ENTERTAINMENT

Sleep quality decreased during the COVID-19 lock


The coronavirus lock has allowed people to have a regular sleep schedule with more time in bed than normal.

75 percent of those questioned said they slept up to 15 minutes longer on average than before the closure.

While the amount of sleep has increased, the quality has dropped significantly, according to scientists.

This is believed to be due to the fact that, due to the COVID 19 pandemic, a "self-perceived burden" has strained people's minds.

Coronavirus blocking has allowed people to have a regular sleep schedule with more hours in bed than normal. 75 percent of respondents said they slept up to 15 minutes longer on average than before the closure (inventory)

Between March 23 and April 26, 2020, researchers from the University of Basel asked 435 people how the blockade affected their sleep cycles.

The study, published in Current Biology, says that switching to a remote lifestyle and staying at home for longer has led to more sleep.

A major reason, researchers say, is the lack of "social jet lag".

Social jet lag is a term used to describe the fatigue and exhaustion caused by burning the candle at both ends and sacrificing sleep to spend time with friends and family.

Under normal conditions, like before the pandemic, people usually sleep a lot more on weekends than during the work week.

However, the ban has eliminated social jet lag, so sleep cycles have become more even over the course of seven days.

According to scientists, while the amount of sleep has increased, sleep quality has dropped significantly. This is believed to be due to the fact that, due to the COVID 19 pandemic, a "self-perceived burden" has strained people's minds.

According to scientists, while the amount of sleep has increased, sleep quality has dropped significantly. This is believed to be due to the fact that, due to the COVID 19 pandemic (stocks), a "self-perceived burden" has put a strain on people's minds.

Adolescents who get more sleep are more resilient and better able to deal with stress

Young people who get more sleep at night are better able to deal with changes and stress, as new studies have shown.

Adolescents were asked about their sleeping habits and how long it takes them to get off in the evening, while answering questions about their resilience.

The study found that adolescents with the best sleep patterns are also the most resistant.

Data from 840 students were collected via questionnaires within 24 months.

Chinese researchers who conducted the study found higher resilience values ​​among teenagers who had repeatedly slept well.

It was also a good sign of a high level of resilience, to be able to fall asleep quickly and not to throw around in bed for long and turn around.

"Typically, we would expect a decrease in social jet lag to be associated with reports of improved sleep quality," said cognitive neuroscientist Christine Blume, who led the research.

In our sample, however, overall sleep quality decreased.

"We believe that the self-perceived burden that has increased significantly during this unprecedented COVID-19 lockout could have outweighed the otherwise beneficial effects of reduced social jetlag."

In a separate study at the University of Colorado, researchers asked 139 students similar questions.

They found that the nightly sleep duration increased by around 30 minutes on weekdays and by 24 minutes on weekends after their classes were moved online and they did not have to attend in person.

The timing of sleep also became more regular every day and there was less social jet lag.

Professor Kenneth Wright, who led this study, says insufficient sleep, irregular sleep patterns, and social jet lag are common in modern society.

& # 39; Poor sleep behavior contributes to and worsens major health and safety issues, including heart disease and stroke, weight gain and obesity, diabetes, mood disorders such as depression and anxiety, substance abuse and compromised immune health, and morning sleepiness. cognitive impairments, reduced work productivity, poor school performance and the risk of accidents / sleepy traffic accidents. "

He added: “It is not surprising that this unprecedented situation of the pandemic and the blockade increased self-perceived stress and impaired sleep quality.

On a positive note, however, the loosening of social schedules has also led to better coordination between external or social factors that determine our sleep-wake timing and our body's internal biological signals.

"This was associated with more sleep overall."

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