ENTERTAINMENT

Storm Ellen SAVAGES Summer: 900 mile wide storm at 75 mph storm hits Great Britain


The British were hit by pouring rain and gales of 120 km / h today as Storm Ellen wreaked promising two days of chaos.

The 900 mile wide storm lashed 15 feet of waves and flooded roads as staycationers faced the mayhem in the midst of the first named storm, which hit the school summer break.

Millions of people who have taken breaks from home in the UK face demolished tents, power outages and travel disruptions as winds normally seen in winter roll through the area.

Ellen, Britain's worst storm in six months since Storm Dennis on February 15th, was shown overnight in dramatic satellite imagery and maps.

The 900 mile wide storm lashed 15 feet of waves and flooded streets as staycationers faced the mayhem in the midst of the first named storm to hit the school summer break. Pictured: Staycationers from Co Tipperary on Tramore Beach, Ireland

Rain and poor visibility on the M25 motorway in Kent as Storm Ellen heads to the UK today promising a two-day deluge

Rain and poor visibility on the M25 motorway in Kent as Storm Ellen heads to the UK today promising a two-day deluge

People walking along Millennium Bridge in London under umbrellas experience wet weather in many parts of the UK ahead of the arrival of Storm Ellen

People walking along Millennium Bridge in London under umbrellas experience wet weather in many parts of the UK ahead of the arrival of Storm Ellen

A couple walk down to the water on Looe Beach, Cornwall, as the Met Office says we could see up to 50mm of rain over higher ground falling within six hours

A couple walk down to the water on Looe Beach, Cornwall, as the Met Office says we could see up to 50mm of rain over higher ground falling within six hours

Ellen, the UK's worst storm in six months since Storm Dennis on February 15th, was shown overnight in dramatic satellite imagery and maps

Ellen, Britain's worst storm in six months since Storm Dennis on February 15th, was shown overnight in dramatic satellite imagery and maps

Satellite imagery shows 75 miles per hour Storm Ellen amplifying into a 900 mile wide "weather bomb".

Satellite imagery shows 75 miles per hour Storm Ellen amplifying into a 900 mile wide "weather bomb".

The west will continue to see the strongest winds, but gusts of 40 miles per hour are also expected in parts of the east.

Surf more than 15 feet was seen on the Cornish coast and nearly 100 homes were blacked out by power outages in the area The environmental agency warned of flooding.

A four-day buffet with strong winds is due until Sunday, and after tomorrow the rain subsides.

Ellen, which contains the remains of Tropical Storm Kyle, is the first storm named by the Met Office or Ireland's Met Eireann during the school summer break since they started naming Atlantic storms in 2015.

Ellen is known by forecasters as a "weather bomb" because of her "explosive cyclogenesis", since her air pressure drops by more than 24 milibars within 24 hours.

The storm's air pressure dropped 34MB to 965MB in the 24 hours to midnight last night, Met Office forecasts showed.

Marco Petagna, Met Office forecaster, said: “Storm Ellen's very unusual conditions come with the tourist season in full swing and the trees in full leaf.

& # 39; The low pressure is deepening and warnings for winds above 100 km / h are given in some exposed areas.

& # 39; Thursday and Friday will be wet and windy, with more strong winds and heavy rainbands.

"And on some west coasts, large waves will develop that combine with high tide."

A Met Office forecaster said, "Summer will be long forgotten when the rain and wind set in. It will feel a lot more like autumn."

The Met Office said, "A" weather bomb "is not a perfect meteorological term, but is defined as an intense low pressure system with a central pressure that drops 24 millibars in 24 hours."

The Environment Agency said: “Local flooding is possible on Thursday evenings in the southwest from surface water and rivers, and on Thursday and Friday from large waves and floods in the southwest, Wales and the northeast.

"Land, roads, and some properties can be flooded and travel disruptions can occur."

Heavy rains will continue and a storm surge, spring tides and onshore winds can trigger flooding on the coast when Storm Ellen hits Britain this week

The Met Office issued a yellow wind warning on Wednesday and Thursday highlighting western parts of Wales, south-west Scotland and all of Northern Ireland

Heavy rains will continue and a storm surge, spring tides and onshore winds can trigger flooding on the coast when Storm Ellen hits Britain this week. The Met Office issued a yellow wind warning on Wednesday and Thursday highlighting western parts of Wales, south-west Scotland and all of Northern Ireland

The beach in Tramore, Ireland was closed due to extreme weather conditions as the storm swept over Ireland before dominating the UK for the rest of the week

The beach in Tramore, Ireland was closed due to the extreme weather conditions as the storm swept over Ireland before dominating the UK for the rest of the week

Millions of people who have taken breaks from home in the UK face demolished tents, power outages and travel disruptions as winds normally seen in winter roll through the area. Pictured: people hide from the rain on a row boat on the River Thames in Windsor, Berkshire

Millions of people who have taken breaks from home in the UK face demolished tents, power outages and travel disruptions as winds normally seen in winter roll through the area. Pictured: people hide from the rain on a row boat on the River Thames in Windsor, Berkshire

A dramatic rescue operation was launched this morning after a yacht was "pulled" from its anchor and dragged onto a West Country beach in the fury of Storm Ellen's howling winds of over 100 km / h

A dramatic rescue operation was launched this morning after a yacht was "pulled" from its anchor and dragged onto a West Country beach in the fury of Storm Ellen's howling winds of over 100 km / h

One person was on board and was safely rescued by Penlee Station and the Coast Guard after a joint operation with an RNLI lifeboat crew

One person was on board and was safely rescued by Penlee Station and the Coast Guard after a joint operation with an RNLI lifeboat crew

It comes after the Met Office warned that within six hours we could see up to 50mm of rain over higher ground.

Ellen has already devastated the UK and a dramatic rescue operation was launched this morning after a yacht was “pulled” from its anchor and the fury of the howling winds of the storm drove over 100 km / h to a West Country beach.

The Coast Guard said the yacht was blown ashore from its sea anchorage at Wherrytown near Penzance, Cornwall. One person was on board and was safely rescued by Penlee Station and the Coast Guard after a joint operation with an RNLI lifeboat crew.

Engineers struggled to restore supplies to properties near Falmouth, Par, Gunnislake and Porthleven.

When police warned the storm would turn roads into deadly runners, a driver was rescued when his car skid and overturned on the A38 in Plymouth, Devon this morning.

Another accident was reported on the B3285 in Goonhavern, Cornwall, and fallen trees blocked the roads in Liskeard and on the A380 Teignmouth Road in Devon.

The parking lot at the Tesco store in Truro has been turned into a lake by pouring rain.

A storm warning will go into effect tonight at 8:00 p.m. and will continue throughout Thursday. Gusts of up to 100 km / h are forecast inland and gusts of 100 km / h along the coast.

Huge waves crashed onto exposed beaches overlooking the Atlantic in north Devon and Cornwall, causing beachgoers and walkers to take cover while tourists were warned not to stand on boardwalks or rocks and take selfies in a storm – or they could ins Sea will be swept and drown.

The Met Office says there could be travel disruptions, debris on the roads and power outages if trees crash over overhead lines.

Heavy rains will hit and a storm surge, spring tides and onshore winds can trigger flooding on the coast.

The Met Office issued a yellow wind warning on Wednesday and Thursday classing western parts of Wales, south-west Scotland and all of Northern Ireland as threatened by high winds.

Flooding on the A35 near Dorchester, Dorset as Storm Ellen hits the south west of the UK today and slaughter is expected for the rest of the week

Flooding on the A35 near Dorchester, Dorset as Storm Ellen hits the south west of the UK today and slaughter is expected for the rest of the week

Heavy rains will hit and a storm surge, spring tides and onshore winds can trigger flooding on the coast. Flood on the A35 near Dorchester, Dorset

Heavy rains will hit and a storm surge, spring tides and onshore winds can trigger flooding on the coast. Flooding on the A35 near Dorchester, Dorset

Flooded roads become deadly skidpans, and drivers taking blind turns could find giant trees on the asphalt, police warned

Flooded roads become deadly skidpans, and drivers taking blind turns could find giant trees on the asphalt, police warned

People walk the Long Walk in Windsor Castle, Berkshire in the rain while Storm Ellen is pounding Britain today and will do so for the rest of the week

People walk the Long Walk in Windsor Castle, Berkshire in the rain as Storm Ellen is hammering Britain today and will do so for the rest of the week

A yellow weather alert, stretching from Cornwall to south west Scotland, is in effect Wednesday 8pm to midnight and predicts strong winds that could disrupt travel and electricity supplies on Thursday.

The stormy conditions mark a dramatic turn from the UK's extreme heat wave to last week, which recorded temperatures of at least 34 ° C (93 ° F) for the first time in six consecutive days.

Barnstaple, Devon, residents are still mopping up after the pouring rain flooded shops and homes earlier this week.

Now they face further soaking as the latest storm tears its way through Ireland and hits the UK today.

Some regions can expect rain all day – in the middle of the main summer holiday season.

Most of the UK can expect strong winds and rain in the coming days, the Met Office warned.

Nearly 100 homes were blacked out by power outages in Cornwall when Storm Ellen walked in. The picture shows a rain-soaked man walking through Looe, Cornwall

Nearly 100 homes were blacked out by power outages in Cornwall when Storm Ellen walked in. The picture shows a rain-soaked man walking through Looe, Cornwall

A yellow weather alert, stretching from Cornwall to the south-west of Scotland, is in place on Wednesday from 8 p.m. to midnight and predicts strong winds that could cause disruption

A yellow weather alert, stretching from Cornwall to the south-west of Scotland, is in place on Wednesday from 8 p.m. to midnight and predicts strong winds that could cause disruption

Steve Ramsdale, Chief Meteorologist for the Office said: “After the recent hot and thundering weather, we are seeing a significant change in very unexplained conditions in August with an unusual bout of high winds associated with low pressure centers in the second half of the week.

& # 39; The uncertainty in the intensity of these systems remains high at this point, but we are confident that a period of much windier weather will change.

"Tropical air associated with a decayed tropical cyclone is drawn into Britain, and the stark contrast between that warm and humid air and normal North Atlantic air masses can make for a very powerful system."

He described it as a "very strong" weather system created by the warm and humid air of a decayed tropical cyclone with normal North Atlantic air masses.

Temperatures are much lower than they have been for the past 10 days when many places were over 86 ° F of heat.

Parts of East Anglia still saw highs of around 82 ° F on Thursday.

Deputy Chief Meteorologist Matthew Lehnert said: “In addition to the sometimes heavy rain, strong winds can have effects that are not common in August.

Dark threatening rain clouds only miss the seaside resort of Lyme Regis in Dorset, where sunbathers and vacationers watch yesterday

Dark threatening rain clouds only miss the seaside resort of Lyme Regis in Dorset, where sunbathers and vacationers watch yesterday

Ominous clouds overlook the final day of the Leicestershire v Durham cricket match in Leicester yesterday

Ominous clouds overlook the final day of the Leicestershire v Durham cricket match in Leicester yesterday

"Given this unexplained weather, which coincides with trees in full foliage and a peak in the camping season, wind-related impacts are more likely at lower wind speeds than at other times of the year, particularly in Northern Ireland, where winds are predicted to be strongest."

Rod Dennis, spokesman for RAC Breakdown, said, “This time of autumn weather will make driving conditions very uncomfortable for many of us for the next few days.

“Strong winds mean that road trips take longer than usual and can be affected by fallen branches on the road. Add in some very intense rains and drivers must be very careful to complete their drives safely.

“We encourage every driver to be on their way to make sure their car is up to the task, to avoid disruption from wind and rain, especially when towing or taking a long drive. In particular, check the condition and pressure of all broken tires beforehand.

"Slow down as you drive and watch out for high-sided vehicles and other drivers with caravans and trailers so you have enough time to react if you run into trouble."

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