TOP TRENDING

Schools could be closed after the first half of February


Michael Gove dealt another blow to parents today when he suggested schools could stay closed after the February semester.

In a sharp warning this morning, the former education minister hinted Schools may even open later than expected, though The government's vaccination campaign remains behind.

Mr Gove warned that the lockdown won't be gradually lifted until March, forcing parents and teachers to prepare for more weeks of home study.

The cabinet minister said that during Education was the "top priority", the government "needs to make progress on vaccination".

Last night, Boris Johnson bowed to the inevitable and closed all schools through February 22nd.

The turnaround at the eleventh hour, on the day many reopened after Christmas, has enraged school principals and unions who have attacked government policies as "madness".

Mr Gove also suggested removing year-end exams for students in favor of alternative assessment styles after the new lockdown.

When asked on BBC Radio 4's Today program whether the Abitur and GCSE were canceled in England, the former Secretary of Education said, "Yes."

He added, “My own daughter is going to graduate from high school this year, my son is going to graduate from GCSEs – I know how hard students across the country worked between ages 11 and 13.

"We will take alternative arrangements to ensure that the hard work students have done to acquire knowledge and develop their skills is appropriately assessed, recognized and recognized."

A teenager starts the new school year 2021 at home with an online introduction from his teacher

14 year old 9th grade student Isla Stanton is starting her home in Ashford, Kent

14 year old 9th grade student Isla Stanton is starting her home in Ashford, Kent

Mr Gove said the full details will be worked out between Ofqual and Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson.

He added, “One of the things about assessment is that students have to do certain tasks that teachers will assess.

"Whether or not they are moderated in a certain way by certain registrars or others is a delicate process."

He also said that the prime minister, who had urged students to keep going to school just hours before Monday night's announcement that they would close, had reluctantly decided to act in the face of a change in coronavirus alert.

He told BBC Breakfast: “The four UK chief medical officers met yesterday and discussed the situation. They recommended moving to level 5, the highest available alert level, which posed an imminent threat for the NHS to be overwhelmed if no action was taken.

Under the circumstances, we felt that we could only close the primary schools that were open.

“Of course it was with a heavy heart, because education is such an important part of a young person's life and we want to keep schools open as much as possible, but the message from yesterday's chief doctor was clear and therefore with a heavy heart, but with clear evidence we had to act. & # 39;

Mr Gove said Education Secretary Gavin Williamson would address a recalled House of Commons Wednesday to brief MPs on how students will be assessed after further learning disabilities later this year.

He told Sky News: "The Secretary of Education has spoken to the Ofqual Examination Board so we can find a way to recognize the immense hard work students have done across the country this year.

“Of course we can't have degrees, GCSEs, or B-Techs like we've had in the past, but there are ways to ensure that we can evaluate the work that students have done and give them fair recognition that and help them to the next level of their training.

"The Education Secretary will say more about this, but it is vital that parents and students realize that their work will be recognized by the end of this year – it's not that anyone would or want to shut down tools, so to speak."

"It is vital that children keep their learning going and we will help them do this by making distance learning easier for more and more students."

Isla Stanton is hired in front of the computer for another long day when she returns home in Kent to study

Isla Stanton is hired in front of the computer for another long day when she returns home in Kent to study

The students have been in tears more confusion about how 11th and 13th graders will be assessed this year – including whether or not the exams will definitely be abandoned – and Ofsted Chief Inspector Amanda Spielman told ministers to make an immediate decision.

One option on the table, according to the Daily Telegraph, was to take GCSE and A-level exams only for “core subjects” like math and English, with all other exams graded based on coursework.

Under fire Education Secretary Gavin Williamson is working with Ofqual, who considered having multiple exam papers for undergraduate students, with a third one on one day, a third the next, and the final third after. Under the plan, they would all take different exams to prevent fraud, but they would all be assessed in the same way by the same standards.

But Dr. Mary Bousted, joint secretary general of the National Education Union, claims School Secretary Nick Gibb called her last night and admitted that for the second year running, there would be no GCSE or A-level exams at all.

And amid the confusion, Michael Gove later confirmed the exams would not take place before schools' admissions could be closed longer if the vaccine rollout stalled.

Michael Gove later confirmed that if the vaccine rollout stalled, the exams would not take place before the approved schools could close any longer

Michael Gove later confirmed that if the vaccine rollout stalled, the exams would not take place before the approved schools could close any longer

Boris Johnson said in his televised address to the nation, "Elementary schools, secondary schools and colleges must move to remote access starting tomorrow, with the exception of vulnerable children and children of key workers."

He hoped schools could reopen after halftime in February. Keeping schools open to children of key workers and in vulnerable situations reflects previous bans.

The kindergartens will also remain open and free meals will continue to be distributed.

Since exams are considered unrealizable, the Ministry of Education is advising how children can get fair grades without introducing another disastrous algorithm.

School principals expressed despair at the futile effort to prepare for a single day of classroom study. Katharine Birbalsingh of Michaela Community School in Wembley, North London, said the sudden hacking and changing was "insane".

She emphasized: "Today I had a training session for my employees on how to manage the Covid tests.

& # 39; We changed our training plans last week to follow new government guidelines. Now are we suddenly delivering online learning tomorrow? This is insane. & # 39;

David Shakeshaft of Firs Primary School in Birmingham said he had to "undo all the work I had to do yesterday and today" before reopening. He wrote online: "Absolutely incomprehensible that I was placed in this position." The government's drive to get elementary school children back to school has been in tatters since Sunday night when it became clear that hundreds of school principals were unable or unwilling to reopen.

Pressure had increased since the release of documents last week showing that government scientific advisors had warned before Christmas that schools would have to be closed to lower the R-rate of Covid infection.

Last night, Mr Johnson admitted schools could act as "vectors of transmission" – hours after First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced similar closings for Scotland.

He said, "We have done everything in our power to keep schools open because we know how important every day in education is for children's life chances."

Naomi Carpenter, a 20-year-old sports rehab student at Hull University, is taking a swab for a side-flow Covid-19 test at campus sports facilities as students return to university. She has to go home now

Naomi Carpenter, a 20-year-old sports rehab student at Hull University, is taking a swab for a side-flow Covid-19 test at campus sports facilities as students return to university. She has to go home now

Ministers have already faced union anger over the government's chaotic plans to reopen schools in January

Ministers have already faced union anger over the government's chaotic plans to reopen schools in January

University students also face another prolonged study spurt in their bedrooms rather than in classrooms, so the demand for tuition fees and reimbursements for accommodation is likely to increase. With certain exceptions for courses such as medicine, students have already been told to stay away on January 25th at the earliest, but the campus ban will now continue into the next month.

The summer school exams cancellation will align England with Wales and Scotland, both of which decided to abandon the idea long before the current crisis.

Mr Johnson said it was "not possible or fair for all exams to go ahead as usual this summer".

The Mail believes Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will now turn his attention to ensuring schools offer quality online teaching and introducing the free laptop program.

Robert Halfon, chair of the Commons Education Committee, said the government had no choice but to cancel exams.

Labor Head Boy Wes Streeting, however, said the cancellation will "create additional worry for students and teachers" as the government does not have a "Plan B".

Former Tory Education Secretary Lord Baker told the Mail it was "important" that all school staff be vaccinated and testing plans strengthened at the school during the closure.

In a rare positive case, around 130,000 students taking vocational exams this month can continue to take the papers.

Just last week, Mr Williamson told the Commons that the "overwhelming majority" of the primaries would open their doors on Monday. He told MPs: "Children have to be in school, so we will always do everything we can to withstand jerky reactions to nearby schools or colleges."

But the National Education Union had predicted a “snowball effect” of the teacher rebellion, saying yesterday that employees in 6,000 primaries – around 35 percent – had refused to work. Former Conservative Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt was one of the first MPs to break the pro-school consensus yesterday by saying it should close "immediately."

Miss Sturgeon ordered Scottish schools to remain closed until at least early February.

The Welsh government has also announced that it will switch to online learning by at least January 18th.

Mary Bousted of the National Education Union said, "This is a crisis point for the nation and much of what has brought us here should not simply be attributed to new strains of the virus."

She insisted, “The government had eight months to prepare for another phase of distance learning and alternatives to exam assessment at GCSE and A levels. But it didn't use that time wisely or well. & # 39;