ENTERTAINMENT

Shamima Begum's LAWYER admits that there is "always a possibility" that it could pose a threat to the UK


Shamima Begum's own attorney admitted today that "there is always a possibility" that the jihad bride poses a terrorist threat to the country she fled to Syria – but believes she should still return to the UK, to fight for their passport.

Tasnime Akunjee spoke out after the Supreme Court heard that the 21-year-old who fled was allowed to join IS when he was 15. Appealing against the decision to withdraw her British citizenship would be an "affront to justice".

Mr Akunjee told Good Morning Britain: "There is always a possibility (it is a threat) – but if you compare your situation to the brother of the Ariana Grande concert bomber, Mr Abedi, the UK government has put a lot of time and effort into to secure him in Libya and extradited to Great Britain to be tried on 22 murders. He will spend the next 55 years in prison.

Then he was asked by Susanna Reid if Begum should return to Britain, even if she posed a threat. He said: "The Court of Appeals has made it clear that if she returns to the UK, the Home Office will impose additional restrictions on her to mitigate potential threats."

The 21-year-old's case is under review by the Supreme Court after her British citizenship was revoked by then Home Secretary Savid Javid.

A decision will be made as to whether Begum, who is currently in the Al Hawl refugee camp in Syria, will be allowed to return to the UK to appeal his citizenship. Britain believes it is not stateless because people with Bangladeshi parents are granted citizenship of the South Asian country at birth.

British Jihadi woman Shamima Begum with her son Jerah (now deceased) in Al Hawl, Syria. She wants to return to the UK, where she has torn her citizenship

What happened to Begum's two school friends who ran with her to Syria?

Amira Abase

The British schoolgirl, who traveled to Syria with two teenage friends to join the Islamic State, was reportedly killed in an air strike.

Amira Abase's mother, who was only 15 when she fled her London home to join ISIS in 2015, has told friends that she understands that her daughter died almost a year ago.

Not only did Fetia Hussen learn from informed sources that her daughter was believed to have been killed, but she also lost the mobile app communication she had with Amira last summer.

Friends of Fetia Hussen say she believes her daughter, who married Abdullah Elmir, an 18-year-old Australian jihad, died but holds on to faint hope that she is wrong. Both Fetia Hussen and Amira's father Abase Hussen declined to comment.

Some have claimed she faked her death to escape Syria.

Kadiza Sultana

17-year-old Kadiza Sultana is said to have died in 2016 after her home in the Raqqa stronghold of the terrorist state was hit by a bomb that was believed to have been dropped from a Russian plane.

The teenager quickly became disaffected with Isis and told her family last summer that she wanted to return home.

ITV News revealed that Kadiza, one of three Bethnal Green schoolgirls who left their homes to join what is known as Islamic State, is dead.

Her sister Halima Khanom said, “We kind of expected that. But at least we know she's in a better place. & # 39;

Yesterday the hearing was told that it posed a "clear and serious threat" to national security.

Government attorney Sir James Eadie QC said: “There is no basis on which to conclude that the risks it poses can be satisfactorily managed

& # 39; National security is at serious risk. Allowing the substantive appeal would not constitute an application of justice but an affront to justice. "

She was one of three Bethnal Green Academy students who left their homes and families in December 2014 to join the extremists.

She lived under IS rule for more than three years before she was found nine months pregnant in a Syrian refugee camp in February of last year.

At the start of yesterday's hearing, government attorney Sir Eadie QC spoke on what could happen if ISIS members return to the UK, using an MI5 threat assessment report.

He said, “The fact is that the threat is real and serious, despite the age of the individual when he traveled.

“The assessment is that those who have traveled to align and align pose a clear and serious threat, especially on return.

"Exposure of the public to an increased risk of terrorism in this case is not justified or appropriate for reasons of fairness."

He then referred to Begum's interview with a newspaper in 2019 and how she said she did not regret going to Syria.

Sir Eadie added: “Serious concerns about the threat of return underpin the disengagement.

“In particular, the aim of this measure is to make it very difficult for them to return because in that case they represent the kind of risks that you saw

"It is the responsibility of the state to protect its citizens from the threat of terrorism as much as possible."

"She married an IS fighter, lived in Raqqa – the capital of the self-proclaimed caliphate – and stayed with them for about four years, until in 2019 she practically left the last pocket of the IS territory in Baghuz."

In writing, Sir James said: “This case raises questions about the balance between the level of protection of procedural rights and the level of protection of the public from terrorism.

“Can it be right that a person who has become involved in terrorism and is now overseas and subject to restrictions that affect their ability to participate in domestic proceedings can rely on these self-created barriers to return? to insist in the jurisdiction? so that they can now participate in such proceedings?

"Can it be right that they should be able to do so when doing so directly runs counter to the most effective protection of the public from the risks of harm caused by terrorism?"

Begum (seen on the right) was one of three Bethnal Green Academy school girls who traveled to Syria

Begum (seen on the right) was one of three Bethnal Green Academy school girls who traveled to Syria

Begum was one of three girls from the Bethnal Green Academy who joined ISIS in 2014

Begum was one of three girls from the Bethnal Green Academy who joined ISIS in 2014

Three more jihadists want to return to the UK

Three other British-Bangladeshi citizens who are believed to have traveled to Syria to join IS are calling for their British citizenship to be revoked.

Two UK-born women, known only as C3 and C4, argue that the decision to revoke their UK citizenship on national security grounds made them stateless and therefore illegal.

C3 is with her children in the al-Roj camp in Syria – where Ms. Begum is currently imprisoned – while C4 and her children are being held in the "notorious" al-Hawl camp, where the conditions of the International Committee of the Red Cross as "apocalyptic".

Her British citizenship was removed in November 2019, but her lawyers claim they were not informed of the decision until six weeks later when the Foreign Office told their families that they would not provide "consular assistance" as they were no longer British citizens be.

C7, who was born in Bangladesh but became a British citizen when he was born, is also believed to have traveled to Syria to join IS.

In March he was informed that the Home Office would remove his British citizenship on the basis that he had joined ISIS and posed a threat to UK national security.

All three are appealing this week against the decision to revoke their British citizenship to the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) – a specialized court that hears appeals against decisions to remove British citizenship on national security grounds.

At the start of a five-day preliminary hearing on Monday, Dan Squires QC for C3 and C4 informed the tribunal that none of his clients were Bangladeshi citizens at the time of their UK citizenship revocation and that they were therefore rendered stateless by the decision.

He added that C3 was not a Bangladeshi citizen at the time of the withdrawal decision, even if C3 was a Bangladeshi citizen at birth, as she would have lost her citizenship when she would have turned 21 under Bangladeshi law.

Mr Squires said that C4 was born a Bangladeshi national "by descent" to her father, but that she also lost that citizenship when she turned 21.

He said they are currently being held in "appalling conditions" and "in need of British assistance which is currently denied because they are no longer citizens".

Begum was one of three Bethnal Green Academy students who came to ISIS shortly after Sharmeena Begum, who is not a relative, traveled to Syria in December 2014.

Kadiza Sultana and Amira Abase, then 16 and 15 respectively, flew from London to Istanbul with Begum before heading to Syria.

Mr Javid revoked her British citizenship on national security grounds after she was found in the camp.

However, in July the Court of Appeals ruled that "the only way to get a fair and effective appeal is to come to the UK to pursue your appeal".

Lord Justice Flaux, who sat with Lady Justice King and Lord Justice Singh, said any decision must be weighed carefully

They added: "Fairness and equity must outweigh national security concerns in this case in order for permission to appeal to be granted."

Later that month, the Court of Appeals gave both the Home Office and Ms. Begum permission to bring her case to the UK Supreme Court.

It also ordered a "stay" with Ms. Begum's return "pending further order by the Supreme Court".

At a two-day hearing that began this morning, the Supreme Court will examine whether Ms. Begum can return to the UK to appeal the disfranchised British citizenship.

Five Supreme Court justices, led by the President of the Court, Lord Reed, will also consider whether Ms. Begum's appeal should be upheld if she is denied entry to the UK.

Also yesterday, the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) will hear the cases of three people of British-Bangladeshi heritage whose British citizenship has been revoked on national security grounds.

SIAC – a specialized court that hears appeals to decisions to remove British citizenship on national security grounds – will hear appeals from two women known only as C3 and C4, who have also allegedly traveled to Syria from the UK to join IS .

At the same time, the tribunal will hear an appeal from a man referred to only as C7, whose British citizenship was revoked earlier this year after he too allegedly traveled to Syria to join ISIS.

All three claim the decision to remove their UK citizenship made them stateless and therefore illegal, which the Home Office has denied.

In Ms Begum's case, SIAC initially ruled that she “cannot play a significant role in her appeal and that the appeal will not be fair and effective in that regard” but said “it does not mean that her appeal will be successful”.

However, earlier this year the appeals court said, "It is difficult to imagine a case where a court has declared that we cannot have a fair trial, but we will move on anyway."

Ms. Begum was one of three Bethnal Green Academy students who left their homes and families to join IS shortly after Sharmeena Begum, who is not a relative, traveled to Syria in December 2014.

The girls flew from Gatwick to Istanbul and were then assisted by ISIS traders through Turkey to Syria

The girls flew from Gatwick to Istanbul and were then assisted by ISIS traders through Turkey to Syria

Kadiza Sultana and Amira Abase, then 16 and 15 years old respectively, and Ms. Begum boarded a flight from Gatwick Airport to Istanbul, Turkey, on February 17, 2015, before making their way to Raqqa in Syria.

Ms. Begum claims that she married the Dutch convert Yago Riedijk 10 days after arriving on IS territory. All three of her school friends are reported to have married foreign IS fighters as well.

She told The Times last February that she left Raqqa with her husband in January 2017, but their children, a one-year-old girl and a three-month-old boy, have both died since then.

Their third child died shortly after he was born.

The case continues.

Timeline: How Shamima Begum's dream of becoming a Jihad Bride resulted in her being stripped of her British citizenship for joining ISIS

Escape to Syria: Kadiza Sultana (16), Shamima Begum (then 15) and 15-year-old Amira Abase, before they joined IS in Syria. Begum's friends are said to be dead

Escape to Syria: Kadiza Sultana (16), Shamima Begum (then 15) and 15-year-old Amira Abase, before they joined IS in Syria. Begum's friends are said to be dead

Here is a timeline of the events following the disappearance of the three girls that led to Shamima Begum's legal action.

2015

– February 17th – Kadiza Sultana, Amira Abase and Shamima Begum leave their homes in east London at 8 a.m. to travel from Gatwick Airport to Istanbul, Turkey. Begum and Abase are reported missing by their families later that day.

– February 18 – Sultana is reported missing to the police.

– 20. February – The city police are publicly calling for information on the missing girls who are feared to have traveled on to Syria. The Met raises concerns that the missing girls may have fled to join ISIS.

– 21st of February – Four days after the girls disappeared, police believe they may still be in Turkey.

– February 22nd – Abase's father Abase Hussen says his daughter told him she was going to a wedding on the day she disappeared.

– March 10th – It turns out that the girls financed their trip by stealing jewelry.

2016

– August 2016 – The then 17-year-old Sultana is said to have been killed in Raqqa in May when an alleged Russian air strike wiped out her home.

2019

– 13th February Begum, then 19, tells The Times' Anthony Loyd that she wants to return to the UK to give birth to her third child.

Begum, speaking from the al-Hawl refugee camp in northern Syria, tells the newspaper, “I'm not the same stupid little 15-year-old schoolgirl who ran away from Bethnal Green four years ago. And I don't regret coming here. & # 39;

– – February 15th – Interior Minister Sajid Javid says he will not hesitate to prevent the return of British people who have come to join ISIS.

– February 17th – Begum gives birth to her third child in al-Hawl – a little boy, Jarrah. Her two other children, a daughter named Sarayah and a son named Jerah, both died earlier.

– 19th of February – The Home Office sends Begum's family a letter stating that they intend to revoke their British citizenship.

– 20. February – Begum, who was shown a copy of the Home Office letter by ITV News, describes the decision as "unjust".

– February 22nd – Begum's family writes to Mr Javid asking for help in bringing their newborn son to the UK. Shamima's sister Renu Begum wrote on behalf of the family that the boy was a "true innocent man" who should not "lose the privilege of being brought up in the security of this country".

– End of February – Begum is being transferred to al-Roj camp in northeast Syria, reportedly because of the threat to her life in al-Hawl after her newspaper interviews were published.

– 7th March – Jarrah dies about three weeks after he was born.

– 19th March – Begum's lawyers are filing a lawsuit against the decision to revoke their citizenship.

– – April 1st – In another interview with The Times, Begum said she had been brainwashed and wanted to "return to the UK for a second chance to start my life again".

– May 4th – Bangladesh Foreign Minister Abdul Momen said Begum could face the death penalty for engaging in terrorism if she entered the country, adding that Bangladesh "had nothing to do with her".

– September 29th – Home Secretary Priti Patel says there is no way to allow Begum to return to the UK, adding: "We cannot allow people who would harm us to enter our country – and that includes this woman. "

– October 22nd to 25th – Begum's appeal against the revocation of her British citizenship begins in London. Her attorney, Tom Hickman QC, alleges the decision made her illegally stateless and placed her at "real risk" of torture or death.

2020

– February 7th – SIAC rules for the legal challenge of Begum

– 16th of July – The appeals court decides on the case and decides in Begum's favor

– November 23rd – The Supreme Court hears the case

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