TOP TRENDING

Suburban Housewives mobilize against Trump on Facebook after the president promised to win her vote


Suburban housewives across America are mobilizing against Donald Trump after the president promised he would win their support in November.

Trump claimed in a tweet on Wednesday that "suburban housewives" would vote for him for ending a program that allowed low-income homes to "invade their neighborhoods."

He accused his rival Joe Biden of reinstalling this program in a "larger form" under the direction of Democratic Senator Cory Booker.

"The 'suburban housewife' will vote for me," said the president.

The tweet was quickly criticized by critics who viewed it as a racist dog whistle, including some of the women he claimed were pleased with the program's end.

In the days that followed, several Facebook groups surfaced with self-identifying suburban housewives who vowed to make sure Trump doesn't see a second term.

Suburban housewives across America are mobilizing against Donald Trump after the president promised he would win their support in November

Trump claimed in a tweet on Wednesday that

Trump claimed in a tweet on Wednesday that "suburban housewives" would vote for him for ending a program that allowed low-income homes to "invade their neighborhoods."

Following Trump's tweet, several Facebook groups have teamed up with self-identifying suburban housewives who have vowed to ensure Trump doesn't see a second term

Following Trump's tweet, several Facebook groups have teamed up with self-identifying suburban housewives who have vowed to ensure Trump doesn't see a second term

A group called Suburban Housewives Against Trump has brought together more than 8,100 members since it was formed hours after the president's controversial tweet.

"Donald Trump used sexist language to describe us as 'suburban housewives'," the description reads. & # 39; He also said we would vote for him. He's wrong. & # 39;

The group was founded by Loni Yeary Gentry, a mother of three from Florence, Kentucky.

Yeary Gentry explained to the Daily Beast that she wanted to give Trump critics in her largely conservative community a space to speak freely about the upcoming election.

She said she was surprised that group members included several mothers from their children's Catholic private school who she thought would support Trump.

"I think people can make assumptions," said Yeary Gentry. “And I think unfortunately the president did that, assuming that all white women would support him. And we are not. & # 39;

Loni Yeary Gentry, a mother of three from Kentucky, founded a Facebook group called "Suburban Housewives" Against Trump on Wednesday, which now has more than 8,100 members

Middle-aged white women proved extremely important in the 2016 election, when Trump won 53 percent of the vote in that category.

However, recent polls suggest that Trump's support for women in suburbs is much lower than last time.

A recent NPR / PBS poll found that 66 percent of suburban women overall disapproved of Trump's work – 58 percent said they strongly disapproved of it.

Other polls have found that Trump lags Biden by up to 25 percentage points among female voters.

Mary Hayes, a mother of three from Virginia, started a Facebook group called The Real Suburban Housewives for Biden / Harris.

Mary Hayes, a mother of three from Virginia, started a Facebook group called The Real Suburban Housewives for Biden / Harris.

Trump is keen to win the decisive vote in the suburbs this year and has sent more than a dozen female surrogates to the suburbs over the past year. He has used his stance on law and order to convince families that he is the candidate for the safety of their communities.

However, this strategy seems to backfire as the suburban areas have become more diverse.

That's an argument from Mary Hayes, a black mother of three from Virginia who started a Facebook group called The Real Suburban Housewives for Biden / Harris.

Hayes said Trump managed to alienate a large portion of suburban voters with racist comments aimed at addressing housewives like them.

Trump recognized the growing diversity of suburban areas when he was asked what he meant by his "invasion" tweet at a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

"What I mean is (Biden and Harris) areas of your neighborhood are going to develop what they are already doing and now they want to expand," he said.

& # 39; And they will expand it. They will destroy the suburbs in my opinion. & # 39;

Trump was referring to the Promoting Fair Housing Rule, a policy developed under President Barack Obama that aimed to prevent discrimination based on housing. Biden has agreed to follow the rule.

When Trump responded to claims that his tweet had racist overtones, he found that 30 percent of people living in suburbs are minorities.

"And for you to understand, more than 30 percent of the people living in the suburbs are minorities," he said. & # 39; African American, Asian American, Hispanic American. They are minorities, 30 percent. & # 39;

Trump recognized the growing diversity of suburban areas when he was asked at a press conference on Wednesday afternoon what he meant by his "invasion" tweet (picture).

Trump recognized the growing diversity of suburban areas when he was asked at a press conference on Wednesday afternoon what he meant by his "invasion" tweet (picture).

Hayes responded to Trump's comments by telling the Daily Beast, & # 39; He might as well have said, "The white housewife is going to vote for me because I've kept the low income (the people) or the minorities or how Anyway you want to say it from your neighborhood. "& # 39;

"You can't get someone's vote and want to drop certain people in the same community," added Hayes.

Some white women, the perceived target of Trump's tweet, also declined to use the term "suburban housewife".

“I think I'm a suburban housewife, but I definitely don't feel that way,” Jaime Spataro, a Philadelphia suburb mother, told the Daily Beast.

Spataro founded her own Facebook group "Suburban Housewives for Biden / Harris" with more than 4,200 members.

"When I hear the term 'suburban housewife' I think of a woman in an apron dress in the 1950s who sucks with a cocktail for her husband when he comes home from work at 5:30 am," Spataro said. "It's so antiquated and out of date."

The makers of anti-Trump groups hope to give all of their peers the opportunity to discuss political issues instead of just sharing liberal messages with people who already intend to vote for Biden.

They say they have already seen a change among women who previously voted for Trump – and that many more of their colleagues are on the fence.

Yeary Gentry said even her mother, who hasn't voted blue since Jimmy Carter, decided not to vote for Trump this year.

"She didn't like him then, but she despises him now," said Yeary Gentry. "And she'll vote for Biden this time."

A poll published by the Wall Street Journal / NBC News on Sunday found that 50 percent of U.S. voters intend to vote for Biden this November, compared with 41 percent who support Trump

A poll published by the Wall Street Journal / NBC News on Sunday found that 50 percent of U.S. voters intend to vote for Biden this November, compared with 41 percent who support Trump

While various polls have shown that Biden has a huge lead among female voters, it's important to note that this was also said three months before the 2016 election.

An August 2016 poll by ABC News / Washington Post found that Clinton leads Trump among women by 23 points.

However, when it came down to it, Trump won more than half of the white female votes.

Many Republicans have insisted that "silent" voters reappear in this year's election, who will go undetected until November 3rd.

Tiffany Blythe, a mom who stays at home in North Carolina and plans to vote red in November, told the New York Times this week that she knows many Trump supporters who are nervous about talking about who they will vote for.

Because of this, Blythe doesn't trust the polls that predict a big win for Biden.

"I'm not going to buy it," said Blythe. & # 39; There are many silent voters and more will come out before the elections. I think a lot of states are turning red from blue, but you don't hear about that in the media. & # 39;

Trump himself has made this argument repeatedly, including on Saturday when he told reporters: "We have a silent majority that has never been seen before."

But the woman behind the latest “suburban housewives” Facebook groups sends a clear message: We are not in your silent majority.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Messages (t) Joe Biden (t) Donald Trump