ENTERTAINMENT

Student jailed for 3 years with Al Qaeda bomb-making guide on the phone


The 26-year-old would-be jihadi student has been jailed for three years after being caught by an al-Qaeda leader using his cell phone to "make a bomb in your mother's kitchen"

  • Salim Youssoufi had made copies of various issues of the Al-Qaeda magazine
  • The 26-year-old Italian national downloaded material in Italy before arriving in the UK
  • West Midlands police once found "dangerous" material on his cell phone in the UK
  • An article in the magazine described the making of a rolling-blade machine for "mowing the enemies of Allah", which has been called "the ultimate mower."
  • He was detained at Birmingham Crown Court for three years after convicted of four offenses of possession of records containing terrorist information

A former student caught with al-Qaeda magazines on his cell phone including "How to Make a Bomb in Your Mother's Kitchen" has been detained for three years.

Salim Youssoufi of Coventry Road, Small Heath claimed that he downloaded the documents "out of curiosity".

The 26-year-old was found guilty on four counts of possession of records containing terrorist information. after trying.

The former electronics and telecommunications student traveled to the UK in September 2019 and moved to his Small Heath address with his wife three months before his arrest.

Birmingham Crown Court heard that the Italian national was arrested on December 13 and that his cell phone was confiscated by West Midlands Police.

"That phone had four documents – electronic files – that contained terrorist information," said Matthew Brook, prosecuting the charges.

Salim Youssoufi, a 26-year-old Italian national, was imprisoned for three years after found guilty of holding information that could be of use to a terrorist who telephoned in the UK

He said Youssoufi made copies of various issues of al-Qaeda’s Inspire magazine. One had a front page titled, "Make a bomb in your mother's kitchen."

Another article described the creation of a rolling-blade machine to "mow down the enemies of Allah" which has been called "the ultimate mower".

Another article referred to the "destruction of buildings" with explosives and gas cylinders, while another highlighted the September 2010 bombing of a UPS cargo plane.

The court heard that Islamic State propaganda video showing an execution was also found on the phone of the former electronics and telecommunications student.

In a temporary verdict, Judge Paul Farrer QC said: “In February 2019 you were living in Italy and at that time you held extreme Islamic views, including the fact that your religion has been attacked by Western countries and it was the duty of all Muslims to protect it to fight . & # 39;

He said on March 19 that the defendant had sent encrypted WhatsApp messages in which he stated his wish to fight in Syria.

Youssufi had also made a record pledging allegiance to Daesh after being urged to do so by an agent outside the UK as part of his engagement with the terrorist organization, although he initially denied it in his police interview.

The court heard that Youssoufi also had talks with a man who was later convicted of terrorist offenses in Italy.

The judge said Youssoufi downloaded the magazines in Italy between June and September 2019 but accepted that he did not access them after arriving in the UK.

Salim Youssoufi, a student, was detained at Birmingham Crown Court for three years after convicted of four offenses of possession of records containing terrorist information

Salim Youssoufi, a student, was detained at Birmingham Crown Court for three years after convicted of four offenses of possession of records containing terrorist information

But he said, “You were looking for these documents instead of stumbling over them. You did this because at the time it was in line with the extreme views you were holding. «

Anya Lewis, who defended herself, said there had been some levels of exploitation by others.

"He was the less demanding party in the WhatsApp conversations," she said.

Commenting on the case, Det Ch Supt Kenny Bell, Head of CTP West Midlands CTU, said: “In an interview with the police, Youssufi claimed that he was looking for the documents out of curiosity, but it is clear that he knowingly downloaded and possessed these illegal documents got with very annoying and dangerous content.

“We will continue to protect local communities by working with partners and the CPS to prosecute and prosecute anyone who wants to show support for terrorism or spread hatred and terror.

“We work tirelessly to fight terrorism. Our absolute priority is to ensure the safety of the people who live, work and visit in the West Midlands region. & # 39;

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