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Students must pay £ 150 to achieve A-Level results


Affected high school graduates today have to pay hundreds of pounds to get results on exams they couldn't even take.

Thousands of teenagers across the country were desperate after missing college seats after their exam scores were recorded.

Now they will have to pay fees of up to £ 150 per exam if they want to appeal. This means it can cost up to £ 600 for a student to notice four notes.

The School and University Directors' Association said it would prefer "fees that are not charged for appeal procedures" given the "unusual circumstances" schools face.

A group of protesters, including students who graduated from high school on Thursday, marched to the Department of Education building in Whitehall, central London today.

Thousands of teenagers across the country face fees of up to £ 150 per exam if they want to appeal

Thousands of teenagers across the country face fees of up to £ 150 per exam if they want to appeal

A group of protesters, including students who graduated from high school on Thursday, marched down Whitehall to the Department of Education building in central London

A group of protesters, including students who graduated from high school on Thursday, marched down Whitehall to the Department of Education building in central London

How does the appointment process work?

The government faces a storm after nearly 40 percent of results were downgraded by the computer model used when exams were canceled due to the coronavirus crisis.

On Results Day, students and schools began to complain about the statistical mechanism for awarding grades – which it is alleged to have wrongly punished some.

The appeal process for this summer does not correspond to the usual reviews of the outcome process.

It is not possible to take grades unless the schools meet certain criteria set by Ofqual.

Many now want to address their grades. This is how the process works:

Students:

  • You can ask your school or college to check if there was an administrative error in submitting the centre's grade or position in the ranking and, if so, to file a complaint with the Board of Examiners

Reasons for appointments for schools and universities::

  • Procedure: The registry was not applying the procedures consistently or the procedures were not followed properly and fairly
  • Wrong data: The registry used the wrong data when calculating the results
  • Result output incorrectly: The registration office incorrectly issued the result to one or more applicants.

The complaint:

  • LEVEL 1: First review: During the inIn the first review phase, the selection board will check that the correct data has been used and that the correct procedure has been followed, depending on your grounds of appeal.
  • LEVEL 2: Independent verification: If you are not satisfied with the outcome of your initial review, you can move on to the next stage of the appeal process, which is an independent review.

An independent decision maker not directly employed by (AQA () will examine your case.

Your request for an independent review must be submitted within 14 calendar days of the submission of the initial review result.

Seat exams in autumn:

AQA recommends that in cases where the school or college appeals on a student's behalf, the student also stands for the appropriate exam in the fall series.

This is due to the tight deadlines for entering the Fall Series and the processing time required for an appointment. This way, a student who is not satisfied with the outcome of the calling can take the exam to improve their grade.

Almost 40 percent of the results were downgraded by the computer model used when exams were canceled due to the coronavirus crisis.

The government announced late Tuesday that A-Level and GCSE students could use the results in valid mock exams to appeal if they are dissatisfied with their results.

However, schools, colleges and universities are still unclear how the new appointment process will work and what the likely timeframe will be.

Ofqual, the UK Examination Board, has said it is "urgently" working to explain how bogus exam results will form the basis for an appeal. However, further details will not be announced until next week.

Students cannot appeal the results directly, but must do so through the director of their college or school.

According to Ofqual, schools can challenge grades on behalf of their students even if they can demonstrate that grades are "lower than expected because previous cohorts are not sufficiently representative of this year's students".

AQA, the largest provider of GCSEs and degrees in England, charges schools £ 25 for every appeal that is unsuccessful in the “Initial Exam” phase.

The fee increases to £ 111.75 if the "exceptional circumstances" complaint is filed.

Appeals that fail the independent review will be charged at £ 111.75.

OCR will charge £ 9.50 per student for each unsuccessful initial exam, with a limit of £ 95.

Schools will then have to pay £ 150 for any independent verification that is not verified.

Edexcel does not charge schools for initial exams due to errors in the center, but does charge £ 20 per student for unsuccessful initial exams due to the Examination Board making a mistake, up to a limit of £ 120 per subject.

Failed initial exams due to "exceptional circumstances" will be charged £ 120.

Appeals that fail in the second phase of independent verification will be charged at £ 150.

Under siege students posted on social media today and are scared as they stand before an appeal.

One wrote: "Given the A * AA in the teacher rating that AAA had in ridicules, I thought my offers for medical school were assured, but the system leaves no room for a very high-performing cohort in a high-performing school.

“And that's only if my calling is successful. If not, I'll be forced to take a year off and pay to retake exams that I've never taken, possibly twice, because after five months without a degree it will be massively difficult for level A exams in one month to be ready in October. & # 39;

Ofqual has confirmed that due to the protection of grades, no grades will drop due to an appeal this year – as could normally be the case in the appeal process.

Meanwhile, Oxford University applicants who successfully appeal their A-Level results have been told that they may have to wait a year before they can begin their studies.

Some students who achieve top grades after questioning their results could postpone their place in Oxford until the fall of 2021 when the facility reaches maximum capacity.

The university has stated that if the maximum number of students were exceeded, it would not be possible to cope with the "persistent social distancing restrictions" and other challenges posed by Covid-19.

The Examination Authority faces tens of thousands of appeals

According to Schools Week, last year's appeal fees cost up to £ 148.30 for a preliminary appeal and up to £ 211.80 for an appeal hearing, meaning a school can pay up to £ 360.10 per appeal.

Last year, the examination boards received 1,254 complaints, 46 percent more than in the previous year when there were 857 complaints.

Of the 1,254 appeals last year, 683 were confirmed and 426 resulted in a grade change.

But those numbers are set to skyrocket this year as thousands of students see lower than expected results.

The move comes after University Secretary Michelle Donelan told universities to hold spots for applicants who challenge the A-level grades until they get the result of their appeal.

At the suggestion that some applicants could be asked to reschedule their spots until 2021 if they appeal, Shadow Health Minister Justin Madders tweeted, "Haven't these kids been through enough?"

The Ucas deadline for applicants to meet their academic listing requirements ends on September 7th. The examination boards have less than four weeks to report the results of the complaints.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, told Schools Week, “In the unusual circumstances this year, we would prefer fees that are not applied to appeal procedures.

“This would ensure that there is a level playing field so that the ability to appeal is not constrained by the resources available.

"It would help give people an extra level of confidence in the fairness of the process."

AQA said: "We have always said that we do not want to benefit financially from this summer's special regulations. That is why we are already reimbursing 26% of the examination fees, which can be used for any appeal costs."

Ofqual examination board has stated that schools will be able to challenge grades on behalf of their students even if they can demonstrate that grades are "lower than expected because previous cohorts are not sufficiently representative of this year's students" .

Ofqual examination board has stated that schools will be able to challenge grades on behalf of their students even if they can demonstrate that grades are "lower than expected because previous cohorts are not sufficiently representative of this year's students" .

Around 100 protesters gathered outside Downing Street today and sang "Sack Gavin Williamson" and "Teachers Not Tories" while holding placards

Around 100 protesters gathered outside Downing Street today and sang "Sack Gavin Williamson" and "Teachers Not Tories" while holding placards

Around 100 protesters gathered outside Downing Street today and sang "Sack Gavin Williamson" and "Teachers Not Tories" while holding placards.

Harry Mayes, a student from Stoke Newington, North London, missed a place in both his company and insurance college after getting A, B and C in high school.

The 18-year-old, who had hoped to study neuroscience at the University of Bristol and received grades A *, A and B from his teachers, described the system as "utter injustice".

"I'm a free student for school lunches and it seems like people like me have been lowered the most," he said.

A-LEVEL RESULTS: WHAT'S NEXT FOR STUDENTS?

After the release of this year's A-Level results for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, many students will ponder their future.

The disruption of the examination process caused by the coronavirus pandemic has created great uncertainty throughout the education system.

Here is a breakdown of this year's results and next steps for students to consider:

How were the results this year?

According to the official data for England, Wales and Northern Ireland, there have been some record results.

The share of contributions with the grade A or higher rose to an all-time high of 27.9% and thus by 2.4 points compared to the previous year.

Another record was the success rate (grades A * to E), which reached 98.3% from 97.6%.

But was this all good news for the students?

No, thousands saw their results downgraded by a new moderation process put in place after the Covid-19 crisis resulted in exams being canceled.

Students were given a calculated grade based on teachers providing predicted grades alongside a ranking of students.

Similar data suggest that around 280,000 A-level entries in England have been adjusted from the teachers' original predictions.

How did people react?

The School and University Directors' Association said it was very concerned about the "volatility" of the results.

Secretary-General Geoff Barton said he had heard "heartbreaking" reports from schools that grades had been lowered in "completely unfair and unfathomable" ways.

One headmistress said she was "quite outraged" that some students are now banned from going to the university of their choice after the results were downgraded by up to two grades.

Can unhappy students question their results?

In England the government has outlined a "triple lock" process that could help students improve their scores.

This would allow a student to either accept their calculated grade, get a valid mock score, or take a new exam in the fall.

How do vocations work?

In England, Northern Ireland and Wales, students can ask their school or college to check if there was an administrative error in submitting their grade – and they can ask them to appeal.

However, individual students cannot submit their grades directly to the examination boards – this must be done by a school or college on their behalf.

The exception is in Wales, where private candidates can appeal directly to the Examination Board.

Ofqual's aforementioned results can be well received when a school has lower grades than expected because previous cohorts are not “representative” of this year's students.

According to the Examination Board, schools and colleges can appeal if they can demonstrate that historical data on the standardization of grades is not a reliable indicator of this year's results due to changing circumstances.

For example, this could be because a school has experienced a “significant change in leadership or leadership” or a “monumental event” such as a flood or fire.

Schools and colleges can also appeal if they believe they made a mistake in submitting a grade or if they believe an examination board made a mistake.

Are there differences between the nations?

In Scotland, protests from students this week resulted in the SNP government accepting teacher-valued results after thousands of higher grades were downgraded.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson has ruled out a similar U-turn in England.

Wales uses a different model than Scotland, with almost half of a student's final grade being based on AS levels completed in the previous year.

The Welsh government has expressed confidence that grades will be 'robust', despite fears that students who have not done well in the past will be wrongly penalized.

In Northern Ireland, results are based on teacher predictions and statistical models.

The review panel, the Curriculum, Exams and Assessment Council, said students will have more leeway to appeal against A-Level and GCSE grades.

How do bogus results come into play?

It's not entirely clear yet.

Mr Williamson said Ofqual will "provide clarity" on how bogus exams – which were conducted before schools were forced to close amid the pandemic – can lay the groundwork for an appeal.

Ofqual announced to reporters Thursday that this could be until early next week, if not before.

Students' concern is how seriously they took mock exams.

How will the exams work later this year?

The government has announced that it will provide a support package to help schools cover the cost of taking new exams in the fall.

This includes booking venues, hiring supervisors, and paying exam fees if they exceed discounts granted this summer.

Much will depend on how the pandemic develops and whether further restrictions on social distancing or re-bans affect exam schedules again.

How does this affect applications to universities?

According to the Ucas admissions service, more students have been enrolled in UK courses this year.

A total of 358,860 applicants were accepted – an increase of 2.9% compared to 2019.

Of these, 316,730 were accepted in their first choice, an increase of 2.7% compared to the previous year.

Ministers had asked universities to take a "flexible" approach to assessing applications, with institutions being instructed to fill student places pending appeal.

However, the examination boards have less than four weeks to deal with complaints. The Ucas deadline ends on September 7th to allow applicants to meet their academic offer requirements.

What about clearing?

So far this year 7,600 people have found a place through clearing.

Mr Williamson said that a "late clearing process" is expected for students taking high school exams this fall.

He said talks are being held with the university sector so that students may be able to start university in January rather than the usual September / October time.

Equal blame on teachers: regulators say "implausibly high" predicted grades for A-level students are behind the chaos of the exams as Starmer calls for a U-turn along the Scottish lines and the equality watchdog threatens to intervene

By James Tapsfield Political Editor for MailOnline

Ofqual accused teachers of suggesting "implausibly high" A-Level grades today when Keir Starmer joined the backlash in demanding that standardization is no longer possible.

The government faces a storm after nearly 40 percent of results were downgraded by the computer model used when exams were canceled due to the coronavirus crisis.

Boris Johnson and Education Secretary Gavin Williamson have defended the result as "robust" and "credible", while Ofqual has indicated that there would have been massive inflation had the moderation not been applied.

But Sir Keir turned up the heat today by asking England to follow Scotland's lead by scrapping standardization entirely and relying on teachers' estimates.

"The unprecedented and chaotic circumstances created by the UK government's misuse of education in recent months mean that a return to teacher assessments is now the best option available," said the Labor leader.

“No young person should be disadvantaged because of government incompetence.

& # 39; Time is running out. We need action in days, not weeks. & # 39;

When the big U-turn in Scotland was performed on a similar computer model, the higher success rate increased 14 percentage points year over year.

In the meantime, the equality watchdog has threatened to intervene unless Ofqual ensures that children from disadvantaged backgrounds and minorities do not miss out.

Sir Keir Starmer ((pictured visiting Darlington yesterday) has urged the government to emulate the U-turn in Scotland's A-level rating

Sir Keir Starmer ((pictured visiting Darlington yesterday) has urged the government to emulate the U-turn in Scotland's A-level rating

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson had come under pressure to address the "great injustice" of the 2020 results by school principals and the Labor Party

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson had come under pressure to address the "great injustice" of the 2020 results by school principals and the Labor Party

Data showed that poorer students in England were more likely to be downgraded by the algorithm

The data showed that poorer students in England were more likely to be downgraded by the algorithm

No apologies from Boris Johnson as he insists the results are "robust".

Boris Johnson has insisted that the exam results released today are "robust" and "reliable".

The Prime Minister said, “Well, first of all let me say that I want to congratulate all of the students who have worked so hard to get the grades that they have and that they did so well.

“And let's have no doubt, the exam results we have today are robust, they are good, they are reliable for employers, but I already think that there are a record number of candidates, of students, who can do theirs complete the first elective course at the university of your choice.

"Also, there is a record number of students, students from disadvantaged backgrounds, who can now go to university because of those grades."

Mr Johnson also said he had confidence in Education Secretary Gavin Williamson.

He said, “I think obviously it would be very difficult if there weren't any formal exams this year like we usually have because of the virus. We had to use the system we have.

“I think it's robust and like I said, a couple of things that I think are very important – first, more students than ever can go to the university of their choice to take the course of their choice.

"And when it comes to children, disadvantaged students can go to university more than ever. This year they are going to university based on the grades they have today."

When asked if he had confidence in Mr. Williamson, he said, “Of course, but I think this is a robust system that is reliable for employers.

"It is very important that in the years to come people should be able to look at these grades and find them robust and reliable."

Ofqual had estimated that if only teachers' ratings were used, the A-Level pass rate would be 12 points higher.

And a spokesman told the Telegraph today that "the standard used by different schools and colleges is very different".

"A few centers have given implausibly high judgments, including one in which all A * and A grades were submitted for students in two subjects in which a normal distribution had previously taken place," said the spokesman.

After the 2020 exams were canceled due to the coronavirus, this year's grades were calculated using a statistical model that takes into account student performance in the past along with their school's historical grades and a ranking created by teachers.

However, on Results Day, students and schools began to complain about the statistical mechanism for awarding marks – which it is alleged to have wrongly punished some.

Several sixth grade college students were demoted after getting the best predicted grades.

Wiktoria Sniadowska said she would "definitely" appeal after a computer algorithm just cut her on the BBC. She is continuing her studies at Leyton Sixth Form College, London, where she will earn an Art Foundation Diploma.

But she said, “I know if I had taken my exams I would have got better grades. It's unjust. & # 39;

Tamzin Iyayi lost a place in Cambridge after being removed from A * AA in history, law and politics. She said, "I just feel disappointed in the government."

Aqsa Ali was offered places to study politics and international relations. But she missed it after downgrading a B in Politics and a C in History and Religious Studies.

She said, "It has a huge impact on my sanity and confidence."

Elsewhere, a young supervisor had lowered his high school diploma by up to three grades, which cast doubt on his university plans.

Maks Ovnik looks after his grandmother 102 alongside his mother on the Isle of Wight. He got ABB in his ridicules and his school gave him AAB in math, computers and physics.

However, these have been downgraded from Ofqual to ADE, meaning that he will lose his place to study physics in Southampton.

Appeal 18-year-old Maks believes his scores were downgraded based on his school's performance last year. He said, "It's not a nice feeling at all."

Students burn their A-Level scores in the London Dungeon while they find out if they have a place to study

Students burn their A-Level scores in the London Dungeon while they find out if they have a place to study

Important statistics for this year's A-Level results

  • The proportion of candidates who receive top marks is the highest ever recorded. A total of 27.9% of participants achieved either an A or an A *, up from 25.5% in 2019.
  • About 9.0% of the participants received an A *. This is another record high, up from 7.8% last year.
  • The general success rate (grades A * to E) was 98.3% – another record high. It is up from 97.6% in 2019.
  • 78.4% received a C or higher, up from 75.8% in 2019 and the highest value since at least 2000.
  • Girls have expanded their lead over boys in the top grades. The proportion of girls with A or higher was 28.4%, 1.1 percentage points more than that of boys (27.3%). Last year, girls led boys by just 0.1 percentage points (25.5% girls, 25.4% boys). After a long time in which girls were ahead, the boys briefly took over the lead in 2017 and 2018.
  • The gap between top performing boys and girls has narrowed slightly. The proportion of boys who received A * was 9.3%, 0.5 percentage points higher than that of girls (8.8%). Last year the gap was 0.7 points.
  • The most popular subject this year was math. It was adopted by 94,168 participants, an increase of 2.5% compared to 2019.
  • Psychology was the second most popular subject and overtook biology. It was attended by 65,255 participants, an increase of 1.0% compared to 2019. Biology became the third most popular subject, which was attended by 65,057 participants, which corresponds to a decrease of 6.0%.
  • ICT (information and communication technology) saw the largest drop in candidates for a single subject, with more than 1,000 participants, falling by 15.3% from 1,572 to 1,332.
  • Computing saw the largest increase in candidates of all subjects, with more than 1,000 attendees, rising 11.7% from 11,124 to 12,426.
  • 780,557 Abitur examinations were awarded, which corresponds to a decrease of 2.6% compared to the previous year's figure (801,002) and the lowest number since 2004.

Rebecca Hilsenrath, Director General of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, said there must be no disproportionate impact on already disadvantaged groups.

“Many of these children come from disadvantaged backgrounds. If we want to take better steps back and not make things worse, it has to start with our children's future, ”she said.

& # 39; We made it clear to Ofqual that they need to consider the equality impact of all their actions and mitigate any negative impact they may have on these groups.

"Ofqual should understand the implications of the algorithm used in the standardization model and the steps to remove bias and account for equality."

She added, “Students who have been demoted must be able to appeal directly if they believe their grades are unfair.

"We will continue to discuss this with Ofqual and take into account all of our powers so that, for example, ethnic minorities and disabled children are treated fairly in this process."

In a round of interviews this morning, Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps said that more students from disadvantaged backgrounds were admitted to the university than last year.

When asked if he would accept that poorer students are the hardest hit by the demotion, Mr Shapps told BBC Breakfast, “No, I think you should revisit the evidence here – that was not the result.

“I looked at the numbers and 18 year olds from the most disadvantaged backgrounds. Based on yesterday's exam results, 7.3 percent more go to the university and were admitted to the university than last year. & # 39;

He added, “The figures show that both disadvantaged and the total number of students who confirmed 9,000 more places than last year have already admitted 179,000 18-year-olds to the university, so the numbers look in terms of good students who can go to university this year. & # 39;

Moderator Charlie Stayt suggested Mr Shapps devalue statistics showing that children from the most deprived areas are most likely to be downgraded.

Mr. Shapps replied, "I don't (discount it), it's just that I'm reading a recent statistic – 7.3 percent more disadvantaged children, 18-year-olds, took this up at university than last year, which prompted you come back and say i disagree but you don't give me numbers.

“So yes, I think more students from disadvantaged backgrounds are going to university and overall, as I say, more have been accepted into the university than before.

“Look, these are the numbers. If you have other numbers tell me, but these are the numbers that I have in front of me. «

Left to right: Wiktoria Sniadowska, Tamzin Iyayi and Aqsa Ali. Wiktoria said she would "definitely" appeal after a computer algorithm just cut her on the BBC

Left to right: Wiktoria Sniadowska, Tamzin Iyayi and Aqsa Ali. Wiktoria said she would "definitely" appeal after a computer algorithm just cut her on the BBC

Besides his mother, Maks Ovnik looks after his grandmother 102 on the Isle of Wight

Besides his mother, Maks Ovnik looks after his grandmother 102 on the Isle of Wight

A-level trends: Farewell to general studies, as girls are more boys than boys in science

Here are six trends in this year's A-Level results, from topics that bowed down to those on the way up:

– General farewell studies

This year there were no entries for general A-level studies. Ten years ago there were 46,770. The topic declined before it was officially unavailable as a high school graduation in 2017, although there were still 41 entries last year. Two other topics have also passed: communication studies and critical thinking. Both had around 2,000 entries 10 years ago.

– Spanish on the rise

Last year Spanish overtook French to become the most popular language at A-level. This year the gap has widened: Spanish entries rose 0.9% while French entries fell 1.1%. Deutsch recorded an even steeper decline, falling 6.2% and falling below 3,000 entries for the first time.

– Drama and music on the way down

Entries for music have decreased 43% since 2010, while drama has decreased 42%. Both have spent most of the past decade in decline. Drama fell 6% between 2019 and 2020, while music fell 3%.

– There are more girls than boys in science

For the second year in a row, there were more female than male entries in the natural sciences. When the numbers for biology, chemistry and physics are combined, girls accounted for 80,854 entries (50.9%) and for boys 78,122 (49.1%). Although boys continue to dominate physics (77% of entries), girls make up the majority of entries for both biology (64%) and chemistry (54%).

– Computing has the greatest imbalance between the sexes

While most of the entries for physics were from boys, it wasn't the topic that showed the greatest imbalance between the sexes versus men. That was computers where boys made up 86% of the entries and girls made up 14%. The largest imbalance towards women was in the performing / expressive arts, where girls made up 90% of the posts and boys only 10%.

– Psychology is superior to biology

The most popular subject this year was mathematics (94,168 entries), as it had been in recent years. In second place, however, there was a change: Psychology (65,255 entries) overtook biology (65,057 entries). Psychology has risen around 10,000 entries since 2014, and that – plus a drop in biology entries this year of around 4,000 from last year – allowed it to take second place.

Mr Williamson had come under pressure to address the "great injustice" of the 2020 results by school principals and the Labor Party after data showed that poorer students in England were more likely to be downgraded by the algorithm.

Sources close to Mr. Williamson say there will be no U-turn, adding that the model used was the fairest way to deal with the matter, given the circumstances.

They highlighted Ofqual numbers, which showed that almost twice as many students would receive A * s as in previous years if "optimistic" grades were received.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has written to Mr Williamson saying that he was "very concerned about the publication and the issues surrounding (this year's) A-level results".

He said, “The last minute government decision to revise A-Level grading options is the last in a series of confusing exam announcements at a time when students need clarity and security.

“I am particularly concerned about underprivileged students in government sixth grade and secondary schools who are losing disproportionately.

“It is imperative that ministers now provide clear information on the grade challenge process to ensure that every teenager receives a grade that reflects their efforts and skills, both this week with high school graduation and next week with GCSEs .

“I urge you, on behalf of the next generation in London, to examine what Scotland has done, admit mistakes have been made and ensure that teachers' assessments are properly taken into account, as these are altogether a far fairer way of attributing offer grades compared to what we saw today.

"I would appreciate your urgent response to this letter."

A government source said, “There are always people who don't get their predicted grades. Die Leute scheinen mit der Vorstellung zu arbeiten, dass jeder nur das bekommen sollte, was seine Lehrer denken, dass er hätte haben sollen. & # 39;

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