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Several SAGE members receive gongs in honor of the Queen


Several members of the government's Scientific Advisory Board have received gongs – despite the possibility that their advice may be the subject of future investigation.

Six confirmed members of SAGE (the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies) are to be named OBE in recognition of their work during the pandemic.

However, Tory MPs said the decision was "unwise and premature" as some of their advice had been controversial and could potentially be independently investigated in the future.

Boris Johnson has committed the UK government to an independent pandemic management investigation, reviewing decisions made by ministers and officials based on scientific advice.

Boris Johnson has committed the UK government to an independent investigation into how the pandemic is being dealt with

In the latest UK coronavirus news:

  • Chancellor Rishi Sunak unveiled a local vacation program that covers two-thirds of workers' paychecks up to £ 2,100 a month for workers forced to cease work due to coronavirus restrictions.
  • Coronavirus infection rates are up to seven times higher in student areas than local authorities in England, test data shows, and in Fallowfield, Manchester, 5 percent of people tested positive in the first week of October.
  • Office for National Statistics data showed the UK economy grew just 2.1 percent in August, much less than analysts forecast and well below the 6.4 percent expansion recorded in July.
  • A dispute has broken out over PHE and Professor Whitty has given MPs "shady" data claiming that the coronavirus is spreading widespread in pubs and cafes after only affecting around 160 premises nationwide.
  • Shadow Chancellor Anneliese Dodds claimed that the Chancellor's employment promotion program forced companies to turn a coin about who stays and who goes because it is cheaper to employ a worker for the same hours.
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan has warned the capital could face tighter restrictions as leafy Richmond becomes the hardest hit area. However, one report suggests that the city's R-rate is below 1.
  • Ministers are considering using a computer algorithm to create a "bespoke screening program" taking into account people's personal health and circumstances to determine whether they should be banned.
  • Former Tory Treasury Secretary Lord O & # 39; Neill called for "real decentralization" to improve the coronavirus response and a "bespoke" version of the vacation program.
  • Union leader Sir Keir Starmer, who wrote in the Daily Telegraph, said the government had "lost control of the virus" and urged ministers to "get a grip".

Former Brexit Secretary David Davis said: “It may well be that members of Sage deserve an honor at some point, but this is not the point for a variety of reasons.

“There could be a big investigation and it shouldn't be biased. Receiving an honor can also affect the way their advice is received.

“I think that's not wise, although it may not be wrong. Their advice has been controversial and has changed at times and has been wrong at times, although this is not surprising as it is difficult to respond to an unprecedented pandemic.

"That is reasonable, but it makes awarding an honor early unwise and premature."

Tory MP Sir Desmond Swayne said: “The members of Sage work very hard and they absolutely deserve it. What I would say is that it has to be a lot more representative than it is.

"While it would be grumpy to remove scientists from the list, when all of this comes home to sleep and the clue starts, I don't think an honor would save anyone."

Former Brexit Secretary David Davis said: "It may well be that members of Sage deserve an honor at some point, but this is not the point for various reasons."

Tory MP Sir Desmond Swayne said: “The members of Sage work very hard and they absolutely deserve it. What I would say is that it has to be way more representative than it is & # 39;

Former Brexit Secretary David Davis (left) said: "It may well be that members of Sage deserve an honor at some point, but that is not the point for a variety of reasons." Tory MP Sir Desmond Swayne (right) said: “The members of Sage work very hard and they absolutely deserve it. What I would say is that it has to be way more representative than it is & # 39;

Scientists have recommended closing pubs, maintaining the two-meter rule of social distancing, and tracking herd immunity – saying that Covid is just as deadly as Ebola.

OBE members include Professor Graham Medley, an infectious disease specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Professor Medley, chair of the subgroup on pandemic models, suggested that herd immunity was the only solution to fighting the virus.

He told the BBC, "We have to create what we call herd immunity," which would require "a nice big epidemic".

OBE experts include Professor Graham Medley, an Infectious Disease Specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Professor Calum Semple, Professor of Child Health and Outbreak Medicine at the University of Liverpool, also receives a gong

OBE members include Professor Graham Medley (left), an infectious disease specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Professor Calum Semple (right), Professor of Child Health and Outbreak Medicine at the University of Liverpool, also receives a gong

Professor Catherine Noakes, an expert on airborne infections at the University of Leeds, opposed the government's relaxation of the two-meter rule on social distancing

Professor Julia Gog, a math expert at Cambridge University, was honored for her contribution to science and her response to the virus

Professor Catherine Noakes (left), an airborne infection expert at the University of Leeds, opposed the government's easing of the two-meter rule on social distancing. Professor Julia Gog (right), math expert at the University of Cambridge, was honored for her contribution to science and her response to the virus.

Dr. James Rubin, a behavioral expert at King & # 39; s College London, is also a member of Sage, recognized for his contribution to public health during the pandemic

Professor Lucy Yardley, a health psychology expert at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton, is also honored

Dr. James Rubin (left), a behavioral expert at King & # 39; s College London, is also a member of Sage, who was honored for his contribution to public health during the pandemic. Professor Lucy Yardley (right), a health psychology expert at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton, is also honored

Who is SAGE expert Professor Graham Medley who warned the UK that there could soon be 100 coronavirus deaths a day?

Professor Graham Medley started working at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2015.

According to his online profile, his main focus is on the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases.

It states: “I am particularly interested in understanding how interventions to control infectious diseases are developed and how models relate to policy development.

"The interaction of transmission with social and political processes is of particular interest to me and the focus of my work on HIV / AIDS."

He was one of the first scientists to insist that Brits must change their behavior in order to control the virus as early as March.

Since then, he has been very vocal during the pandemic, often criticizing the government's response.

In June, Professor Medley, who also chaired the SPI-M pandemic modeling committee, slammed Boris Johnson and top ministers, claiming they didn't take the Covid-19 threat seriously until the crisis got out of hand.

He said scientists had made it clear that the virus would "cause a great deal of death and disability."

But he spoke of his frustration that high-ranking politicians "behave in a way that is not too serious".

He said the warnings were made in February, weeks before the outbreak began.

And in September, Professor Medley warned the UK could suffer 100 coronavirus deaths a day for three to four weeks.

He claimed the three-digit number was "inevitable" as the virus remained dangerous to the community.

He came to the figure where a virus mortality rate of one percent was assumed and 10,000 new infections were reported daily.

He told BBC Radio 4, "Even if (the death rate) is 0.8 percent, which I think would be a great success in terms of treatment, it still means deaths will increase."

Research suggests that up to 70 percent of the population would have to be infected with coronavirus in order to achieve herd immunity.

The government initially seemed to adopt the principle before rejecting it, claiming it was never a policy.

In September, Professor Medle warned the UK could suffer 100 coronavirus deaths a day for three to four weeks.

He claimed the three-digit number was "inevitable" as the virus remained dangerous to the community.

He came to the figure where a virus mortality rate of one percent was assumed and 10,000 new infections were reported daily.

He told BBC Radio 4, "Even if (the death rate) is 0.8 percent, which I think would be a great success in terms of treatment, it still means deaths will increase."

Professor Calum Semple, professor of child health and outbreak medicine at the University of Liverpool, has called for a brief national lockdown to help slow the spread of the virus.

He also said the virus was just as deadly as Ebola, which has caused thousands of deaths across Africa, and criticized the government for easing the lockdown.

Professor Catherine Noakes, an expert on airborne infections at the University of Leeds, opposed the government's relaxation of the two-meter rule on social distancing.

She said in June, "There are too many cases in the community for us to consider going under six feet."

Professor Julia Gog, a math expert at Cambridge University, was honored for her contribution to science and her response to the virus.

Dr. James Rubin, a behavioral expert at King & # 39; s College London, is also a member of Sage, recognized for his contribution to public health during the pandemic.

In April, Dr. Rubin said the UK public has a right to know how ministers intend to end the coronavirus lockdown.

He told MPs that transparency on getting back to normal life was needed to maintain public confidence in the "difficult and costly" social distancing restrictions.

He suggested that it should not be made clear to the nation how the way forward could lead to failure, since "it is very important that people set their expectations".

Professor Lucy Yardley, a health psychology expert at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton, is also honored.

Just last month, Professor Yardley criticized the government's "top-down rules", which are constantly changing.

She told the BBC, “I think it's a real problem that people try to follow top-down rules that are constantly changing and different in different places and in different organizations.

"We need fewer rules and more cooperation in order to find out in your individual situation how you can best minimize the risk to those around you."

Other scientific, pharmaceutical, and health professionals called upon during the pandemic were also recognized for their role in the pandemic.

University of Southampton Professor Stephen Holgate, who developed a Covid treatment, has been awarded a knighthood for services to medical research

Emma Walmsley, the executive director of pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), who played a key role in the search for the vaccine, is also being made a lady

University of Southampton Professor Stephen Holgate (left) who developed a Covid treatment is awarded a Knighthood for Merit to Medical Research. Emma Walmsley (right), the executive director of pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), who played a key role in finding the vaccine, is also being made a lady

University of Southampton Professor Stephen Holgate, who developed a Covid treatment, has been awarded a Knighthood for Merit to Medical Research.

Emma Walmsley, the executive director of pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), who played a key role in the search for the vaccine, is also being made a lady.

In April, Ms. Walmsley warned that a coronavirus vaccine cannot be manufactured on a large scale until the end of next year.

She said millions of cans would not be made until the latter half of 2021 "if things go well".

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King's College London, who runs the CSS (Covid Symptom Study) app with health science company ZOE, is named OBE.

Dr. George Kassianos, National Vaccination Director for the Royal College of General Practitioners, is also recognized for his efforts during the pandemic by being named the CBE for Travel Medicine and General Practitioners Services.

Former Chief Scientific Advisor to Scotland, Professor Muffy Calder, Assistant Director and Head of the College of Science and Engineering at the University of Glasgow, has been named lady.

A cabinet spokesman said: “The independent science and technology committee has set a high bar to make recommendations now – and to recognize that work is still ongoing in so many areas.

"The committee looked for important, often voluntary, contributions to the pandemic response affecting the front lines, as well as exceptional career-wide contributions."

Who are the six OBE receiving members of the government's SAGE committee and what did they say during the pandemic?

Professor Graham Medley

Professor Graham Medley, an infectious disease specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, was one of the first scientists to insist that the British must change their behavior as early as March to control the virus.

Professor Graham Medley, an infectious disease specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, was one of the first scientists to insist that Brits need to change their behavior to control the virus in March

Professor Graham Medley, an infectious disease specialist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, was one of the first scientists to insist that Brits need to change their behavior to control the virus in March

Speaking to BBC Newsnight when the UK death toll was just 10, Professor Medley said it would be too late to react when the death toll starts to rise – and people should take it seriously early on

He said his ideal way to process the outbreak is to quarantine all the vulnerable people in northern Scotland and push everyone else to Kent and have a "nice big epidemic" there for people to deal with and can become immune to viruses. then bring society back together.

He admitted it wasn't possible and said the best way to do this was to slow the outbreak and spread cases over a long period of time.

Professor Medley said herd immunity – letting people get infected so they are no longer vulnerable – is only one viable route through the health emergency.

He said lockdown would not pull the country out of the pandemic – just prevent it from spreading in the short term – it would bring the economy to its knees.

He also claimed that rising unemployment, domestic violence and burgeoning mental health problems could be widespread if the normal functioning of society were left paralyzed.

And in May – ahead of the government's plan to reopen schools a month later – Professor Medley said the UK government's scientific advice was "educated questions".

In a record obtained from the Daily Telegraph, he said: “Right now we have to do this by making educated guesswork, institutions and experience, rather than being able to do it in a semi-formal way.

"But a reasonably good answer given before the decision is infinitely more useful than a perfect answer given after the decision is made."

In June, Professor Medley, who also chaired the SPI-M pandemic modeling committee, also slammed Boris Johnson and top ministers, who claimed they didn't take the Covid-19 threat seriously until the crisis got out of hand.

He said scientists had made it clear that the virus would "cause a great deal of death and disability."

But he spoke of his frustration that high-ranking politicians "behave in a way that is not too serious".

In August, he said re-closing pubs to allow schools to reopen may be necessary as a "compromise" to contain a possible surge in coronavirus cases caused by the return of 10 million children to the classroom becomes.

He said most people would prioritize "the health and well-being of children" before going to the pub.

In September, Professor Medley warned the UK could suffer 100 coronavirus deaths a day for three to four weeks.

He claimed the three-digit number was "inevitable" as the virus remained dangerous to the community.

He came to the figure where a virus mortality rate of one percent was assumed and 10,000 new infections were reported daily.

He told BBC Radio 4, "Even if (the death rate) is 0.8 percent, which I think would be a huge achievement in terms of treatment, it still means deaths will increase."

Professor Calum Semple

Professor Calum Semple is Professor of Child Health and Outbreak Medicine at the University of Liverpool and Advisory Respiratory Pediatrician at Alder Hey Children's Hospital. =

Professor Calum Semple is Professor of Child Health and Outbreak Medicine at the University of Liverpool and Advisory Respiratory Pediatrician at Alder Hey Children's Hospital. =

Professor Calum Semple is Professor of Child Health and Outbreak Medicine at the University of Liverpool and Advisory Respiratory Pediatrician at Alder Hey Children's Hospital.

In addition to his doctoral thesis in clinical virology, he received the NIHR National Clinician Scientist Award in 2002.

The scientist, whose research interests lie in bronchiolitis and influenza, is the Senior Clinical Editor of Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses.

In 2016, Professor Semple was awarded the Queen's Ebola Medal for service in West Africa.

In April, Professor Semple urged the British to imagine how deadly the coronavirus is.

He said while coronavirus infects many more people than Ebola, they have similar death rates if the diseases result in hospitalizations.

He said at the time: “To this day, it is a common misconception that Covid is just a bad dose of the flu.

& # 39; Coronavirus is a very serious disease, the raw hospital death rate is in the same order of magnitude as Ebola.

“If you come to the hospital with Covid and are sick enough to be admitted – and you have to be pretty sick to get admitted these days – the crude death rate is between 35 and 40 percent.

“This is the same case where someone with Ebola was hospitalized. People have to hear this and get it in their heads.

At around the same time the children returned to school in September, Professor Semple assured parents that their offspring would not be in danger.

He said, “Serious illnesses are rare and death is infinitely rare.

“They should be confident that their children will not be directly harmed by going back to school, and we know that they will be harmed by being kept out of school for lack of educational opportunities, which has an impact on mental health. & # 39;

Professor Semple hit Boris Johnson's 10 p.m. curfew, which came into play last month, as not being enough to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

He said measures "need to go further" to halt the UK's fast-growing outbreak.

And he said tighter restrictions on the hospitality sector are likely to be needed.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program, "In time, it will likely have to go beyond a 10pm curfew and table service."

He also warned that ministers might need to consider reducing inter-household mixing.

He said new measures could include keeping people out of the office.

Professor Semple added, “I think the rule of six has been tried, it hasn't been time to interfere, but based on the numbers I see it doesn't go far enough.

“The epidemiologists and scientists I work with, and I'm not just talking about the ones on SAGE, I'd say there's barely a thickness of cigarette paper between what we think about it.

"Now is the time to act, we are in a serious situation and the rising numbers are based on the current worst-case scenario."

This month, he recommended considering a brief national lockdown to slow the virus.

Professor Catherine Noakes

Professor Catherine Noakes is a licensed mechanical engineer with research expertise in building physics and environmental engineering

Professor Catherine Noakes is a licensed mechanical engineer with research expertise in building physics and environmental engineering

Professor Catherine Noakes is a licensed mechanical engineer with research expertise in building physics and environmental engineering.

The academic graduated from the University of Leeds with a first-class degree in mathematics in 1996.

After completing her doctorate, the professor joined the university's School of Civil Engineering as a postdoctoral fellow in 2002. She was appointed lecturer in 2007 and promoted to professorship in 2014.

Professor Noakes, who was promoted to Chair in 2014, is a member of the University's Gender Oversight Group.

In May, Professor Noakes informed the Science and Technology Select Committee that there is very little evidence of outdoor transmission of the virus.

She added, "The likelihood that you will get enough inhalation in an outdoor environment is very, very small."

However, she said the two meter rule wasn't overly precautionary as there was evidence of virus transmission at that distance.

Prof. Noakes added, “It may be overly precautionary, but it isn't, especially when you are face to face with someone.

"There is certainly evidence that people can be affected within two meters."

Then, in June, she said coronavirus transmission in the UK was still too high to loosen the two-meter rule of social distancing.

Professor Noakes, an expert on airborne infections at the University of Leeds, told The Times: "There are too many cases in the community for us to consider going below six feet."

“There is already a transmission when we have applied the (two meters) distance. If we reduce it, you essentially double the risk.

"If you have a poorly ventilated room and someone is four meters away – if there is a high level of virus in that room, it can lead to infection."

Professor Julia Gog

Professor Julia Gog is a mathematician and Professor of Mathematical Biology at Cambridge University. She deals with infectious diseases like influenza

Professor Julia Gog is a mathematician and Professor of Mathematical Biology at Cambridge University. She deals with infectious diseases like influenza

Professor Julia Gog is a mathematician and Professor of Mathematical Biology at Cambridge University. She deals with infectious diseases like influenza.

Your work from years gone by may have helped save lives by influencing the early focus on hand washing.

She was involved in a 2017 involving Cambridge and the BBC that simulated the spread of a virus if people continue to live normally.

It found that if people washed their hands an additional five to ten times a day, the number of people who contracted the virus within 100 days could be reduced from 42 million to 21 million.

Dr. James Rubin

Dr. James Rubin is an academic psychologist and lecturer in the psychology of emerging health risks at King & # 39; s College London.

His work seeks to understand how people perceive potential health risks and how this can affect their behavior and well-being.

Dr. James Rubin is an academic psychologist and lecturer in the psychology of emerging health risks at King & # 39; s College London

Dr. James Rubin is an academic psychologist and lecturer in the psychology of emerging health risks at King & # 39; s College London

His research has resulted in his being invited to work with bodies in the UK, EU and the World Health Organization, and has also served as a volunteer non-medical consultant with the Public Health England Emergency Department.

Professor Rubin has studied human responses to health risks such as biological and chemical terrorism and pandemic influenza.

In April, Dr. Rubin said the UK public has a right to know how ministers intend to end the coronavirus lockdown.

He told MPs that transparency about getting back to normal life was needed in order to maintain public confidence in the "difficult and costly" social distancing restrictions.

He suggested that it should not be made clear to the nation how the way forward could lead to failure, since "it is very important that people set their expectations".

Professor Lucy Yardley

Professor Lucy Yardley is Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton

Professor Lucy Yardley is Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton

Professor Lucy Yardley was a professor of health psychology at the University of Bristol and the University of Southampton.

She studied psychology at the University of Southampton before completing a Masters of Science in audiological sciences.

The professor is a Senior Investigator at the National Institute for Health Research and is also Director of LifeGuide Research at the University of Southampton.

In 2010 she was awarded the title of academic at the Academy of Social Sciences.

In May, Professor Yardley warned that people exposed to higher doses of coronavirus are more likely to get seriously ill.

She said evidence shows that "viral load" plays a big role in how sick someone gets.

This explains why so many health care workers who come in direct contact with critically ill patients have become victims and have died from the disease, she said.

In June, she suggested that Brits tracked down by contact tracers should be placed in quarantine hotels to fight the tens of thousands of people who violate the coronavirus self-isolation rules.

She warned that the government's test and trace program could fail due to poor compliance and suggested placing suspected cases in special hotels where compliance is far more likely, such as is happening in South Korea, India and some parts of South America is.

Just last month, Professor Yardley criticized the government's "top-down rules", which are constantly changing.

She told the BBC, “I think it's a real problem that people try to follow top-down rules that are constantly changing and different in different places and in different organizations.

"We need fewer rules and more cooperation in order to find out in your individual situation how you can best minimize the risk to those around you."

Get up, Sir Hercule! Poirot actor David Suchet leads the star honors as Mary Berry and Maureen Lipman turn out to be ladies and English hero Marcus Rashford earns an MBE (while David Attenborough's 'racist' gong gets a makeover)

By Emma Powell and Jennifer Ruby for the Daily Mail

His legion of fans will say it's a mystery why he had to wait so long.

Now, 74-year-old David Suchet, best known for playing Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, has recognized his five-decade career on stage and on screen with a knighthood.

The actor directs a long line of leading figures from the show business world featured in the Queen & # 39; s Birthday Honors. This includes TV chef Mary Berry, who said she was "absolutely overwhelmed" at becoming a lady.

Known for his role as Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, 74-year-old David Suchet has recognized his five decades of stage and screen career with a knighthood

Known for his role as Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, 74-year-old David Suchet has recognized his five decades of stage and screen career with a knighthood

TV chef Mary Berry enters the Queen's list of honor for her birthday

TV chef Mary Berry enters the Queen's list of honor for her birthday

Actress Maureen Lipman also receives condemnation for her work in showbizness

Actress Maureen Lipman also receives condemnation for her work in showbizness

Actress Maureen Lipman is also given a ladies' hood, while there is chivalry for Britain's first rock & # 39; n & # 39; roll star Tommy Steele and soap opera producer Phil Redmond. TV presenter Lorraine Kelly receives a CBE.

Speaking of his award for services to drama and charity, Sir David said: "I am very honored, privileged and grateful to the Queen, my country and my profession."

He joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1973 before making his West End debut in Separation in 1987. He starred in stage productions of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and the importance of being serious.

His numerous television appearances include roles in the ITV drama Henry VIII, a 2006 production of Dracula, Doctor Who and the recent BBC adaptation of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials.

But Sir David – whose older brother is former television news presenter John Suchet – will forever be remembered for playing Poirot from 1989 to 2013. In 1991 he received a Bafta nomination for the role.

The pictured rapper Dizzee Rascall was awarded an MBE in the list of birthday honors

The pictured rapper Dizzee Rascall was awarded an MBE in the list of birthday honors

Pictured first British rock & # 39; n & # 39; roll star Tommy Steele was also knighted

Pictured first British rock & # 39; n & # 39; roll star Tommy Steele was also knighted

Professor Brian Cox, who once starred in D: Ream and later became famous for his work in astrophysics, was anointed with a CBE

Professor Brian Cox, who once starred in D: Ream and later became famous for his work in astrophysics, was anointed with a CBE

Another longtime TV star to be honored was former judge Dame Mary, 85, for Services to Broadcasting, Culinary Arts and Charity. She said of the award, “I am absolutely overwhelmed to receive this very great honor.

“I just wish my parents and brothers were here to share my joy, because my only success at school was just an O level – in cooking, of course! However, I am sure they will look down and smile … I will be celebrating with my husband and family very soon! "

Dame Mary, a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu culinary school, has had an impressive career for six decades.

She was a familiar face on television, hosting shows like Mary Berry Cooks and Marys Absolute Favorites, and has published nearly 70 books since her debut, Mary Berrys Cookbook, in 1970.

Dame Maureen's award makes her the first lady on Coronation Street, where she currently plays Evelyn Plummer.

The 74-year-old, recognized for her contributions to charity, entertainment and the arts, said, “I am proud to be honored by the Queen and the land I love for the work I love.

Pictured Lorraine Kelly is also on the Queen's Honor Roll for her birthday

Pictured Lorraine Kelly is also on the Queen's Honor Roll for her birthday

“My grandfather was given the freedom to live and work in the historic and welcoming city of Hull after escaping persecution in Russia.

Two generations later, the same town, his granddaughter, gave me a full scholarship to live and study theater, resulting in a rich and rewarding career. It's a wonderful reflection on what is, how to trust, this country's enduring generosity towards the immigrant. So, happy birthday, your Majesty, and thank you. "

Dame Maureen's 50-year résumé spans everything from a popular comedy twist in a BT commercial to a supporting role in the Oscar-winning drama The Pianist.

Sir Tommy, 83, often referred to as Britain's first teen idol after becoming famous in the 1950s, said he felt like he was in a "show business fairy tale" and added that the award was a "wonderful thing" be.

A native of Bermondsey, south London, Thomas Hicks first heard the music of Buddy Holly when a ship he served on docked in Virginia, USA, and fell in love with rock and roll.

He became a household name with The Steelmen, who reached # 1 with Singing The Blues in 1956.

Lancashire-born Sir Phil, 71, is a television producer best known for his longtime youth shows Grange Hill and Hollyoaks and the Liverpool-based soap opera Brookside. He ran the independent production company Mersey Television for two decades.

Regarding the honor, he said, “I have always believed that you will get nowhere in life without the help of other people, and while this great honor came as a great surprise, it is also humbling, as I know many, many people to support such nominations . Thank you to everyone for helping me put that great smile on my face. "

Sir David Attenborough, 94, already had a knighthood – but is now also awarded the highly regarded Knight's Grand Cross in the Order of St. Michael and St. George for his contributions to television broadcasting and maintenance.

He said: "I am of course very honored that my work should have been recognized in this way."

60-year-old ITV presenter Miss Kelly, recognized for her contributions to broadcasting, journalism and charity, said, “This is an unexpected honor.

"I am very grateful and humble. Especially since I am in a far more deserving society – especially all those front workers who are real heroes."

Physicist and television presenter Professor Brian Cox, 52, actor Adrian Lester, 52, and singer Joan Armatrading, 69, also receive CBEs.

The TV writer Sally Wainwright, who is behind shows like Happy Valley, Last Tango in Halifax and Gentleman Jack, is awarded an OBE by the Electric Light Orchestra, as is the musician Jeff Lynne (72).

Rapper Dizzee Rascal (36), singer Mica Paris (51) and TV chef Ching-He Huang (42) received an MBE. ITV medical expert Dr. Hilary Jones, 67, said he felt "humbled and delighted" to be an MBE. He regularly presents health departments on ITV's Good Morning Britain and gives advice on coronavirus.

On the list of celebrities who helped in Covid-19's efforts is 30-year-old rapper Lady Leshurr, who after releasing a song earlier this year will receive the British Empire Medal (BEM), which reminds people to wash your hands.

She said, "I can't believe the Queen of England noticed and praised the Queen of Filth."

The novelist Susan Hill, known for her ghost story The Woman in Black, was awarded a ladies hood and joked that she had "caught up" with the friend Dame Judi Dench.

Dame Susan, 78, who also worked as a screenwriter for The Archers on Radio 4, said, "I was very surprised, but of course pleased too."

The co-author Bernardine Evaristo, whose novel Girl, Woman, Other won the Booker Prize last year, was awarded an OBE.

It's Marcus Rashford MBE! The Man Utd striker was recognized on the honor roll for working on feeding disadvantaged children … before calling on the prime minister to extend the free school lunch program

Marcus Rashford has urged the Prime Minister to do more to tackle child food poverty after becoming MBE on Queen's Birthday.

The Manchester United and England star has been recognized for his work in feeding disadvantaged children. This included Boris Johnson being forced to do a U-turn during the summer vacation that saw 1.3 million children receive free vouchers for school meals.

However, Rashford fears that an even bigger crisis looms – with the end of the government's vacation program, which threatens mass unemployment, which could leave families without food – and he wants Mr Johnson to extend the voucher system over the October halftime break.

Marcus Rashford (center) was awarded an MBE for his work on the nutrition of disadvantaged children

Marcus Rashford (center) was awarded an MBE for his work on the nutrition of disadvantaged children

After the news of his MBE broke, Rashford shared a picture on social media and read a newspaper

After the news of his MBE broke, Rashford shared a picture on social media and read a newspaper

"I am incredibly honored and humbled," said Rashford.

“As a young black man from Wythenshawe, I never thought I would accept an MBE, let alone an MBE at the age of 22.

“This is a very special moment for me and my family, but especially for my mother, who really deserves the honor.

“The fight to protect our most vulnerable children is far from over. I would be unfairly treating the families I have met and spoken to if I did not take this opportunity to respectfully urge the Prime Minister, who recommended me for this honor, to have our children with one during the October halftime Extension of support for the voucher program as the vacation program comes to an end and we face increased unemployment.

“It's just another sticking plaster, but one that leaves the parents of millions of children just one less worry.

“Let’s say together that no children in the UK should go to bed hungry. It is never the child's fault not to have access to food. & # 39;

Rashford's appeal came when it was found that 900,000 more children were registered for free school meals during the pandemic.

The Manchester United and England striker continues to urge the government on child poverty

The Manchester United and England striker continues to urge the government on child poverty

Attenborough's "racist" gong is being redesigned

The medal awarded to Sir David Attenborough yesterday was changed after complaining that the portrayal of a black man in chains crushed by a white angel was racist.

Sir David is to be named Knight's Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael and St. George, a Knighthood of the Commonwealth personally made by the Queen.

The recipients receive a badge on which Archangel Michael traditionally tramples on the neck of a lying, dark-skinned man. It is supposed to represent the triumph of St. Michael over the devil.

The gong given to David Attenborough is changed to show an angel standing on a devil's neck

The gong given to David Attenborough is changed to show an angel standing on a devil's neck

In the previous version of the medal, a dark-skinned man was trampled

In the previous version of the medal, a dark-skinned man was trampled

The new version of the medal, which the devil has paler skin on, means Sir David and the royal family avoid major potential embarrassments.

The respected activist leads the new £ 50 million Earthshot environmental award announced by Prince William this week.

William's brother Harry claimed last week that there is still "structural racism" in the UK.

After the police murder of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, by police in the United States earlier this year, more than 20,000 people signed a petition calling for the Order of St. Michael and St. George Gong to be redesigned.

Critics said changing the devil's color didn't go far enough because it still resembled the murder of Mr. Floyd. In addition to the medal, Sir David as a Knight of the Knight's Cross – the highest of the three ranks of the order – is allowed to wear a separate golden star badge on a cape, which is worn on ceremonial occasions. This version shows Satan with strikingly black skin.

Sir Michael Palin, who received a similar award two years ago, said the image of black Satan was "inadequate and insensitive". Sir Patrick Allen, Governor General of Jamaica, said he would no longer wear the medal.

The Cabinet Office said yesterday that Sir David would receive a new style medal featuring a white Satan. A spokesman said all versions of the insignia had been changed, including the gold "star".

The archangel has also been redesigned, showing a slimmer waist and longer blonde hair. However, the Cabinet Office said this did not show that his gender had been changed to female.

Founded in 1818 by the future King George IV, the honor is primarily awarded for outstanding service to the Commonwealth.

A number of Royal Household employees were honored, including Prince Charles & # 39; longtime chauffeur, Princess Anne's waiting ladies, and a royal saddler and crockery maker.

More than 50 employees have been recognized for their services in the Royal Victorian Order, originally founded by Queen Victoria and used for outstanding personal service to the monarchy.

The Queen's Caretaker, Vice Admiral Anthony Johnstone-Burt, in charge of the operation of Buckingham Palace, and Jonathan Weatherby, Her Majesty's Representative at Ascot, were knighted. Leonora, Countess of Lichfield, Araminta Ritchie and Jane Holderness-Roddam, all the ladies waiting for Anne, have been appointed commanders of the Order.

Bella! Ruth Rogers from River Cafe is CBE

River Cafe owner Ruth Rogers has been named a CBE for culinary arts and charity services.

The 72-year-old American chef co-founded the Michelin-starred Italian restaurant in Hammersmith, west London, in 1987.

Jamie Oliver began his career at the fashion establishment, whose regulars include Gwyneth Paltrow, Nigella Lawson and Jemima Goldsmith.

River Cafe owner Ruth Rogers has been named a CBE for culinary arts and charity services

River Cafe owner Ruth Rogers has been named a CBE for culinary arts and charity services

Fashion designer Misha Nonoo, believed to have founded Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, is also a fan. Lady Rogers, pictured with her architect husband Lord Rogers, prepared dinner at Miss Nonoo's lavish wedding to oil tycoon Michael Hess attended by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

She has been involved with several charities, including StreetSmart for combating homelessness and the Refuge charity for domestic violence.

The chef, who received an MBE in hospitality services in 2009, told the Evening Standard in June that there had been no "silver lining" to ban.

The multimillionaire Tory donor who hosted David Cameron's 50th birthday is knighted

A multimillionaire Tory donor who hosted David Cameron's 50th birthday party has been knighted.

Tony Gallagher, a real estate developer who has contributed more than £ 300,000 to the party since 2007, is honored for his "Land Development and Real Estate Services".

The businessman is part of the Chipping Norton set in the Cotswolds town of the former Prime Minister's old Oxfordshire constituency.

In 2016, he hosted a 50th birthday party for Mr. Cameron at Sarsden House, his country house near Chipping Norton. The two men reportedly met when Mr Cameron became the local MP.

The billionaire brothers who just bought the £ 6.8 billion Asda supermarket chain are both CBEs. Mohsin Issa, 49, and his brother Zuber, 48, who grew up in a row house in Blackburn, built their fortune by starting a global gasoline forecourt operator, Euro Garages.

Greetings to the Covid heroes: More than 400 medical professionals and unsung volunteers, including deliverers for supermarket deliveries, are recognized for the Queen's birthday

By Vanessa Allen and Claire Ellicot for the Daily Mail

Doctors, nurses and unsung heroes were honored yesterday for their part in the fight against Covid.

Frontline workers and volunteers gained recognition alongside the famous and powerful as a greeting to those who dealt with the pandemic.

The Queen's birthday party was postponed from June to allow gratitude to be recognized. This means that NHS carers, scientists, supermarket deliverers, and charity workers are all important.

Boris Johnson said the awards showed Britain was "caring, compassionate and determined".

Scientists who advised the government on lockdown decisions and their economic impact on coronavirus response despite the ongoing controversy were also honored.

More than 400 caregivers and volunteers were on a list that included:

  • Knighthoods for actor David Suchet and singer Tommy Steele, soap maker Phil Redmond, and athletics ace Brendan Foster;
  • Lady hoods for TV stars Mary Berry and Maureen Lipman and writer Susan Hill;
  • Covid honors soccer player and school meal fighter Marcus Rashford and lockdown fitness stars Joe Wicks and Mr Motivator;
  • A special honor for David Attenborough, who becomes the Knight Grand Cross;
  • An Order of Honor for the fashion designer Sir Paul Smith;
  • CBEs for billionaire brothers Zuber and Mohsin Issa a week after they bought Asda supermarket chain for £ 6.8 billion;
  • A knighthood for Tory's donor Tony Gallagher, who is friends with David Cameron.

The decision to reflect the coronavirus battle in birthday honors resulted in an unprecedented 4,000 public nominations.

Officials said they had been humiliated by examples of courage, selflessness and determination shown by key workers and volunteers, including many who risked their lives.

Dying patients at Covid Hospital have been helped to finally say goodbye to their families thanks to Alison Williams

Dying patients at Covid Hospital have been helped to finally say goodbye to their families thanks to Alison Williams

The Prime Minister said: "This year's honorary recipients are testament to the kind of country we are in – caring, compassionate and determined in the face of a global pandemic.

“The hard work and dedication of these local, often unsung heroes, helped us prevail. I congratulate you all. "

Charitable fundraisers, hospitals and supermarket deliverers, and home school entrepreneurs were among these honors.

This included Dabirul Islam Choudhury, who raised more than £ 400,000 by walking 970 laps of his garden while fasting for Ramadan. His family said the 100-year-old cried with joy when he learned he should be given an OBE.

NHS nurse Felicia Kwaku received an OBE for her work at King & # 39; s College Hospital in south London. She said, "It's not just about me, it's about my fallen colleagues."

There were also OBEs for the men who developed the NHS volunteer app, Professor Mark Wilson and Ali Ghorbangholi. More than 750,000 people signed up in the first 48 hours after it launched in April.

Ghorbangholi, 29, from Ealing, West London, said: “The response to the app has been really heartwarming. It has reached many people, which shows the levels at which people are ready to help others. This is real evidence of the people of England. & # 39;

A total of 1,495 honors were given, including 414 for services during the pandemic. Fourteen percent went to health and social workers.

This year's list is also the most diverse in the history of honors. 13 percent of all recipients are black and ethnic minorities. This followed calls for greater recognition sparked by the protests against Black Lives Matter.

Geoff Norris used his own car on his days off to ensure the elderly and vulnerable got their purchases during the lockdown

Geoff Norris benutzte an seinen freien Tagen sein eigenes Auto, um sicherzustellen, dass ältere und schutzbedürftige Menschen während der Sperrung ihre Einkäufe erhielten

Familien helfen, sich mit Würde zu verabschieden

Sterbenden Patienten im Covid-Krankenhaus wurde dank Alison Williams geholfen, sich endgültig von ihren Familien zu verabschieden. Der 41-Jährige sammelte Geld, um iPads zu kaufen, damit isolierte Patienten auf der Intensivstation mit Verwandten sprechen konnten, die keinen Besuch abstatten durften. Die zweifache Mutter, die mit der British Empire Medal ausgezeichnet wurde, sagte: „Ich habe eine persönliche Nachricht von jemandem erhalten, der ihren Vater zum letzten Mal über eines der iPads gesehen hat, und das hat mich offensichtlich berührt.

„Das wird für immer bei mir bleiben.“ Frau Williams, eine Krankenschwester am Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, gründete auf dem Höhepunkt der Pandemie eine Wohltätigkeitsorganisation namens Rainbow Boxes, um Notfallpatienten mit Schlafanzügen und Toilettenartikeln zu versorgen. Sie hat mehr als £ gesammelt 50.000.

Asda-Fahrer, der am freien Tag geliefert hat

Geoff Norris benutzte an seinen freien Tagen sein eigenes Auto, um sicherzustellen, dass ältere und schutzbedürftige Menschen während der Sperrung ihre Einkäufe erhielten. Als der ASDA-Fahrer erfuhr, dass eine Rentnerin ihren 90. Geburtstag alleine verbringen würde, organisierte er eine Überraschungsparty – und er und rund 20 Kollegen brachten ihr Kuchen und Blumen und lasen Geburtstagsnachrichten von ihrer Familie in Neuseeland.

Herr Norris, 53, sagte: „Es war ihr Tag, aber ich denke, wir waren noch mehr für sie entschädigt.“ Herr Norris aus Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, sagte, er, Frau Vanessa und ihre Tochter Anna, 22, hätten Bestellungen von entgegengenommen Rentner, die keine Lieferungen online buchen konnten. Er und seine Supermarktkollegen lieferten dann die Lebensmittel an ihren freien Tagen. Herr Norris sagte: "Es gab viele Menschen, die in Not waren und Angst hatten, und wir dachten nur:" Lass uns einfach etwas tun. " Wir haben einfach alles getan, was wir konnten. “

Der 100-jährige Dabirul Islam Choudhury ging 970 Runden seines Gartens, während er für den islamischen heiligen Monat Ramadan fastete, nachdem er sich von der Spendenaktion Sir Tom Moore inspirieren ließ

Der 100-jährige Dabirul Islam Choudhury ging 970 Runden seines Gartens, während er für den islamischen heiligen Monat Ramadan fastete, nachdem er sich von der Spendenaktion Sir Tom Moore inspirieren ließ

Jay Flynns erstes Online-Pub-Quiz stieß bei fast 250.000 Menschen auf Interesse. Mittlerweile hat er mehr als 750.000 Pfund für wohltätige Zwecke gesammelt

Jay Flynns erstes Online-Pub-Quiz stieß bei fast 250.000 Menschen auf Interesse. Mittlerweile hat er mehr als 750.000 Pfund für wohltätige Zwecke gesammelt

Penelope Bond richtete ein landesweites Netzwerk von Freiwilligen ein, die Briefe an Bewohner von Altenpflegeheimen mit dem Titel "Brief an einen Freund" schrieben.

Penelope Bond richtete ein landesweites Netzwerk von Freiwilligen ein, die Briefe an Bewohner von Altenpflegeheimen mit dem Titel "Brief an einen Freund" schrieben.

Die 100 Jahre alte Spendenaktion für den Garten

Dabirul Islam Choudhury weinte vor Freude, als er erfuhr, dass er eine OBE erhalten sollte, sagte seine Familie gestern. Der 100-Jährige ging 970 Runden seines Gartens, während er für den islamischen heiligen Monat Ramadan fastete, nachdem er sich von der Spendenaktion Sir Tom Moore inspirieren ließ. Der dreiköpfige Großvater aus Bow, East London, hatte ursprünglich versucht, 100 Runden zu fahren, ging aber weiter und hat jetzt mehr als 400.000 Pfund für wohltätige Zwecke gesammelt.

MBEs für Fußballer und zwei Fitness-Gurus

By Claire Ellicott, Political Correspondent for the Daily Mail

Der englische Fußballspieler Marcus Rashford hat einen MBE erhalten, nachdem er eine Kehrtwende der Regierung zu kostenlosen Schulmahlzeiten ausgelöst hatte.

Der Spieler von Manchester United wurde für seine Verdienste um schutzbedürftige Kinder in Großbritannien während der Pandemie geehrt.

Der 22-jährige Marcus Rashford setzte sich dafür ein, dass die Regierung während der Sperrung im Sommer ihre Politik der kostenlosen Schulmahlzeiten fortsetzt

Der 22-jährige Marcus Rashford setzte sich dafür ein, dass die Regierung während der Sperrung im Sommer ihre Politik der kostenlosen Schulmahlzeiten fortsetzt

Der 22-jährige Rashford setzte sich dafür ein, dass die Regierung ihre Politik der kostenlosen Schulmahlzeiten während der Sperrung im Sommer fortsetzt.

Seitdem hat er eine Task Force für Kinder-Lebensmittelarmut gebildet, die sich mit einigen der größten Supermärkte und Lebensmittelmarken des Landes zusammenschließt.

Der 35-jährige Fitnesstrainer Joe Wicks wurde zum MBE ernannt, weil er Kindern dabei hilft, während des Lockdowns aktiv und geistig fit mit Online-Sportstunden zu bleiben, und weil er sich für wohltätige Zwecke einsetzt.

35-year-old fitness trainer Joe Wicks was named an MBE for helping children stay active and mentally fit with online exercise classes during lockdown and for his charitable causes

35-year-old fitness trainer Joe Wicks was named an MBE for helping children stay active and mentally fit with online exercise classes during lockdown and for his charitable causes

His YouTube workouts raised £ 580,000 for the NHS.

He said yesterday, "I can't quite believe it … Receiving this is just amazing. I'm so proud of the fact that I did something that helps so many people."

He thanked those who had participated in the workouts and made them "a special moment in my life".

Wicks set a Guinness world record for live streaming after one of its online classes attracted nearly a million viewers.

Fitness trainer Mr. Motivator – real name Derrick Evans, 67 – has also been appointed an MBE and said yesterday that he feels "blessed".

Er sagte über seine OBE: "Ich bin stolz, dass sie mich geehrt haben."

Die Matrone, die den Ruhestand verzögert hat

Susan Williams hat ihren eigenen Ruhestand verschoben, damit sie sich weiterhin um Chelsea Pensioners kümmern kann.

Der 60-Jährige erlebte die Pandemie im Royal Hospital Chelsea, wo ältere Veteranen der Armee vor Covid-19 geschützt waren. Frau Williams, eine Krankenschwester seit ihrem 19. Lebensjahr, sagte, ihre Arbeit während der Pandemie sei von ihrer Mutter inspiriert worden, die ebenfalls Krankenschwester war, aber letztes Jahr starb. Sie plant jetzt ihren verspäteten Ruhestand in den Cotswolds mit Ehemann Graham.

Die Mutter von vier Kindern erhielt eine OBE und sagte: "Ich denke, wenn Sie sich mitten in einer Krise befinden, haben Sie keine Zeit darüber nachzudenken, wie schwierig es ist. Du musst einfach weitermachen und das haben wir getan. "

Rekordquizmaster

Als Jay Flynn während der Sperrung ein Online-Pub-Quiz einrichtete, erwartete er eine Handvoll Teilnehmer. Aber sein erstes Quiz stieß bei fast 250.000 Menschen auf Interesse und er hat jetzt mehr als 750.000 Pfund für wohltätige Zwecke gesammelt. Eine Sonderausgabe seines wöchentlichen Quiz, das von Stephen Fry moderiert wurde, brachte £ 140.000 für Alzheimer's Research UK ein. Die Veranstaltung hält den Guinness-Weltrekord für die meisten Zuschauer eines Live-Stream-Quiz mit mehr als 182.000 Spielern. Der 38-jährige Flynn aus Darwen in Lancashire sagte: "Ich bin stolz zu wissen, dass wir unsere Rolle gespielt haben." Er hat Tausende an eine Wohltätigkeitsorganisation für Obdachlose in London gespendet, die ihm half, als er zwei Jahre auf der Straße war. Er ist jetzt verheiratet, hat einen dreijährigen Sohn und wurde mit einem MBE ausgezeichnet.

Briefe an die Einsamen im Lockdown

Penelope Bond baute ein landesweites Netzwerk von Freiwilligen auf, die Briefe an Bewohner von Altenpflegeheimen schrieben. Als Mitarbeiterin der London North East Railway (LNER) richtete sie einen Brief an einen Freund ein.

Sie engagierte sich zuerst in ihrem örtlichen Pflegeheim in Grantham, Lincolnshire, und fragte die Bewohner, ob sie personalisierte, handgeschriebene Briefe erhalten möchten. Es dauerte jedoch nicht lange, bis Briefe, Postkarten, Rätsel und Gedichte an mehr als 150 Pflegeheime im ganzen Land verschickt wurden. Über 35.000 Nachrichten wurden an die Bewohner verschickt.

"Die Bewohner von Pflegeheimen sind derzeit sehr isoliert und haben keinen Zugang zu Besuchern. Das Versenden von Briefen, Gedichten und Bildern ist daher eine Möglichkeit, ein Lächeln auf ihre Gesichter zu zaubern", sagte Penny, die mit einem BEM ausgezeichnet wurde.

Betreuung älterer Menschen rund um die Uhr

Lynne Grieves zog für 12 Wochen aus ihrem eigenen Haus in ein Pflegeheim, um sich um ältere Bewohner auf dem Höhepunkt der Pandemie zu kümmern. Die 57-jährige Krankenschwester unterstützte das Northlea Court Care Home in Northumberland rund um die Uhr – damit es frei von Infektionen bleibt.

Die Arbeit engagierter Mitarbeiter bedeutete, dass im Pflegeheim keine Leiharbeiter beschäftigt waren, und Miss Grieves sagte, dass dies der Schlüssel sei, um das Heim virenfrei zu halten. Sie sagte: „Die Bewohner sind wie eine Großfamilie und Sie kümmern sich nur um sie, so wie Sie hoffen, dass sich jemand um Ihre Verwandte kümmert.“ BEM-Empfängerin Miss Grieves lebt normalerweise mit ihrer 82-jährigen Mutter Ann zusammen, bleibt aber in Kontakt mit ihr über tägliche Videoanrufe wurde so auch der Achtzigjährige geschützt.

Sie sagte: "Es war eine schwierige Entscheidung, Mutter zu verlassen, aber sie war ein hohes Risiko und ich wollte kein Risiko eingehen. Meine Nichte hat sich während meiner Abwesenheit um sie gekümmert und wusste, dass sie in guten Händen ist. "

Lynne Grieves zog für 12 Wochen aus ihrem eigenen Haus in ein Pflegeheim, um sich um ältere Bewohner auf dem Höhepunkt der Pandemie zu kümmern

Lynne Grieves zog für 12 Wochen aus ihrem eigenen Haus in ein Pflegeheim, um sich um ältere Bewohner auf dem Höhepunkt der Pandemie zu kümmern

Ashleigh Linsdell (Mitte) leitete eine nationale Kampagne zur Herstellung von Peelings für Frontarbeiter, wenn die Vorräte gefährlich knapp wurden

Ashleigh Linsdell (Mitte) leitete eine nationale Kampagne zur Herstellung von Peelings für Frontarbeiter, wenn die Vorräte gefährlich knapp wurden

Jatinder Singh Harchowal war entschlossen, seine Familie vor dem Coronavirus zu schützen, und lebte acht Wochen lang getrennt von ihnen, während er im ersten britischen Nightingale Hospital arbeitete

Jatinder Singh Harchowal war entschlossen, seine Familie vor dem Coronavirus zu schützen, und lebte acht Wochen lang getrennt von ihnen, während er im ersten britischen Nightingale Hospital arbeitete

Als die Regale durch Panikkäufe geräumt wurden und die Verwundbaren zu Beginn der Pandemie darum kämpften, dass sie essen konnten, sprang Laura Winningham in Aktion

As shelves were cleared by panic buying and the vulnerable were left struggling to ensure they could eat at the start of the pandemic, Laura Winningham leapt into action

Nurse made scrubs for NHS workers

Ashleigh Linsdell spearheaded a national campaign to make scrubs for frontline workers when supplies ran dangerously low. The A&E nurse used her own money to buy fabric and appealed for help on social media. More than 70,000 volunteers helped make 1.2 million items of PPE and one million face coverings. Mrs Linsdell, 30, from Cambridge, said volunteers had got in touch from around the world after she set up a Facebook page called For the Love of Scrubs. She said of her OBE: ‘This doesn’t happen to normal people, and I’m just a nurse.’

Nightingale hospital pharmacist

Determined to protect his family from coronavirus, Jatinder Singh Harchowal lived apart from them for eight weeks while he worked at Britain’s first Nightingale Hospital.

The father-of-two said it was hard being apart from his wife Nita and their teenage sons.

But he said the long shifts at the London hospital, where he worked as chief pharmacist, were worthwhile – despite catching coronavirus himself.

The 51-year-old, who was awarded the MBE, set up the pharmacy service and his team in just nine days as the capital’s hospitals struggled to cope with the first wave of the virus. He said: ‘At the peak of the crisis, you really don’t think about what’s going to happen afterwards. Awards and honours were really the last thing on my mind.’

Feeding the needy during pandemic

As shelves were cleared by panic buying and the vulnerable were left struggling to ensure they could eat at the start of the pandemic, Laura Winningham leapt into action. Her initiative resulted in almost four million meals being delivered to the most needy around London, as well as frontline workers. The chief executive of City Harvest London, awarded an OBE, made sure the charity distributed £17million worth of surplus food during lockdown.

The charity, which usually delivers food to homeless shelters, soup kitchens and other organisations looking after the vulnerable, quickly scaled up its emergency response for the pandemic.

Using rapidly-raised funds, Mrs Winningham, 58, hired dozens more drivers, increased the size of her charity’s warehouse and partnered with major retailers including Morrisons. Using food that would otherwise be wasted, the charity has been feeding 20,000 people per day.

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