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Spain could experience a second wave of coronavirus, health chiefs say


One of the leading Spanish health authorities has warned that the country could be suffering from a second wave of coronaviruses as the number of cases has increased alarmingly and triggered numerous local closures.

Deputy director of emergency health, Maria Jose Sierra, expressed concern about the increase in Covid 19 cases after the country recorded another 2,615 new infections yesterday – a doubling from 1,357 the previous day.

Ms. Sierra said: “We have important breakouts. It could be a second wave. We have to see what happens in the next few weeks. & # 39;

France has not ruled out that its borders with Spain will be closed, and Norway threatens to put it on the red list of countries in which returning visitors have to be quarantined for ten days.

British tourists have also been warned that a new travel system could cause airlifts to collapse briefly and be quarantined when they return to the UK.

The Spanish tourism industry, which accounts for around 12 percent of the country's economy, is now facing uncertainty after the country's borders were reopened to tourists with enthusiasm last month.

This graphic shows the new Spanish coronavirus cases in the past two weeks. A further 2,615 new infections were recorded yesterday – compared to 1,357 the previous day. The large increase of 4,000 cases is due to the fact that the country has stopped reporting cases on weekends

This graph of the overall coronavirus outbreak shows that cases are increasing rapidly, but are still lagging behind the 9,000 a day at the peak of the outbreak

This graph of the overall coronavirus outbreak shows that cases are increasing rapidly, but are still lagging behind the 9,000 a day at the peak of the outbreak

This graph of the total coronavirus outbreak shows the number of coronavirus deaths per day in Spain and shows that the number of deaths has not yet increased with the increase in cases

This graph of the total coronavirus outbreak shows the number of coronavirus deaths per day in Spain and shows that the number of deaths has not yet increased with the increase in cases

Spain has not exceeded four coronavirus deaths per day in the past two weeks

Spain has not exceeded four coronavirus deaths per day in the past two weeks

People sitting on beach towels in Cala de Alfacar, Menorca earlier this week for fear of a second wave of coronavirus cases in Spain

People sitting on beach towels in Cala de Alfacar, Menorca earlier this week for fear of a second wave of coronavirus cases in Spain

The British airlift to Spain could be dropped without notice

British tourists have been warned that a new travel system could cause airlifts to collapse briefly and be quarantined when they return to the UK.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office earlier this month made exemptions for a number of countries from its "far from essential" travel guidelines.

This means that vacationers can currently travel to 74 locations without having to quarantine for 14 days after returning to the UK.

However, the UK is currently reviewing every country on the "safe list" every three weeks. However, the government is expected to submit a new ongoing checklist, which means that locations could be on a “red list” very quickly, as The Telegraph reports.

This means that you could go abroad for your vacation to a country on the "safe" list, but while an increase in coronavirus cases might be gone, the government could put this on the "red" list, meaning that You would have to be quarantined for 14 years. Days after your return.

It is the first time that a senior Spanish health official has used the phrase "second wave" since an increase in the number of Covid 19 cases after the country's state of emergency ended on June 21.

And Spanish epidemiologist Juan Jose Badiola said he couldn't rule out a national return to a draconian state of emergency when people were told to stay inside unless they wanted to buy food or go to the chemist.

He told Spanish television operator Telecinco today, "I would like to believe that we do not need to go back to this, but I cannot completely rule it out as the rate of new infections becomes very worrying."

However, other Spanish health authorities are more confident that the surge will decrease in the cases.

Tourism Minister Maria Reyes Maroto tried to assess an increasingly worrying situation by insisting that the health situation in Catalonia and Aragon, the two worst affected areas in the country, "get better".

Catalan Health Minister Josep Maria Argimon admitted that his health care system was facing "critical days".

He added: “We are not in critical days like March when our intensive care units in the hospital were full. It is crucial that people follow all the rules and guidelines to ensure that the spread of the virus slows down. & # 39;

France has said it would not rule out closing its border with the Catalan region of Spain as it sees a "significant increase" in infections, according to the French health authority.

Catalonia, which borders France, has been at the heart of a recovery in coronavirus cases since Spain lifted a nationwide block a month ago.

Almost 7,000 cases have been recorded there in the past 14 days, which is almost half of the country's total, although the rate has decreased in the past few days.

Norway has also warned that Spain could be included in its list of high-risk countries, which would mean that all newcomers would be forced into quarantine for ten days.

The Totana region in Murcia in southeastern Spain was last hit by a new blockage on Thursday after an outbreak in a pub called Dubai.

More than 50 people in the nightclub tested positive for the virus.

Around 30,000 residents are affected by the Totana closure. Entry and exit to the community is prohibited, except in cases of extreme necessity.

Restaurants and bars are only allowed to open outside terraces with a capacity of 50 percent.

Restrictions on night bars and discos have been introduced in several Spanish cities and regions before the critical weekend is considered critical for Spain's attempts to turn the tide against a second wave of cases.

Any nationwide return to blockage would prove another blow to the Spanish economy after two-thirds of tourists canceled their hotel bookings this month.

Cancellation rates are 77 percent for families and 70 percent in the Balearic Islands, to which Mallorca belongs.

In some hotels, the number of tourists canceling a vacation booked a few weeks or months ago is higher than the number of new bookings.

Elizabeth Keegan, Tourism Director in Lloret de Mar, said: “We are receiving cancellations from the UK, France and Belgium.

"The 120 hotels here are 65 percent full and usually 100 percent this time of year."

Spain has registered more than 9,000 new cases in the past seven days, after only 5,000 had occurred the previous week.

People wearing face masks are walking along La Misericordia beach in Malaga earlier this week as Spain is facing a new blow to its tourism industry due to the corona virus

People wearing face masks are walking along La Misericordia beach in Malaga earlier this week as Spain is facing a new blow to its tourism industry due to the corona virus

People sunbathing on La Misericordia beach in Malaga this week as the Spanish tourism industry faces uncertainty

People sunbathing on La Misericordia beach in Malaga this week as the Spanish tourism industry faces uncertainty

According to studies by the tourism group Dingus, visitors who booked their trips two to four months ago canceled more than 80 percent of their vacation.

The UK government has not made any changes to its rules related to Spain after it abolished the 14-day quarantine rule for people returning to England from Spain after July 10th.

But it comes after British tourists have been warned that a new travel system could cause airlifts to collapse briefly and be quarantined when they return to the UK.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office earlier this month made exemptions for a number of countries from its "far from essential" travel guidelines.

This means that vacationers can currently travel to 74 locations without having to quarantine for 14 days after returning to the UK.

However, the UK is currently reviewing every country on the "safe list" every three weeks. However, the government is expected to submit a new ongoing checklist, which means that locations could be on a “red list” very quickly, as The Telegraph reports.

This means that you could go abroad for your vacation to a country on the "safe" list, but while an increase in coronavirus cases might be gone, the government could put it on the "red" list, meaning that You would have to be quarantined for 14 years. Days after your return.

There is also discussion that "regional" airlifts could be set up to allow people to travel to certain areas of countries where fewer coronavirus infections occur.

The government of the Balearic Islands insists that the archipelago is "safe for residents and visitors", but some tourists are alarmed by the growing number of cases.

The “regional” airlift plan could identify areas of low risk in high-risk countries that travelers could visit without being subject to the 14-day quarantine rules when they return.

Such a move would end the complete ban on travel for entire countries and further relax the quarantine rules.

It is believed that the Airlift Plan will be reviewed as part of a review of current travel restrictions. Changes will be announced on Monday by Secretary of Transportation Grant Shapps.

Women with facial masks are walking along the beach at La Misericordia in Malaga earlier this week in the coronavirus crisis

Women with facial masks are walking along the beach at La Misericordia in Malaga earlier this week in the coronavirus crisis

The introduction of "regional" airlifts could enable trips to tourist hotspots such as the Algarve and Madeira in Portugal, while at the same time prohibiting entry into areas such as Lisbon, where the corona virus is more common.

It could also allow some trips to the United States to return, fearing that the national scale of its outbreak could result in a long-term ban.

A source told The Telegraph: “Regional airlifts are an option for countries with localized outbreaks.

& # 39; The US is a big problem. If you judge it nationally, the absence of travel could go on for months, where individual tests of arrivals could work. & # 39;

Gloria Guevara, President of the World Travel and Tourism Council, told The Times: “Establishing air corridors between financial centers where infection rates are low, such as between London and New York, would greatly promote business travel and the US will support economic recovery. & # 39;

In the meantime, ministers are also expected to consider introducing coronavirus testing before or upon arrival at UK airports as another measure that could reopen the trip to the United States.

Mr. Shapps will announce any changes to the current travel rules on Monday and will announce whether or not countries will be added to the 74 countries that are already exempt from the 14-day quarantine requirement.