was recently cleared from the rainforest.

Susan Jebb, Professor of Nutrition and Population Health at Oxford University, who worked on the report, said: “Poor quality nutrition is the main risk factor for disease in the UK, but we do not treat it with the same seriousness that other risk factors have. That needs to change.

& # 39; The Covid-19 pandemic was a wake-up call that obesity in particular increases the risk of serious complications from the virus, but poor nutrition also increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

"This report highlights the seriousness of the situation and the strong inequalities that are evident across the food system."

Environment Minister George Eustice said the entire food supply chain had "worked 24 hours a day" during the pandemic, while "the government has invested record values ​​to support the most vulnerable in our society".

"However, we know there is more to be done and we will carefully review this independent report and its recommendations as we emerge from the pandemic and build a stronger food system for the future," he added.

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