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SPORTAGENDA: Manchester United rewards employees and key employees with beer and cider


Manchester United's response to the coronavirus pandemic has been rightly praised – and now employees will have a glass.

The club, which encouraged its workers to help in their communities, asked the 170 who did so to give a box of beer or cider to a key worker they knew – and to keep one for themselves.

The alcohol comes from the 7,000 bottles of lager and cider that have remained in Old Trafford's stocks since football stopped in mid-March.

Manchester United has asked community workers to give a key crate of beer or cider to the key workers they know and keep one for themselves to reward their hard work

United has asked 3,000 older and disabled subscribers for social assistance, provided 60,000 meals for local NHS workers, and delivered 30,000 items to food banks.

In return for the drink, employees were asked to hand in used children's books in order to include them in the activity packages sent out by the United & # 39; s Foundation.

United has asked 3,000 older and disabled subscribers for social assistance, provided 60,000 meals for local NHS workers, and delivered 30,000 items to food banks.

In return for the drink, employees were asked to hand in used children's books to include in the activity packages sent out by the United & # 39; s Foundation.

Golf clubs affected by changes to the blocking rules

Some have claimed that the Prime Minister's announcement on Thursday evening to further relax the lockdown rules may have been a diversion tactic after Dominic Cumming's controversial trip to Durham caused a stir.

It certainly seems to have caught the nation's golf clubs on the go. A number of golf courses have informed the Sports Agenda that the England Golf governing body has contacted the government to clarify in writing that groups of four, rather than a maximum of two, may tee off starting Monday.

Sources say the Prime Minister's announcement was "completely unexpected" and that the Gulf Bodies expected changes at the earliest this week.

Some golf clubs were affected by the Prime Minister's further relaxation of the blocking rules

Some golf clubs were affected by the Prime Minister's further relaxation of the blocking rules

They add that a similar scenario happened when golf returned for the first time.

The move caused a mess at clubs across the country that was already struggling with increasing demand to ensure that their courses and booking systems were up and running in time.

Tennis players in Wales enjoyed the government's stance

The Welsh government's refusal to allow recreational tennis to resume for another three weeks leads to confusion and anger among players.

Wales is now the only area in Western Europe where, despite strict social distancing measures, sport is considered too dangerous to play outdoors.

This is particularly serious for the region's 200 touring coaches, whose livelihood depends on resumption.

Tennis Wales tightened its initially flimsy protests over the weekend, and a petition was launched. Managing Director Simon Johnson wrote to the First Minister, and there is hope that the authorities will rethink this.

Ironically, the man who effectively invented modern lawn tennis was Major Walter Clopton Wingfield, a Welsh man from Denbighshire.

Sky's claims about free-to-air games are incorrect

In a press release on "Aren't we brilliant?" Last week, generous Sky, which is currently in talks about a discount with Premier League clubs, announced it would show 25 games "free to air" when football returned.

The message was supplemented by a quote from Stephen van Rooyen, the managing director, who said the move was "for the first time in Sky Sports history".

"Really?" Insiders quickly pointed out that in 2013, in its escalating battle against BT Sport, Sky decided to show its first game of the season – Manchester United's trip to Swansea – for free.

Sky Sports' claims about free-to-air games are false because they have previously shown free games

Sky Sports' claims about free-to-air games are false because they have previously shown free games

Premier League strives to ensure that VAR is used

The Premier League chiefs and referee are still considering ways to ensure that VAR comes back when football returns.

Concerns about social distance at Stockley Park have been raised, and discussions have been held about moving teams to stadium parking lots and placing them in separate rooms.

Premier League insiders are confident that a solution will be found – which is a shame – but if it doesn't come in time, VAR won't be rolled out later this season.

The Premier League's stance on media access is also discussed further. Club media employees are unlikely to be approved in bulk. A press officer is expected to monitor the press conferences. In addition, the number of journalists is reduced, with only 10 being allowed from the written press for each game.

The Premier League wants to ensure that VAR can be used when the top action returns

The Premier League wants to ensure that VAR can be used when the top action returns

The BBC's chief sports journalist continues

The BBC's main sports journalist, Tom Fordyce, has left the building.

In a step that was confirmed by the broadcaster to the sports agenda and then announced to the employees, Fordyce is on the way to new pastures.

Speculation that the writer's departure – perhaps best known for his work on the popular podcast That Peter Crouch – is related to that of Radio 5 Live Sports editor Mike Carr has been widespread. In a brief email, Ben Gallop, director of radio and digital, said Carr would go to "pursue an opportunity outside the BBC" – presumably with podcasts. Fordyce is now expected to follow a similar path.

Sky Sports no longer pays guests with a Sunday surcharge

Sky Sports no longer pays guests who appear on the Sunday supplement. The broadcaster, who used employee Geoff Shreeves to replace the freelancer Jacqui Oatley for the presentation of the show, appears to be on a cost-cutting offensive.

They were thrilled by the lack of money by Jeremy Cross, chief sports journalist for Daily Star, on Sunday.

Cross had to intervene to present the show when Shreeves' internet connection failed.

"It was about five minutes, but it felt like five hours," the star man joked, adding, "I'm going to stand up for Emily Maitlis in the Newsnight this week."

Sky Sports' Sunday supplement, currently moderated by Geoff Shreeves (photo), appears to be on a cost-cutting course

Sky Sports' Sunday supplement, currently moderated by Geoff Shreeves (photo), appears to be on a cost-cutting course

The Australian National Rugby League is growing in popularity in the UK

If anything is overlooked by the frequent references to the British crowd – and Dominic Cummings' cardboard clipping in the crowd – Australia's newly launched National Rugby League is enjoying growing popularity here.

The games shown on Sky Sports offer priced audience noise that has been surprisingly realistic. During the exciting draw between Penrith and Newcastle on Sunday, commentator Andrew Voss quipped: "The crowd is on the edge of their seats – they cannot move."

The game between Penrith and Newcastle in the Australian National Rugby League had increased the noise of the audience

The game between Penrith and Newcastle in the Australian National Rugby League had increased the noise of the audience

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Sport (t) Football (t) Coronavirus (t) Manchester United