ENTERTAINMENT

Sexist body terms like Adam's apple should no longer be used, the doctor says


New impetus to rename body parts such as Adam's apple and Achilles tendon because they are "irrelevant and misogynistic"

  • Australian doctors are asking people to stop using medical terms named after men
  • The anatomy lecturer Dr. Kristin Small asks her students to let the language run out
  • Dr. Small urges people to use more practical terms for the body parts
  • Eponyms are body parts that are named after a person, but mostly men

The Lecturer in Anatomy in Queensland, Dr. Kristin Small (pictured) teaches students to remove irrelevant and misogynistic languages

Australian doctors are asking people to stop using terms named after "men, kings, and gods" to describe parts of the body – like Adam's apple and Achilles' heel.

The obstetrician, gynecologist and anatomy lecturer Dr. Kristin Small teaches students to remove irrelevant and misogynistic medical languages.

She believes the terms represent older generations and urges that more practical and meaningful terms be used for body parts.

"I think we have a personal decision to decolonize our language and these historical terms will fade away," said Dr. Small courier mail.

Dr. Small said she made sure that her students still knew eponyms for testing purposes and that there were always alternatives to the name of the "dead".

Eponyms are body parts named after a person, but women are not represented in most of the 700 body parts named after people.

Australian doctors urge people to stop using terms named after "old men, kings and gods" to describe body parts (Image: just a few of the many body parts named after men)

Australian doctors urge people to stop using terms named after "old men, kings and gods" to describe body parts (Image: just a few of the many body parts named after men)

Councilor for the Dr. Nisha Khot of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists believes that one day positive eponyms will be obselete.

Dr. Khot also teaches aspiring doctors how to deal with alternative terminology.

"Young aspiring doctors are mainly interested in learning the more relevant language and are often shocked to hear the origins of some medical terms," ​​she said.

The word "hysterectomy" comes from a time when women were treated for female hysteria by removing the uterus.

But Dr. Khot now prefers the term "uterectomy".

“The urge for change may have started in the area of ​​women's health, but the conversation is now taking place in the broader health community. It only makes sense for doctors, but also for patients, to use more understandable terms, ”said Dr. Khot.

It is believed that the Adam's apple is named after the biblical figure Adam – the first man to be created, who then stuck an apple in his throat.

It is believed that the Adam's apple is named after the biblical figure Adam - the first man to be created, who then stuck an apple in his throat

It is believed that the Adam's apple is named after the biblical figure Adam – the first man to be created, who then stuck an apple in his throat

The Achilles tendon, the hard band of fibrous tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone, is named after the mythological Greek warrior Achilles

The Achilles tendon, the hard band of fibrous tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone, is named after the mythological Greek warrior Achilles

Surgical instruments and tactics are also named after men, such as the acetabular incision, which was named after a man who published an article on incisions in 1900.

The speculum – used by gynecologists to perform a Pap smear – was named after an American slave trader.

The Achilles tendon, the hard band of fibrous tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone, is named after the mythological Greek warrior Achilles.

American researchers published a report on 700 anatomical and histological eponyms and found that only one was named after a woman.

Dr. Small said that much of the female reproductive system is named "after dead types".

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