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Schools in NYC will be closed starting tomorrow as the COVID rate rises


NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio closed schools again on Wednesday. New York City COVID-19 Positivity Rate is 3%

New York City public schools will be closing from Thursday due to the rising COVID-19 test positivity rate, and businesses like gyms – and indoor restaurants – may also close soon.

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday afternoon that all schools would return to distance learning starting Thursday morning as the test positivity rate in New York City was 3 percent.

The earliest they could reopen, he said, was the week after Thanksgiving, but he wouldn't go into details.

& # 39; Nobody is happy about this decision.

"We are all very sad about this decision," said de Blasio on Wednesday afternoon.

The positivity rate in schools is only 0.19 percent, but de Blasio said he stuck to the 3 percent threshold in the city because he decided to do so earlier this year.

De Blasio went on to say that further restrictions on city life are "coming" and "coming soon".

Governor Andrew Cuomo, who decides whether companies stay open or not, said the test positivity rate in New York City was 2.5 percent based on state data, but that if it rose to 3 percent, it would start closing indoor restaurants and gyms. He said it could happen soon.

The state numbers are slightly different from those for the city because the positivity numbers for New York City are based on the day the test was taken. If someone is found positive, they will be found positive in the data on the day they took the test. The state's data are based on the day the positive result is received. Both methods of data collection point in the same direction, deBlasio noted.

In New York City, the Staten Island, Queens, and Bronx boroughs have significantly higher positivity rates than Manhattan and most parts of Brooklyn.

NYC POSITIVITY PRICES

MANHATTAN – 2.3%

BROOKLYN – 3.9%

QUEENS – 4.6%

BRONX – 5.1%

STATES ICELAND – 4.5%

As the number of cases increases, so does the number of daily hospitalizations and deaths.

Meanwhile, Cuomo said the waves in western parts of the state were "astronomical".

There were 29 deaths in New York state on Tuesday.

The number is a far cry from the hundreds that died each day in spring, but it's a worrying increase from the single-digit numbers seen for most of the summer.

The increase also fits with the national trend of rising COVID-19 cases and impending lockdowns.

Various states have started to enact blocking rules again.

New Mexico had most of its stores closed, and California has restrictions as well.

The gathering clouds come in the midst of a ray of hope – the encouraging news that vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna, two American companies, have been shown to be effective in studies.

The first doses are expected to be dispensed in December.

They will first go to the elderly and vulnerable or to frontline workers.

Then they'll be phased out to the public and should be widely available by the end of spring, federal health officials say.

Until then, bans become more and more likely.

If Cuomo decides to shut down some businesses, indoor dining – which is currently 25 percent busy – will be banned and outdoor dining will be limited to four people at a table if NYC hits a positive test rate of 3 percent, based on the state data.

Such a decision would deal a severe blow to the hospitality industry, which continued through the summer by offering outdoor dining.

However, places of worship can still be operated with a capacity of 33 percent.

This is the rising number of cases in New York City. As of Wednesday, the test positivity rate was 3 percent

This is the rising number of cases in New York City. As of Wednesday, the test positivity rate was 3 percent

Hospital stays are also increasing. Above city dates through November 15th

Hospital stays are also increasing. Above city dates through November 15th

Deaths are starting to rise in New York City too, albeit at a slower pace. There were 29 deaths nationwide on Tuesday

Deaths are starting to rise in New York City too, albeit at a slower pace. There were 29 deaths nationwide on Tuesday

This has been the nationwide trend in New York hospital stays since the pandemic began

This has been the nationwide trend in New York hospital stays since the pandemic began

Governor Cuomo snapped at reporters Wednesday when they asked him about the impending lockdown. He said NYC was 0.5% away from another lockdown

Governor Cuomo snapped at reporters Wednesday when they asked him about the impending lockdown. He said NYC was 0.5% away from another lockdown

Speaking at a heated press conference, Cuomo yelled at reporters asking about schools and calling one reporter "disgusting" and warned that there would be a "huge surge" after Thanksgiving as people ignored his rules to avoid large gatherings.

The rules now are that no more than 10 people can get together.

Cuomo said the rising rates of infection are all "self-imposed" and compared them to a person who "eats cheesecake and has a weight problem".

“You're going to see a tremendous spike after Thanksgiving,” Cuomo warned Wednesday, saying, “Thanksgiving is a holiday and people are coming together.

"If you're not really afraid of COVID, you will come together." He said he told his own mother that they couldn't spend Thanksgiving with his family.

“Your family sounds safe, doesn't it? No you won't be sure. It's an illusion. My sister loves me, my sister could infect me. Not maliciously, but accidentally, ”he said.

"Don't be the turkey on Thanksgiving," he warned.

Cuomo said there were "astronomical" gains in some parts of the state

Cuomo said there were "astronomical" gains in some parts of the state

Cuomo became frustrated on Wednesday when journalists asked him whether or not schools would be open tomorrow and whether the decision was up to him or Mayor Bill de Blasio.

He called the first reporter who asked him "disgusting" and said he was not paying attention.

Then he bit back the second reporter, who asked if the schools would be open tomorrow, and then caught a third, who asked if he or de Blasio were making the rules.

"You do not know?" he asked repeatedly.

Since the pandemic began, parents in New York City have found the conflicting comments and rules confusing.

In his letter to the teachers, the school chancellor said: “This has been an eventful and challenging year on so many levels.

“With your efforts and contributions, our school buildings have been a safe place to teach and learn for hundreds of thousands of students over the past few weeks.

& # 39; So far we have found a COVID-19 positivity rate of 0.19 percent in 120,000 students and employees tested.

This has been a reassuring sign that our schools are safe and we are grateful for the tireless work you are doing to make sure this is possible. & # 39;

How US States Are Currently Ranking With COVID-19: Hotspot North Dakota has the highest number of cases and deaths per capita in the world – as nationwide infections, hospitalizations and deaths continue to rise

The COVID-19 crisis continues to worsen in the United States. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths are on the rise, and the hotspot North Dakota currently has the highest number of infections and deaths per capita than any other country.

The number of new cases in the US hit nearly 162,000 yesterday, and hospital admissions hit record highs again with 76,000 patients treated.

The number of deaths continues to rise nationally as well. 1,700 Americans died of COVID-19 yesterday. The daily death toll is still below the high of 2,500 deaths recorded in April during the virus' first peak.

While the surge is widespread, the Midwest is particularly hard hit by hotspot states, including Dakotas, Iowa, and Wisconsin, which recorded the highest number of cases and deaths per capita in the past week.

Across the country, states re-enter various stages of lockdown as the second wave grips the nation. The deaths are now increasing as are the cases, but they are starting to increase

Across the country, states re-enter various stages of lockdown as the second wave grips the nation. The deaths are now increasing as are the cases, but they are starting to increase

This graph shows the states with the highest number of daily COVID-19 cases per 100,000 in the past seven days. According to CDC data, North Dakota had the most new infections per capita in the past week, with 180 infections per 100,000

This graph shows the states with the highest number of daily COVID-19 cases per 100,000 in the past seven days. According to CDC data, North Dakota had the most new infections per capita in the past week, with 180 infections per 100,000

This graph shows the states with the highest number of daily COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 in the past seven days. North Dakota had the highest number of deaths per capita in the past week, with 1.8 deaths per 100,000, according to CDC data

This graph shows the states with the highest number of daily COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 in the past seven days. According to CDC data, North Dakota had the highest number of deaths per capita in the past week, with 1.8 deaths per 100,000

According to CDC data, North Dakota had the most new infections and deaths per capita in the past week, with 180 infections per 100,000 and 1.8 deaths, respectively.

South Dakota ranks second with 161 new cases per capita and 1.7 deaths.

In the past week, nine U.S. states – mostly in the Midwest and led by the Dakotas – have seen more COVID-19 infections than any other part of the country, according to an analysis of Johns Hopkins data from the Federation of American Scientists.

North Dakota also had the highest number of deaths per capita in the world last week.

South Dakota ranks third behind the Czech Republic.

Eighteen of the top 50 places with a high per capita death rate in the world were in the United States in the past week.

South Dakota, Iowa, and Wyoming all currently have positive test rates of over 50 percent, according to Johns Hopkins.

In the past week, nine US states - mostly in the Midwest and led by the Dakotas - have seen more COVID-19 infections than any other part of the country, according to an analysis by the Federation of American Scientists

In the past week, nine US states – mostly in the Midwest and led by the Dakotas – have seen more COVID-19 infections than any other part of the country, according to an analysis by the Federation of American Scientists

North Dakota also had the highest number of deaths per capita in the world last week. South Dakota ranks third behind the Czech Republic. Eighteen of the top 50 places in the world to have high death rates per capita in the past week were in the United States

North Dakota also had the highest number of deaths per capita in the world last week. South Dakota ranks third behind the Czech Republic. Eighteen of the top 50 places with a high per capita death rate in the world were in the United States in the past week

The World Health Organization views rates above 5 percent as worrying as it indicates that there are more cases in the community that have not yet been detected.

With Thanksgiving coming next week, health officials are preparing for a holiday boost and doctors are urging families to hold small gatherings as overwhelmed hospitals across the country struggle to cope.

In its weekly internal report, the Coronavirus Task Force of the White House warned of the "aggressive, relentless" spread of COVID-19 across the country, "with no sign of improvement but of further deterioration," a senior administration official said Tuesday.

Officials said the task force concluded that existing efforts to slow the spread "are inadequate and need to be stepped up to smooth the curve," and that Thanksgiving trips and gatherings "could add significantly to the transmission." .

The number of new cases in the US reached nearly 162,000 yesterday

The number of new cases in the US reached nearly 162,000 yesterday

The number of deaths continues to rise nationally as well. 1,700 Americans died of COVID-19 yesterday. The daily death toll is still below the high of 2,500 deaths recorded in April during the virus' first peak

The number of deaths continues to rise nationally as well. 1,700 Americans died of COVID-19 yesterday. The daily death toll is still below the high of 2,500 deaths recorded in April during the virus' first peak

Hospital stays reached record highs on Tuesday with 76,000 treated patients

Hospital stays reached record highs on Tuesday with 76,000 patients treated

The deadly surge in COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is forcing state and local officials to adjust their plans to fight the virus. Republican governors passed – skeptical in at least one case – mask mandates and schools scrapped plans to reopen classrooms.

WHO WILL GET THE COVID-19 VACCINE FIRST AND WHEN WILL YOU GET IT?

Pfizer's vaccine is on its way to a possible emergency approval earlier this month, but it won't go to all Americans right away.

Healthcare workers can get their first doses in December or January, said the head of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Dr. Jose Romero, opposite NPR.

Next, non-healthcare workers such as grocery store workers, the elderly, and those with underlying illnesses who are at high risk for severe COVID-19 are likely to receive the vaccine.

You can probably get the vaccine early next year.

The elderly include those over 65. People with heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and autoimmune diseases are considered at risk because of their medical history.

It is not clear in what order these next three groups are likely to be vaccinated.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said last month that the public will likely "start vaccinating in the first quarter of 2021 until April 2021," he said CBS evening news.

U.S. officials have not yet made any official recommendations as to who should receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

The ACIP will meet a vaccine and make recommendations within 24 to 48 hours that will receive emergency approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Since the election, Republican governors in Iowa, North Dakota, and Utah have reversed course and made requirements on masks, and others have expanded or expanded previous orders.

In Iowa, Governor Kim Reynolds had opposed a mask mandate for months, but imposed a limited Tuesday, making it the latest GOP holdout to change the course for face coverings.

In South Dakota, Republican Governor Kristi Noem has said she has no plans to make mask requirements.

Dr. Shannon Emry, a health care worker in South Dakota, told CNN that a mask mandate in the state could help slow the spread and ease pressure on already overwhelmed hospitals.

“Our governor misled her constituents. From the start, she downplayed the dangers of the virus, downplayed the importance of wearing a mask and really undermined people's trust in their medical community, ”Emry said. “In this way she puts people in danger.

& # 39; Our hospital systems across the state are already at full capacity, in this critical condition. The healthcare workers are obviously exhausted and the devastating part of them is that we see no end in sight. There is no stop date, there is no timeline. & # 39;

Meanwhile, governors in Ohio, Maryland and Illinois on Tuesday put restrictions on business hours and crowds, while their counterparts in Wisconsin and Colorado proposed economic aid packages. Los Angeles County of 10 million people enacted similar business restrictions.

The U.S. is facing a dark winter that will be a dark winter due to the onset of cold weather and crowded holiday gatherings, as well as neglect to wear masks and other precautions.

Rising infection rates are causing some school districts to return to distance learning or to postpone return to class.

In South Dakota, the school system in the Rapid City area plans to close all schools and move to virtual classes on Wednesday. The district's latest data showed 94 students and 47 employees with an active case of COVID-19 while 105 employees and 676 students were in quarantine after exposure.

On the Las Vegas subway, the Clark County School District has postponed plans to resume partial classroom teaching and will continue distance learning at least until the end of the calendar year.

West Virginia's largest teachers' organization urged Republican Governor Jim Justice to put public schools online only. The state recorded more than 4,400 cases in the week ending Sunday, up 63 percent from the previous week. The governor has already closed Thanksgiving personal tuition through December 3 to avoid vacation travel breakouts.

Former FDA commissioner Dr. However, Mark McClellan said the current surge in COVID-19 cases in the US would likely be the "last major surge" before a vaccine is available.

"The months ahead will look better than the weeks ahead," he said. "Things are getting better."

He said things will get better by early 2021 when a vaccine becomes widely available.

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