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Shocking moment man driving electric scooter jumping red light at busy intersection


Shocking moment Man driving electric scooter jumps red light at busy intersection before weaving through oncoming traffic

  • An instructor shared dashcam footage of the ruthless man on a scooter
  • People reacted to the video with anger over how dangerous the move was
  • In the UK, it has been legal to use electric scooters on the road since July 4th

A man barely avoids oncoming traffic when jumping a red light on an electric scooter and crossing a busy intersection.

An instructor shared the video of the reckless move on London Road in Mitcham, Merton, London.

The clip begins with the man on the sidewalk heading for the learning car that has stopped at a traffic light.

As soon as he has passed the learner driver, he turns into the street and shockingly makes an illegal right turn without stopping, moving at speed between the traffic flows.

The man then steps onto the sidewalk and disappears from view as he walks towards the city center.

The man on the electric scooter does not stop at the red light and continues into the oncoming traffic

As soon as the man is on the other side of the street, he has to avoid oncoming cars by driving between them

As soon as the man is on the other side of the street, he has to avoid oncoming cars by driving between them

Nurudeen Ali shared the footage online: "The electric scooters are hard to see and hard to hear."

Terence Dite commented: "Another uncontrollable danger for drivers to convince everyone to stop using their vehicles."

Kate Le Conte wrote: "Electric scooters are good but why do the people who drive them have no rules, seems a bit beefy as they are dangerous."

Dwight Sanders said, "That was sick, good balls on this guy."

Tim James added, "Nawww, I thought he was going to be hit … damn it."

Since July 4th, it has been legal in the UK to use electric scooters on the road, bike lanes and bike lanes – but only if they are insured under a rental program and limited to 15 mph.

Thanks to new laws, companies and local authorities have been able to start a 12-month trial version in which street-legal electric scooters are available for rent.

Finally he crosses the busy street and disappears down a side street towards the city center

Finally he crosses the busy street and disappears down a side street towards the city center

To rent an electric scooter, you must be at least 16 years old and have a valid provisional driver's license. Wearing a helmet is not mandatory, but it is recommended.

If you have your own electric scooter, it is illegal to use it anywhere on private land with the landowner's permission.

Those who break the rules risk a fixed fine of £ 300 and 6 points on their license (if any).

Last year, TV presenter Emily Hartridge was driving her electric scooter on a busy roundabout when she was hit by a truck and killed.

The former Channel 4 presenter, 35, was the first person to be killed in an e-scooter accident in the UK, leaving her broken family and boyfriend behind.

Her boyfriend, who gave her the scooter, later announced that she was on her way to a fertility clinic scan on the day she died.

YouTube star Emily Hartridge was on her way for a fertility clinic scan last July when she was killed in an accident on her e-scooter. The presenter is shown showing her joy when the scooter is presented to her

YouTube star Emily Hartridge was on her way to a fertility clinic scan last July when she was killed in an accident on her e-scooter. The presenter is shown showing her joy when the scooter is presented to her

What is the current UK e-scooter law?

According to the Ministry of Transport, e-scooters are classified as “powered vans” and meet the legal definition of a “motor vehicle”.

They must therefore meet a number of requirements in order to be used on the road, including insurance and “technical standards” compliance.

Since this is not the case, its use on UK roads is considered illegal.

City Police have also stated that it is illegal to use e-scooters on the street and that there is a risk of drivers being fined or even having penalty points on their driver's license.

Drivers also risk having their e-scooters confiscated by the police.

The Department of Transportation said e-scooters are covered by the 1988 Road Traffic Act, which also includes segways, hoverboards, go-peds (internal combustion engine kick scooters), powered unicycles, and sub-bikes.

The ban does not apply to electrically assisted pedal bicycles.

According to the Ministry of Transport: “In order for motor vehicles to legally use public roads, they must meet a number of different requirements. This includes insurance; Compliance with technical standards and usage standards; Road tax payment, licensing and registration; Driver tests and licenses; and the use of relevant safety equipment.

“If the user of a powered van could meet these requirements, it could in principle be lawful to use public roads. However, it is likely that it will be very difficult for them to meet all of these requirements, which means that it would be a criminal offense to use them on the street. "

E-scooters are not allowed to use sidewalks under the Highway Act of 1835. E-scooters can be used on private land with the permission of the landowner.

However, from Saturday you can use them – under certain conditions.

A legal framework for legal proceedings is intended to confirm that vehicles are limited to 24 km / h and are only allowed on roads, bike paths and paths, but not on sidewalks.

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