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School principals are alarmed about the plan to allow students to use their replicated A-Level scores as a final grade


Teachers are alarmed by the decision to allow A-Level students to use their mock scores as their final grade.

Sham results have been described as "the most uniquely inconsistent information that could possibly be used," and warnings have been issued that the new system may indeed increase injustice.

Many students are expected to require schools to submit evidence on their behalf to Ofqual, the Examination Board, if they top today's grades during the taunts earlier this year.

But teachers warned last night that giving grades will not be a fair way. Different schools have different grading practices for mock exams and they are held under different conditions – with some schools being stricter than others.

Teachers warned that using mock exam results to award A-level grades would not be fair after the government announced that students could use their mock exam results as a final grade. Pictured: Secretary of State for Education Gavin Williamson

While some schools put up tougher bogus papers to give students a wake up call so they can work harder for reality, others make it easier for students to travel in hopes that it will help build their morale.

Teachers also warned that schools may not have kept the labeled papers they are required to produce as "evidence" – and they could have been thrown away.

Inconsistent information

Barnaby Lenon, Chair of the Independent Schools Council, said, "What if the mock score was expressed as a percentage rather than a grade?" What if you're a school that got ridiculed in some subjects but not in others? That becomes problematic. "

Nick Hillman, director of the Institute for Higher Education Policy, added, "Mocks have never been more important, so many schools don't have a safe paper path and may have literally thrown them in the trash."

Francesca Craig, principal at St. Peter's School in Durham, described Mocks as "the most uniquely inconsistent information that could possibly be used".

Liz Laybourn, director of Burgess Hill Girls in West Sussex, said: “The mockery is inconsistent and schools use them in different ways. Some will put harder papers to give students a jolt and encourage them to revise, for example.

"We also know that some students don't work as hard for their taunt as the real one, so the result doesn't reflect how they would have done on the real exam."

The pupils were informed that they can take exams in the fall if they are dissatisfied with their bogus grades or the results given by the examination boards. Pictured: Students are returning to St Paul & # 39; s High School for the first time since the coronavirus lockdown began almost five months ago on August 12, 2020 in Glasgow

The pupils were informed that they can take exams in the fall if they are dissatisfied with their bogus grades or the results given by the examination boards. Pictured: Students are returning to St Paul & # 39; s High School for the first time since the coronavirus lockdown began almost five months ago on August 12, 2020 in Glasgow

School Secretary Nick Gibb said mocks had to be "sat on exam" to form the basis of a calling, but did not provide a method for schools to prove. Ofqual was directed to determine how mocks could be used, but said it couldn't give details, adding that it would try to provide guidance next week.

Fiona Boulton, Director of Guildford High School and Chair of the Headmasters' Conference, said, "We need a definition of the term 'mock' because it is very different in every school."

Robert Blewitt, Director of Lewes Old Grammar School, added, “My teachers have worked long and hard to provide center-graded grades that accurately reflect the extent of their students' hard work. So why does the government rely on bogus results that often don't reflect skills? instead of what the teachers tell them? & # 39;

Pictured School Secretary Nick Gibb said ridicule had to be "sat under exam conditions" to form the basis of an appeal, but did not provide a method for schools to prove

Pictured School Secretary Nick Gibb said ridicule had to be "sat under exam conditions" to form the basis of an appeal, but did not provide a method for schools to prove

David Laws, former school minister and executive chairman of the Education Policy Institute, said, “Offering a bogus option does little to resolve the issue of fairness. Ofqual is now faced with the big task of setting the standards for a valid sham result. "

Students can take exams in the fall if they are dissatisfied with their grades or the results given by the examination boards.

Mr. Gibb insisted that the government had nothing to excuse for acting so late in the day in England.

He told BBC Breakfast: “There is no confusion. We were very clear from the start. We had to have a system in place to give qualifications to young people because we canceled the exams.

"We don't apologize to anyone for looking for solutions."